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Web of Devices

W3C is focusing on technologies to enable Web access anywhere, anytime, using any device. This includes Web access from mobile phones and other mobile devices as well as use of Web technology in consumer electronics, printers, interactive television, and even automobiles.

Mobile Web Header link

W3C promotes “One Web” that is available on any device. W3C’s Mobile Web Initiative helps ensure the best user experience on mobile devices, taking into account device capabilities, location, and other context information.

Voice Browsing Header link

The W3C Speech Interface Framework is a suite of specifications (e.g. VoiceXML) integrating Web technology and speech interaction. VoiceXML, PLS, SISR, SRGS, SCXML, and CCXML all contribute to the Speech Interface Framework.

Device Independence and Content Adaptation Header link

Devices come in many shapes, capabilities and sizes which define constraints on the content these devices can handle. Device descriptions, content transformation guidelines, device APIs and CC/PP help developers to optimize the user experience.

Multimodal Access Header link

Increasingly, interactions with devices doesn’t only happen with a keyboard, but also through voice, touch and gestures. The W3C Multimodal architecture and its components (EMMA, InkML) allow developers to adapt applications to new interaction modes.

Web and TV Header link

With the advent of IP-based devices, connected TVs are progressing at a fast pace and traditional TV broadcasting is quickly evolving into a more immersive experience where users can interact with rich applications that are at least partly based on Web technologies. There is strong growth in the deployment of devices that integrate regular Web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and SVG, coupled with various device APIs.

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The Web Payments Interest Group is organizing its second face-face meeting next month, on 2-4 February 2015, in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Hosted by Rabobank , this meeting is bringing a wide variety of stakeholdersto help set the directions of work and define the requirements needed to influence how Web Payments evolve.

The mission of the Web Payments Interest Group, part of the Web Payments Activity, is to identify and leverage the conditions for greater uptake and wider use of Web Payments through the identification of standardization needs to increase interoperability between the different stakeholders and the different payment methods.


Filed under: html5apps , Payment , Standardization

As the Open Web Platform expands, and apps are developed that access various sensitive resources, new ways of managing permissions to access these resources are likely to arise. The newly formed W3C Trust & Permissions Community Group will explore and evaluate such ways based upon experience with native and hybrid platforms, and drawing upon research studies. This follows on from the Paris meeting on trust and permissionsheld on 3-4 September 2014.

Resources vary in sensitivity and timeliness, e.g. when and to whom a password should be disclosed is quite different from when access to the user’s webcam should be granted. Similarly, modes of obtaining user permission vary, including asking users upfront for permission when an app is installed or first run (exemplified in Android and Windows) or asking users for permission when the application is attempting to use a given capability (exemplified in iOS) and permission can even be obtained after the fact by inviting the user to continue or to cancel an action after it has occurred, i.e. asking for forgiveness rather than permission. In some cases, the user’s actions can be taken as implicitly granting permission, such as the Windows file chooser dialog. A further approach is for users to delegate decisions on permissions to a trusted 3rd party.

The goal of this CG is to develop and articulate best practices for which modes of obtaining permission best match which resource types, and make these best practices available to both platform developers (browser and operating system vendors) and app developers. Ideally the APIs offered to apps to obtain permission to access resources should be consistent across platforms, while allowing platforms the flexibility to present a user experience that meets each platform’s needs.

The scope of this Community Group is limited to discussion and guidance on best practices, to review draft APIs from individual WG’s, and pre-standardisation work on promising ideas for better user experience obtaining permission, including trusted UI and trust delegation per Roesner et al. Work on best practices will focus on the kinds of resources that need protection, the enumeration of good ways to obtain user permission, to dis-recommend permission models that are known to be problematic, and to recommend the preferred user experience for a given kind of resource. The main focus is on the Open Web Platform, but packaged apps are not excluded.

W3C Community Groups are open to anyone to join, free of charge. If you have expertise in regard to handling trust and permissions for applications, you will be very welcome as a new member of the Trust & Permissions CG.


Filed under: html5apps

W3C announced today the 8th MultilingualWeb workshop in a series of eventsexploring the mechanisms and processes needed to ensure that the World Wide Web lives up to its potential around the world and across barriers of language and culture.

This workshop will be held 29 April 2015in Riga, Latvia, and is made possible by the generous support of the LIDER project . The workshop is part of the Riga Summit 2015 on the Multilingual Digital Single Market(27-29 April)

Anyone may attend all sessions at no charge and the W3C welcomes participation by both speakers and non-speaking attendees. Early registration is encouraged due to limited space.

Building on the success of seven highly regarded previous workshops, this workshop will emphasize new technology developments that lead to new opportunities for the Multilingual Web. The workshop brings together participants interested in the best practices and standards needed to help content creators, localizers, language tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web. It provides further opportunities for networking across communities. We are particularly interested in speakers who can demonstrate novel solutions for reaching out to a global, multilingual audience.

