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W3C Website redesign, phase 1 RFP

7 November 2019 | Archive

W3C is accepting proposals from outside vendors to redesign the existing W3C website. Our organization, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year, produces open and royalty-free Web Standards and guidelines that make the Web work, for everyone.

We believe that by implementing current web best practices and technologies, revising the information architecture, creating a content strategy and revamping the visual design, we can provide our audiences with the best information in a more user-friendly fashion, motivate participation in the organization, and communicate the nature and impact of the W3C more effectively.

The current website was redesigned in 2008, moving to a responsive layout, a revised architecture and a custom CMS. Now over 10 years old, the website is showing its age and we have determined that it is not as effective in supporting the W3C’s mission and goals as it could be.

The purpose of our Website redesign RFP is to identify a fully qualified proposer. Interested parties are encouraged to take advantage of the open Questions and Answers period, and required to submit a written proposal to Coralie Mercier, Head of W3C Marketing & Communications who manages this project, no later than 13 December 2019 1700 UTC. We expect to award the project on January 10, 2020.

Verifiable Credentials Data Model 1.0 is a W3C Recommendation

19 November 2019 | Archive

The Verifiable Claims Working Group has published Verifiable Credentials Data Model 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation. Credentials are a part of our daily lives; driver’s licenses are used to assert that we are capable of operating a motor vehicle, university degrees can be used to assert our level of education, and government-issued passports enable us to travel between countries. This specification provides a mechanism to express these sorts of credentials on the Web in a way that is cryptographically secure, privacy respecting, and machine-verifiable.

Call for Review: Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) – Version 2 is a W3C Proposed Recommendation

19 November 2019 | Archive

The Dataset Exchange Working Group has published a Proposed Recommendation of Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) – Version 2. DCAT is an RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web. This document defines the schema and provides examples for its use. DCAT enables a publisher to describe datasets and data services in a catalog using a standard model and vocabulary that facilitates the consumption and aggregation of metadata from multiple catalogs. This can increase the discoverability of datasets and data services. It also makes it possible to have a decentralized approach to publishing data catalogs and makes federated search for datasets across catalogs in multiple sites possible using the same query mechanism and structure. Aggregated DCAT metadata can serve as a manifest file as part of the digital preservation process.

Comments are welcome through 7 January 2020.

W3C Invites Implementations of Service Workers 1

19 November 2019 | Archive

The Service Workers Working Group has published a Candidate Recommendation of Service Workers 1. This specification describes a method that enables applications to take advantage of persistent background processing, including hooks to enable bootstrapping of web applications while offline. The core of this system is an event-driven Web Worker, which responds to events dispatched from documents and other sources. A system for managing installation, versions, and upgrades is provided. The service worker is a generic entry point for event-driven background processing in the Web Platform that is extensible by other specifications.

Comments are welcome by 31 January 2020.

First Public Working Draft: Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) v1.0

7 November 2019 | Archive

The Decentralized Identifier Working Group has published a First Public Working Draft of Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) v1.0. Decentralized identifiers (DIDs) are a new type of identifier for verifiable, decentralized digital identity. These new identifiers are designed to enable the controller of a DID to prove control over it and to be implemented independently of any centralized registry, identity provider, or certificate authority. DIDs are URLs that relate a DID subject to means for trustable interactions with that subject by way of a DID document. DID documents are simple documents that describe how to use that specific DID. Each DID document may express cryptographic material, verification methods, and/or service endpoints. These provide a set of mechanisms which enable a DID controller to prove control of the DID. Service endpoints enable trusted interactions with the DID subject.

This document specifies a common data model, a URL format, and a set of operations for DIDs, DID documents, and DID methods.

Updated Candidate Recommendations for WoT Thing Description and WoT Architecture

6 November 2019 | Archive

The Web of Things Working Group invites implementations of two updated Candidate Recommendations published today:

  • Web of Things (WoT) Thing Description: This document describes a formal model and common representation for a Web of Things Thing Description. A Thing Description describes the metadata and interfaces of Things, where a Thing is an abstraction of a physical entity that provides interactions to and participates in the Web of Things.
  • Web of Things (WoT) Architecture: This document describes the abstract architecture for the W3C Web of Things, which consists of three initial building blocks, i.e., (1) WoT Thing Description, (2) WoT Scripting API and (3) WoT Binding Templates.

Comments are requested by 4 December 2019.

Accessibility Conformance Testing (ACT) Rules Format 1.0 is a W3C Recommendation

31 October 2019 | Archive

The Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (AGWG) has published Accessibility Conformance Testing (ACT) Rules Format 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation. This standard helps developers of automated testing tools and manual testing methodologies to write, share, and implement test rules. The test rules contribute to consistent testing for accessibility standards compliance. ACT is introduced in the ACT Overview. For more information and examples of organizations already using ACT, see the blog post: Calibrate Your Accessibility Evaluation With ACT.

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