W3C

Provenance Current Status

This page summarizes the relationships among specifications, whether they are finished standards or drafts. Below, each title links to the most recent version of a document.

Completed Work

W3C Recommendations have been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and are endorsed by the Director as Web Standards. Learn more about the W3C Recommendation Track.

Group Notes are not standards and do not have the same level of W3C endorsement.

Standards

2013-04-30

PROV-DM: The PROV Data Model

PROV-DM is a core data model for provenance for building representations of the entities, people and processes involved in producing a piece of data or thing in the world. PROV-DM is domain-agnotisc, but with well-defined extensibility points allowing further domain-specific and application-specific extensions to be defined. It is accompanied by PROV-ASN, a technology-independent abstract syntax notation, which allows serializations of PROV-DM instances to be created for human consumption, which facilitates its mapping to concrete syntax, and which is used as the basis for a formal semantics.

2013-04-30

PROV-O: The PROV Ontology

This specification defines the PROV Ontology as the normative representation of the PROV Data Model using the Web Ontology Language (OWL2). This document is part of a set of specifications being created to address the issue of provenance interchange in Web applications.

2013-04-30

Constraints of the PROV Data Model

PROV-DM, the PROV data model, is a data model for provenance that describes the entities, people and activities involved in producing a piece of data or thing. PROV-DM is structured in six components, dealing with: (1) entities and activities, and the time at which they were created, used, or ended; (2) agents bearing responsibility for entities that were generated and activities that happened; (3) derivations of entities from entities; (4) properties to link entities that refer to a same thing; (5) collections forming a logical structure for its members; (6) a simple annotation mechanism.

This document introduces a further set of concepts useful for understanding the PROV data model and defines inferences that are allowed on provenance statements and validity constraints that PROV instances should follow. These inferences and constraints are useful for readers who develop applications that generate provenance or reason over provenance.

2013-04-30

PROV-N: The Provenance Notation

PROV-DM, the PROV data model, is a data model for provenance that describes the entities, people and activities involved in producing a piece of data or thing. PROV-DM is structured in six components, dealing with: (1) entities and activities, and the time at which they were created, used, or ended; (2) agents bearing responsibility for entities that were generated and activities that happened; (3) derivations of entities from entities; (4) properties to link entities that refer to the same thing; (5) collections forming a logical structure for its members; (6) a simple annotation mechanism.

To provide examples of the PROV data model, the PROV notation (PROV-N) is introduced: aimed at human consumption, PROV-N allows serializations of PROV instances to be created in a compact manner. PROV-N facilitates the mapping of the PROV data model to concrete syntax, and is used as the basis for a formal semantics of PROV. The purpose of this document is to define the PROV-N notation.

Group Notes

2013-06-27

Linked Data Glossary

The Linked Data Glossary contains terms defined and used to describe Linked Data, and its associated vocabularies and best practices related to publishing structured data on the Web using open Web standards.

2013-04-30

PROV-AQ: Provenance Access and Query

This document specifies how to use standard Web protocols, including HTTP, to obtain information about the provenance of Web resources.

2013-04-30

Dublin Core to PROV Mapping

This document provides a mapping between the PROV-O OWL2 ontology and the Dublin Core Terms Vocabulary.

2013-04-30

Linking Across Provenance Bundles

Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. Bundles, defined in as sets of provenance descriptions, were introduced in PROV as the mechanism by which provenance of provenance can be expressed. Bundles, whose validity is established independently of each other [PROV-CONSTRAINTS], are essentially independent of each other, acting as islands of provenance descriptions.

2013-04-30

PROV-Overview

Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. The PROV Family of Documents defines a model, corresponding serializations and other supporting defintions to enable the inter-operable interchange of provenance information in heterogeneous environments such as the Web. This document provides an overview this family of documents.

2013-04-30

PROV Model Primer

This document provides an intuitive introduction and guide to the PROV data model for provenance (PROV-DM). This primer explains the fundamental PROV-DM concepts in non-normative terms, and provides worked examples applying the PROV-O OWL2 ontology, and is intended as a starting point for those wishing to create or make use of PROV-DM data.

2013-04-30

PROV-XML: The PROV XML Schema

Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. PROV-DM is the conceptual data model that forms a basis for the W3C provenance (PROV) family of specifications. It defines a concepts for expressing provenance information enabling interchange. This document introduces an XML schema for the PROV data model (PROV-DM), allowing instances of the PROV data model to be serialized in XML.

2013-04-30

PROV-Dictionary: Modeling Provenance for Dictionary Data Structures

Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. This document describes extensions to PROV to facilitate the modeling of provenance for dictionary data structures. [PROV-DM] specifies a Collection as an entity that provides a structure to some constituents, which are themselves entities. However, some applications may need a mechanism to specify more structure to a Collection, in order to accurately describe its provenance. Therefore, in this document, we introduce Dictionary, a specific type of Collection with a logical structure consisting of key-value pairs.

The PROV Document Overview describes the overall state of PROV, and should be read before other PROV documents.

2013-04-30

PROV Implementation Report

This document reports on implementations and usage of the four normative specifications ([PROV-DM], [PROV-N], [PROV-O], [PROV-CONSTRAINTS]) of the PROV Family of Documents [PROV-OVERVIEW]. In particular, it's aim is to demonstrate that the features defined in PROV are implementable and interoperable. Features are defined as: the constructs specified in [PROV-DM] and their realisation in OWL (see [PROV-O]) and in the [PROV-N] syntax; the constraints defined within [PROV-CONSTRAINTS]. Interoperability is defined through both the interchange of provenance information and the coverage of test cases.

2013-04-30

Semantics of the PROV Data Model

This document presents a model-theoretic semantics for the PROV data model (called the naive semantics), viewing PROV-DM statements as atomic formulas in the sense of first-order logic, and viewing the constraints and inferences specified in PROV-CONSTRAINTS as a first-order theory. It is shown that the first-order theory is sound with respect to the naive semantics. This information may be useful to researchers or users of PROV to understand the intended meaning and use of PROV for modeling information about the actual history, derivation or evolution of Web resources. It may also be useful for development of additional constraints or inferences for reasoning about PROV or integration of PROV with other Semantic Web vocabularies. It is not proposed as a canonical or required semantics of PROV and does not place any constraints on the use of PROV.