W3C

Web Design and Applications

Web Design and Applications involve the standards for building and Rendering Web pages, including HTML, CSS, SVG, device APIs, and other technologies for Web Applications (“WebApps”). This section also includes information on how to make pages accessible to people with disabilities (WCAG), to internationalize them, and make them work on mobile devices.

HTML & CSS Header link

HTML and CSS are the fundamental technologies for building Web pages: HTML (html and xhtml) for structure, CSS for style and layout, including WebFonts. Find resources for good Web page design as well as helpful tools.

JavaScript Web APIs Header link

Standard APIs for client-side Web Application development include those for Geolocation, XMLHttpRequest, and mobile widgets. W3C standards for document models (the “DOM”) and technologies such as XBL allow content providers to create interactive documents through scripting.

Graphics Header link

W3C is the home of the widely deployed PNG raster format, SVG vector format, and the Canvas API. WebCGM is a more specialized format used, for example, in the fields of automotive engineering, aeronautics.

Audio and Video Header link

Some of the W3C formats that enable authoring audio and video presentations include HTML, SVG, and SMIL (for synchronization). W3C is also working on a timed text format for captioning and other applications.

Accessibility Header link

W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has published Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) to help authors create content that is accessible to people with disabilities. WAI-ARIA gives authors more tools to create accessible Web Applications by providing additional semantics about widgets and behaviors.

Internationalization Header link

W3C has a mission to design technology that works across cultures and languages. W3C standards such as HTML and XML are built on Unicode, for instance. In addition, W3C has published guidance for authors related to language tags bi-directional (bidi) text, and more.

Mobile Web Header link

W3C promotes “One Web” that is available on any device. W3C’s Mobile Web Best Practices help authors understand how to create content that provides a reasonable experience on a wide variety of devices, contexts, and locations.

Privacy Header link

The Web is a powerful tool for communications and transactions of all sorts. It is important to consider privacy and security implications of the Web as part of technology design. Learn more about tracking and Web App security.

Math on the Web Header link

Mathematics and formula are used on the Web for business reports, education materials and scientific research. W3C’s MathML enables mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for other types of content.

News Atom

mcforgue

15 October 2014

from Mobile Web @ W3C - W3C

HTML5Apps/W3C announced today a new Web Payments Initiativeto integrate payments seamlessly into the Open Web Platform.

W3C calls upon all industry stakeholders–banks, credit card companies, governments, mobile network operators, payment solution providers, technology companies, retailers, and content creators– to join the new Payments Interest Groupand leverage the unique ability of the Web to bridge ecosystem diversity and reach users everywhere, on any device.

The result will be new business opportunities, an improved user experience for online transactions, reduced fraud, and increased interoperability among traditional solutions and future payment innovations.

Read the full press release ( in English and in French ) including testimonials from W3C MembersBloomberg, Gemalto, GRIN Technologies, Ingenico Group, NACS, Rabobank, and Yandex.


Filed under: html5apps , Payment , Standardization

The CSS WG changed seven drafts into Notes, to indicate that no further work on them is expected: CSS TV Profile 1.0, CSS Presentation Levels Module, CSS Mobile Profile 2.0, CSS Marquee Module Level 3, Behavioral Extensions to CSS, CSS3 Hyperlink Presentation Module and The CSS ‘Reader’ Media Type

This is the 3-10 October 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

22articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

This is the 19-26 September 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

7articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

Screen shot 2014-09-26 at 16.36.47

The W3C needs to make sure that the typographic needs of scripts and languages around the world are built in to technologies such as HTML, CSS, SVG, etc. so that Web pages and eBooks can look and behave as expected for people around the world.

To that end we have experts in various parts of the world documenting typographic requirements and gaps between what is needed and what is currently supported in browsers and ebook readers.

The flagship document is Requirements for Japanese Text Layout. The information in this document has been widely used, and the process used for creating it was extremely effective. It was developed in Japan, by a task force using mailing lists and holding meetings in japanese, then converted to english for review. It was published in both languages.

We now have groups working on Indic Layout Requirements and Requirements for Hangul Text Layout and Typography, and this month I was in Beijing to discuss ongoing work on Chinese layout requirements (URL coming soon), and we heard from experts in Mongolian, Tibetan, and Uyghur who are keen to also participate in the Chinese task force and produce similar documents for their part of the world.

The Internationalization (i18n) Working Group at the W3C has also been working on other aspects of the mutlilingual user experience. For example, improvements for bidirectional text support (Arabic, Hebrew, Thaana, etc) for HTML and CSS, and supporting the work on counter stylesat CSS.