See the Call for Participation and register online.

The W3C Internationalization Working Group has published a First Public Working Draft of Indic Layout Requirements on behalf of the Indic Layout Task Force , part of the W3C Internationalization Interest Group.

This document describes the basic requirements for Indic script layout and text support on the Web and in eBooks. These requirements provide information for Web technologies such as CSS, HTML and SVG about how to support users of Indic scripts. The current document focuses on Devanagari, but there are plans to widen the scope to encompass additional Indian scripts as time goes on.

Publication as a First Public Working Draft, signals the beginning of the process, rather than an end point. We are now looking for comments on the document. Please send any comments you have to public-i18n-indic@w3.org . The archive is public, but you need to subscribeto post to it.

This is the 28 November – 5 December 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Net Neutrality & Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

4articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

Mobile Web Apps roadmap illustrtion

A deliverable of the HTML5Apps project, the October 2014 edition of the W3C Standards for Web Applications on Mobileincludes changes and additions since July 2014, notably emerging work such as:

  • the Second Screen Presentation Working Group API to request display of content on an external screen,
  • a draft API from the Web Bluetooth Community Group,
  • Device APIs Working Group work on a generic pattern for sensors APIs,
  • as well as work on an API to manage permissions across other APIs.

This document is the 15th edition of this overview of mobile Web applications technologies. A live version of this document accepts contributions on the W3C Web and Mobile Interest Group Github repository.


Filed under: HTML5 , html5apps , Mobile , Standardization

HTML5 logo The W3C HTML5Apps team is very proud to relay the good news that HTML5 reached the W3C Web standard status today!

HTML5 defines the fifth major revision of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), the format used to build Web pages and applications, and the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform.

Today we think nothing of watching video and audio natively in the browser, and nothing of running a browser on a phone,” said Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and Web inventor. “ We expect to be able to share photos, shop, read the news, and look up information anywhere, on any device. Though they remain invisible to most users, HTML5 and the Open Web Platform are driving these growing user expectations.

HTML5 brings to the Web video and audio tracks without needing plugins; programmatic access to a resolution-dependent bitmap canvas, which is useful for rendering graphs, game graphics, or other visual images on the fly; native support for scalable vector graphics (SVG) and math (MathML); annotations important for East Asian typography (Ruby); features to enable accessibility of rich applications; and much more.

W3C20 video

Web standards for the future

For news on what’s next after HTML5, see W3C CEO Jeff Jaffe’s blog post on “ Application Foundations for the Open Web Platform”.

Find out in less than 2 minutes why Web Standards for the future are important by watching the  Web standards for the futurevideo.


Filed under: HTML5 , html5apps , Standardization

HTML5Apps/W3C announced today a new Web Payments Initiativeto integrate payments seamlessly into the Open Web Platform.

W3C calls upon all industry stakeholders–banks, credit card companies, governments, mobile network operators, payment solution providers, technology companies, retailers, and content creators– to join the new Payments Interest Groupand leverage the unique ability of the Web to bridge ecosystem diversity and reach users everywhere, on any device.

The result will be new business opportunities, an improved user experience for online transactions, reduced fraud, and increased interoperability among traditional solutions and future payment innovations.

Read the full press release ( in English and in French ) including testimonials from W3C MembersBloomberg, Gemalto, GRIN Technologies, Ingenico Group, NACS, Rabobank, and Yandex.


Filed under: html5apps , Payment , Standardization

This is the 3-10 October 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

22articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

The Encoding specificationhas been published as a Candidate Recommendation. This is a snapshot of the WHATWG document, as of 4 September 2014, published after discussion with the WHATWG editors. No changes have been made in the body of this document other than to align with W3C house styles. The primary reason that W3C is publishing this document is so that HTML5 and other specifications may normatively refer to a stable W3C Recommendation.

Going forward, the Internationalization Working Group expects to receive more comments in the form of implementation feedback and test cases. The Working Group
believes it will have satisfied its implementation criteria no earlier than 16 March 2015. If you would like to contribute test cases or information about implementations, please send mail to www-international@w3.org.

The utf-8 encoding is the most appropriate encoding for interchange of Unicode, the universal coded character set. Therefore for new protocols and formats, as well as existing formats deployed in new contexts, this specification requires (and defines) the utf-8 encoding.

The other (legacy) encodings have been defined to some extent in the past. However, user agents have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification addresses those gaps so that new user agents do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations and existing user agents can converge.

Events Header link

  • 2015-05-18 (18 MAY) 2015-05-22 (22 MAY)

    WWW2015

    Florence, Italy

See full list of W3C Events.