Accessibility Guidelines Working Group - Publications

Recommendations

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7 translations for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.2
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Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.2 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content more accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including accommodations for blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity, and combinations of these, and some accommodation for learning disabilities and cognitive limitations; but will not address every user need for people with these disabilities. These guidelines address accessibility of web content on desktops, laptops, tablets, and mobile devices. Following these guidelines will also often make Web content more usable to users in general.

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Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity, and combinations of these. These guidelines address accessibility of web content on desktops, laptops, tablets, and mobile devices. Following these guidelines will also often make your Web content more usable to users in general.

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1 translation for Accessibility Conformance Testing (ACT) Rules Format 1.0
日本語

This is a W3C Recommendation. Defines a format for writing accessibility test rules for automated testing tools and manual testing methodologies. It can be used for evaluation to different accessibility standards, such as the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

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Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity and combinations of these. Following these guidelines will also often make your Web content more usable to users in general.

WCAG 2.0 success criteria are written as testable statements that are not technology-specific. Guidance about satisfying the success criteria in specific technologies, as well as general information about interpreting the success criteria, is provided in separate documents. See Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview for an introduction and links to WCAG technical and educational material.

WCAG 2.0 succeeds Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 [WCAG10], which was published as a W3C Recommendation May 1999. Although it is possible to conform either to WCAG 1.0 or to WCAG 2.0 (or both), the W3C recommends that new and updated content use WCAG 2.0. The W3C also recommends that Web accessibility policies reference WCAG 2.0.

Notes

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Provides detailed information about the intent of each WCAG 2.0 success criterion and describes benefits, examples, failure conditions, and recommended techniques in various technologies.

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This document is a companion to the Accessibility Conformance Testing (ACT) Rules Format 1.0 specification. It lists common input aspects as defined by the ACT Rules Format 1.0 specification. This document is informative. It provides a reference to well defined input aspects to assist authors in writing ACT Rules and to support the consistency of ACT Rules.

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This document is a gap analysis and roadmap for the state of accessibility for people with learning and cognitive disabilities when using the Web and information technologies. It builds on the information presented in Cognitive Accessibility User Research and Cognitive Accessibility Issue Papers to evaluate where user needs remain to be met in technologies and accessibility guidelines. For various accessibility issues, this document provides a summary of issues and techniques, then identifies gaps and unmet user needs and suggest ways to meet these needs.

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Documents authoring practices in various technologies that may be used to satisfy the WCAG 2.0 success criteria.

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WCAG-EM provides an approach for evaluating how websites - including web applications and websites for mobile devices - conform to WCAG 2.0. It covers different situations, including self-assessment and third-party evaluation.

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This document, “Guidance on Applying WCAG 2.0 to Non-Web Information and Communications Technologies (WCAG2ICT)” describes how the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and its principles, guidelines, and success criteria can be applied to non-web Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), specifically to non-web documents and software. It provides informative guidance (guidance that is not normative and does not set requirements).

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Requirements used for development of WCAG 2.0.

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Techniques that apply across technologies for authors of Web content who wish to claim conformance to WCAG 1.0

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1 translation for CSS Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0
português (Brasil)

This document describes techniques for authoring accessible Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Cascading Style Sheets are defined by the W3C Recommendations "CSS Level 1" [CSS1] and "CSS Level 2" [CSS2]. This document is intended to help authors of Web content who wish to claim conformance to "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0" ([WCAG10]). While the techniques in this document should help people author CSS that conforms to "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0", these techniques are neither guarantees of conformance nor the only way an author might produce conforming content.

This document is part of a series of documents about techniques for authoring accessible Web content. For information about the other documents in the series, please refer to "Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0" [WCAG10-TECHS].

Note: This document contains a number of examples that illustrate accessible solutions in CSS but also deprecated examples that illustrate what content developers should not do. The deprecated examples are highlighted and readers should approach them with caution -- they are meant for illustrative purposes only.

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This document describes techniques for authoring accessible Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) content (refer to HTML 4.01 [HTML4]). This document is intended to help authors of Web content who wish to claim conformance to "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0" ([WCAG10]). While the techniques in this document should help people author HTML that conforms to "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0", these techniques are neither guarantees of conformance nor the only way an author might produce conforming content.

This document is part of a series of documents about techniques for authoring accessible Web content. For information about the other documents in the series, please refer to "Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0" [WCAG10-TECHS].

Note: This document contains a number of examples that illustrate accessible solutions in CSS but also deprecated examples that illustrate what content developers should not do. The deprecated examples are highlighted and readers should approach them with caution -- they are meant for illustrative purposes only.

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Gateway to a series of related documents that provide techniques for satisfying the requirements defined in WCAG 1.0.

Working Drafts

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The W3C Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 3.0 provide a wide range of recommendations for making web content more accessible to users with disabilities. Following these guidelines will address many of the needs of users with blindness, low vision and other vision impairments; deafness and hearing loss; limited movement and dexterity; speech disabilities; sensory disorders; cognitive and learning disabilities; and combinations of these. These guidelines address accessibility of web content on desktops, laptops, tablets, mobile devices, wearable devices, and other web of things devices. They address various types of web content including static content, interactive content, visual and auditory media, and virtual and augmented reality. The guidelines also address related web tools such as user agents (browsers and assistive technologies), content management systems, authoring tools, and testing tools.

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Explores how testability and page-based conformance verification of accessibility guidelines presents challenges for a broad range of websites and web applications.

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This document is a gap analysis and roadmap for the state of accessibility for people with learning and cognitive disabilities when using the Web and information technologies.

First Public Working Drafts

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The Requirements for WCAG 3.0 document is the next phase in the development of the next major upgrade to accessibility guidelines that will be the successor to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2 series. The Silver Task Force of the Accessibility Guidelines Working Group and the W3C Silver Community group have partnered to incubate the needs, requirements, and structure for the new accessibility guidance.

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Describes what people with low vision need for electronic content, tools, and technologies to be accessible. Includes an overview of low vision and describes specific user needs.

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Outlines the requirements that the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group has set for the development of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 extensions. These extension requirements build on the existing requirements for WCAG 2.0, and are designed to work in harmony with the WCAG 2.0 standard.

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Mobile Accessibility: How WCAG 2.0 and Other W3C/WAI Guidelines Apply to Mobile” describes how the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and its principles, guidelines, and success criteria can be applied to mobile web content, mobile web apps, native apps, and hybrid apps using web components inside native apps. It provides informative guidance, but does not set requirements. It also highlights the relevance of the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 in the mobile context.

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Describes the challenges of using web technologies for users with learning disabilities or cognitive disabilities.

Draft Notes

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This document, “Guidance on Applying WCAG 2.2 to Non-Web Information and Communications Technologies (WCAG2ICT)” describes how the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.2 and its principles, guidelines, and success criteria can be applied to non-web Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), specifically to non-web documents and software. It provides informative guidance (guidance that is not normative and does not set requirements).

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This Explainer accompanies the drafts of the W3C Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 3.0.

Retired specifications