W3C

Category Archives: Web Architecture

Security and Privacy for our times

To address the evolving threats to users’ security and privacy online, the W3C Technical Architecture Group and the Privacy Interest Group have updated the Security and Privacy Questionnaire so that developers of web features consider and mitigate modern threats to users as they design their features. The goal of the document is to provide a […]
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Our ethics drive the architecture of the web

The TAG publishes ethical principles for spec authors and platform developers. A big part of our job as the TAG is to help spec authors with their ideas for a new feature on the web. We help them think about things like how their proposal could work with other features, whether it might have unintended […]
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Distributed and syndicated content: what’s wrong with this picture?

You know those AMP URLs you get from Google search results and which often pop up on Twitter? Instead of https://www.rt.com/sport/…  you’ll get https://www.google.co.uk/amp/ s/www.rt.com/document/… What you’re seeing is Google’s AMP project hosting content for Russia Today. This lets Google load the page during the search results, so that when you click on the link on […]
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On EME in HTML5

The question which has been debated around the net is whether W3C should endorse the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) standard which allows a web page to include encrypted content, by connecting an existing underlying Digital Rights Management (DRM) system in the underlying platform. Some people have protested “no”, but in fact I decided the actual logical […]
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The TAG’s concerns about the Digital Object Architecture and the Web

Recently, the UN’s ITU has been involved in standardising and supporting a new architecture for resource identity and resolution, the Digital Object Architecture (DOA). Descriptions of the DOA indicate that it is designed to create and manage persistent identifiers for all entities in the Internet of Things, tracking and policing copyright, interoperable medical records, and […]
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DOI/DONA vs. the Internet

I’ve recently been looking at some of the DO (Digital Object) literature, and DOI/DONA, and I’m still not clear what it amounts to nowadays. I’ve discussed it a bit internally at W3C and wanted to share my views here as well. If it wasn’t for the IoT and ITU context, I’d say it’ll have a […]
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Memento at the W3C

The W3C Wiki and the W3C specifications are now accessible using the Memento “Time Travel for the Web” protocol. This is the result of a collaboration between the W3C, the Prototyping Team of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Web Science and Digital Library Research Group at Old Dominion University. The Memento protocol is […]
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An array of tools to ensure security and privacy of the Open Web Platform

As noted in “Better specifications for the sake of the Web” last month, W3C conducts wide reviews for an ever-increasing number of specifications; and Virginie and Richard provided some tips to make those reviews more effective. We’re pleased to add more tools, focused on privacy and security on the Web. Today, the Technical Architecture Group […]
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Assuring a Strong and Secure Web Platform

At the recent W3C TPAC meeting the TAG convened a special session to discuss, among other things, Cory Doctorow’s call for a “non-agression covenant.” The concern Cory has voiced is related to the unintended consequences of certain pieces of legislation which have had a chilling effect on security research on software. Although Cory’s concerns have mostly […]
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