W3C

Talks by W3C Speakers

Many in the W3C community — including staff, chairs, and Member representatives — present W3C work at conferences and other events. Below you will find a list some of the talks. All material is copyright of the author, except where otherwise noted.

Listing is based on the following search constraints:

  • Possible presentation dates: past few months and upcoming
  • Technology area: Web Design and Applications

January 2016

February 2016

March 2016

April 2016

May 2016

  • 2016-05-09 (9 MAY)

    Catching Up with Accessibility: Beginner's Basics (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    If you're just getting started in web accessibility or if you want to make sure you have the basics covered, this class is for you. It provides you with a solid foundation for understanding how people with disabilities use the web, experiencing common web accessibility barriers, and learning the easy things and the most important things you can do now to get up to speed on accessibility. We'll focus mostly on the user experience aspects of web accessibility, and mention a little about the underlying code. (You don't need to know HTML or coding to get a lot from this class.) For those who want to learn about checking/evaluating web accessibility, this class provides a good basis for tomorrow's class, "Easy Checks for Web Accessibility: Get the Gist (No Experience Necessary)."
  • 2016-05-09 (9 MAY)

    Easy Checks for Web Accessibility: Get the Gist (No Experience Necessary) (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    Have you ever wondered: "Is this web page accessible?" If you can use the Web, you can get a good start at an answer — no expertise required! Whereas web accessibility evaluation tools spit out complex results that require knowledge to interpret, the W3C resource "Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility" provides a different approach. It walks you through some basic accessibility evaluation with guidance for understanding what you are checking. Most people can complete these checks in about 10 minutes once they understand them. If you're new to web accessibility, it will take some time to learn. This session provides a jump start to understanding and using Easy Checks so that you can start to answer: "Is this web page accessible?” (Monday's class, "Catching Up with Accessibility: Beginners Basics," provides a handy background for this class; however, it is not a prerequisite.)
  • 2016-05-09 (9 MAY)

    The WAI to Web Accessibility: An Interactive Tour Through Resources form the W3C Web Accessibility (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry, Sharron Rush, and Brent Bakken

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    W3C WAI is best know for WCAG, the international web standard Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. Yet WAI provides a wealth of web accessibility information for project managers, content authors, developers, designers, testers, policy makers, trainers, people with disabilities, accessibility advocates, and others. However, some people are overwhelmed from starting with the standards. But there's an easier way! In this class we'll help you find the gold within the WAI website. WAI provides resources to help you create an environment where accessibility flourishes -- whether you need to better understand how people use the web, prepare a business case to secure management support, train developers new to accessibility, integrate accessibility into a project plan, write an accessibility policy, meet international standards, or learn best practices for mobile accessibility. Whatever your web accessibility questions, and we'll show you where to go for answers. You'll also get a sneak peak at new resources in development and learn how you can help advance web accessibility and share your insights with others.

June 2016

November 2016

  • 2016-11-21 (21 NOV)

    XForms, the only Standard Web Framework

    by Steven Pemberton

    NLUUG najaarsconferentie
    (NLUUG Autumn Conference)

    Bunnik, The Netherlands

    Relevant technology areas: Web Architecture, XML Core Technology, and Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    XForms is a W3C standard that was originally designed to allow the specification of form-handling on the web. However, after the release of version 1.0, it was quickly realised that with a small amount of generalisation the markup could be used for more general processing and application definition. And so was born XForms 1.1. XForms has now been in use for a number of years, and is widely used on websites, but also for other applications, such as the definition of machine interfaces, the operation of submarines, for ship-building, banking and insurance, food processing, medical research, and many others. The Dutch weather service KNMI is based on XForms; several Dutch government ministries use XForms. XForms is an integral part of ODF, the Open Office Format. XForms has a number of unique properties when compared with most framework languages. Firstly it has a strict separation of data and user-interface, allowing you to specify what might be called data sheets with initial values, types, constraints and dependencies, separately from the interface. Secondly, the interface uses intent-based controls that only specify what the control is supposed to do, and not how it should achieve that. That means for instance that the same control can drive a menu, or a drop down list or radio buttons, depending on needs. This can be changed by style sheets for instance. This makes applications far more device-independent, since an application can adapt to its environment, rather than requiring the author to write different applications for different devices. Thirdly, functionality is specified declaratively rather than procedurally. This reduces the size of application significantly, and vastly reduces production times and costs (examples have shown that an order of magnitude savings can be achieved). This talk introduces the elements of XForms, and then develops a Google-maps-style application in about 100 lines of code.

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