To support local relevance of Web pages and eBook formats we need local experts to participate in gathering information in these task forces, to review the task force outputs, and to lobby or support via coding the implementation of features in browsers and ereaders. If you are one of these people, or know some, please get in touch!

We particularly need more information about how to handle typographic features of the Arabic script.

In the hope that it will help, I have put together some information on current areas of activity at the W3C, with pointers to useful existing requirements, specifications and tests.It is not exhaustive, and I expect it to be added to and improved over time.

Look through the list and check whether your needs are being adequately covered. If not, write to www-international@w3.org (you need to subscribefirst) and make the case. If the spec does cover your needs, but the browsers don’t support your needs, raise bugs against the browsers.

This is the 12-19 September 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

6articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

The Encoding specificationhas been published as a Candidate Recommendation. This is a snapshot of the WHATWG document, as of 4 September 2014, published after discussion with the WHATWG editors. No changes have been made in the body of this document other than to align with W3C house styles. The primary reason that W3C is publishing this document is so that HTML5 and other specifications may normatively refer to a stable W3C Recommendation.

Going forward, the Internationalization Working Group expects to receive more comments in the form of implementation feedback and test cases. The Working Group
believes it will have satisfied its implementation criteria no earlier than 16 March 2015. If you would like to contribute test cases or information about implementations, please send mail to www-international@w3.org.

The utf-8 encoding is the most appropriate encoding for interchange of Unicode, the universal coded character set. Therefore for new protocols and formats, as well as existing formats deployed in new contexts, this specification requires (and defines) the utf-8 encoding.

The other (legacy) encodings have been defined to some extent in the past. However, user agents have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification addresses those gaps so that new user agents do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations and existing user agents can converge.

mcforgue

17 September 2014

from Mobile Web @ W3C - W3C

The W3C HTML Working Group , responsible for the HTML5 specification’s progress, has published a Proposed Recommendation of HTML5(on 16 September 2014). This specification is intended to become a W3C Recommendation (or Web standard).

The W3C Membership and other interested parties are invited to review the document and send comments to public-html@w3.org ( archives) through 14 October 2014.

Learn more about the HTML Activity.


Filed under: HTML5 , html5apps

This is the 5-12 September 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst]

Open Web & net neutrality

A meetingwas held in Paris on 3-4 September 2014 to bring together browser vendors and other stakeholders to discuss next steps for work on trust and permissions for the Open Web Platform, based upon insights gained from experience with native app platforms, hybrid and proprietary Web platforms.

Meeting participants included Apple, Ericsson, ETRI, Gemalto, GM, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Samsung, Sony Mobile, and Qualcomm.  We reviewed how permissions are handled in existing platforms, including current APIs in the Open Web Platform,  as well as for iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Chrome Apps, Firefox OS and GM’s Web platform for automotive.

We then looked at what can be learned from research studies. Adrienne Porter Felt introduced her work towards comprehensive and effective permission systems. This includes a diagram depicting a decision graph for determining the most effective permission grant mechanism in any given context.

Permissions mechanismsWe also heard about the role of trusted UI where user actions implicitly grant permissions in an intuitive way. We continued with discussion of which considerations are important for the Open Web Platform and a review of a draft permissions testing API from Google.

The final session considered plans for future work, identifying areas of rough consensus, and areas where further work is needed to close the gap.  We identified suggestions for existing W3C groups, and a proposal for a new Community Group to focus on best practices. For more details, see the meeting minutes and the plans for future work. We gratefully acknowledge Gemalto for hosting this meeting.


Filed under: Event , html5apps , Standardization

Talks and Appearances Header link

See also the full list of W3C Talks and Appearances.

Events Header link

  • 2014-10-20 (20 OCT) 2014-11-16 (16 NOV)

    JavaScript training course

    Online course

    Learn the tips and tricks of the language! Register soon.
  • 2014-10-23 (23 OCT) 2014-10-25 (25 OCT)
  • 2014-11-20 (20 NOV) 2014-11-21 (21 NOV)

    Workshop on Privacy and User–Centric Controls

    Berlin, Germany

    Hosted by Deutsche Telekom

    Participants will investigate strategies toward better privacy protection on the Web that are effective and lead to benefits in the near term. This includes discussing basic privacy UI features that will, on the long run, create a user experience that loops with user expectations. We expect certain controls and dashboards in a car. Perhaps we can create a similar clarity for the privacy dashboard of our devices.

    The Workshop focus will be on users: user experience, user behavior and how we can offer controls that provide the necessary transparency of privacy-affecting interactions. We will also discuss how developers can meet users' privacy needs on the Web, including what APIs are necessary for user privacy.

See full list of W3C Events.