Technical Architecture Group - Publications

Recommendations

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4 translations for Architecture of the World Wide Web, Volume One
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The World Wide Web uses relatively simple technologies with sufficient scalability, efficiency and utility that they have resulted in a remarkable information space of interrelated resources, growing across languages, cultures, and media. In an effort to preserve these properties of the information space as the technologies evolve, this architecture document discusses the core design components of the Web. They are identification of resources, representation of resource state, and the protocols that support the interaction between agents and resources in the space. We relate core design components, constraints, and good practices to the principles and properties they support.

Notes

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This document contains a set of design principles to be used when designing Web Platform technologies. These principles have been collected during the Technical Architecture Group’s discussions in reviewing developing specifications. We encourage specification designers to read this document and use it as a resource when making design decisions.

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This document contains a set of questions to be used when evaluating the security and privacy implications of web platform technologies.

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This document is intended to inform future social and legal discussions of the Web by clarifying the ways in which the Web's technical facilities operate to store, publish and retrieve information, and by providing definitions for terminology as used within the Web's technical community. This document also describes the technical and operational impact that does or could result from legal constraints on publishing, linking and transformation on the Web.

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This document is the report of the TAG Task Force established to explore how interoperability between HTML and XML could be improved. It describes several use cases that the Task Force considered relevant and proposed resolutions to those cases.

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The Resource Description Framework RDF allows users to describe both Web documents and concepts from the real world—people, organisations, topics, things—in a computer-processable way. Publishing such descriptions on the Web creates the Semantic Web. URIs (Uniform Resource Identifiers) are very important, providing both the core of the framework itself and the link between RDF and the Web. This document presents guidelines for their effective use. It discusses two strategies, called 303 URIs and hash URIs. It gives pointers to several Web sites that use these solutions, and briefly discusses why several other proposals have problems.

Working Drafts

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This CSS module defines an API for registering new CSS properties. Properties registered using this API are provided with a parse syntax that defines a type, inheritance behaviour, and an initial value.

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Converting CSSOM value strings into meaningfully typed JavaScript representations and back can incur a significant performance overhead. This specification exposes CSS values as typed JavaScript objects to facilitate their performant manipulation.

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This document addresses the issue of the mode in which a URL identifies information about the content or a description of the content by describing how to define data formats and publish the information.

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This document recommends best practices for the authors of media type definitions, for the authors of structured syntax suffix definitions (such as +xml), for the authors of specifications that define syntax for fragment identifiers, and for authors that publish documents that are intended to be used with fragment identifiers or who refer to URIs using fragment identifiers.

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A finding of the W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG), this document addresses the question of whether or not adding new names to a (published) namespace is a sound practice.

First Public Working Drafts

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Capability URLs grant access to a resource to anyone who has the URL. There are times when this is useful, for example one-shot password reset URLs, but overuse can be problematic as URLs cannot generally be kept secret. This document provides some good practices for web developers who wish to incorporate capability URLs into their applications.

Draft Notes

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The web should be a platform that helps people and provides a positive social benefit. As we continue to evolve the web platform, we must therefore consider the consequences of our work. The following document sets out ethical principles that will drive the W3C's continuing work in this direction.

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This document provides definitions for privacy and related concepts that are applicable worldwide. It also provides a set of privacy principles that should guide the development of the Web as a trustworthy platform. People using the Web would benefit from a stronger relationship between technology and policy, and this document is written to work with both.

Retired specifications