W3C

Web Design and Applications

Web Design and Applications involve the standards for building and Rendering Web pages, including HTML, CSS, SVG, device APIs, and other technologies for Web Applications (“WebApps”). This section also includes information on how to make pages accessible to people with disabilities (WCAG), to internationalize them, and make them work on mobile devices.

HTML & CSS Header link

HTML and CSS are the fundamental technologies for building Web pages: HTML (html and xhtml) for structure, CSS for style and layout, including WebFonts. Find resources for good Web page design as well as helpful tools.

JavaScript Web APIs Header link

Standard APIs for client-side Web Application development include those for Geolocation, XMLHttpRequest, and mobile widgets. W3C standards for document models (the “DOM”) and technologies such as XBL allow content providers to create interactive documents through scripting.

Graphics Header link

W3C is the home of the widely deployed PNG raster format, SVG vector format, and the Canvas API. WebCGM is a more specialized format used, for example, in the fields of automotive engineering, aeronautics.

Audio and Video Header link

Some of the W3C formats that enable authoring audio and video presentations include HTML, SVG, and SMIL (for synchronization). W3C is also working on a timed text format for captioning and other applications.

Accessibility Header link

W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has published Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) to help authors create content that is accessible to people with disabilities. WAI-ARIA gives authors more tools to create accessible Web Applications by providing additional semantics about widgets and behaviors.

Internationalization Header link

W3C has a mission to design technology that works across cultures and languages. W3C standards such as HTML and XML are built on Unicode, for instance. In addition, W3C has published guidance for authors related to language tags bi-directional (bidi) text, and more.

Mobile Web Header link

W3C promotes “One Web” that is available on any device. W3C’s Mobile Web Best Practices help authors understand how to create content that provides a reasonable experience on a wide variety of devices, contexts, and locations.

Privacy Header link

The Web is a powerful tool for communications and transactions of all sorts. It is important to consider privacy and security implications of the Web as part of technology design. Learn more about tracking and Web App security.

Math on the Web Header link

Mathematics and formula are used on the Web for business reports, education materials and scientific research. W3C’s MathML enables mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for other types of content.

News Atom

The W3C i18n Working Group has published a new Working Draft of Predefined Counter Styles . This document describes numbering systems used by various cultures around the world and can be used as a reference for those wishing to create user-defined counter styles for CSS. The latest draft synchronizes the document with changes to the related document CSS Counter Styles Level 3 , for which a second Last Call is about to be announced. If you have comments on the draft, please send to www-international@w3.org.

The XML Localization Interchange File Format (XLIFF) version 2.0 has been approved as an OASIS Standard.

XLIFF is the open standard bi-text format: Bi-text keeps source language and target language data in sync during localization.

The publication of XLIFF 2.0 is of high importance for W3C since several of the main ITS 2.0data categories can be used within XLIFF 2.0 to provide content related information during the localization process. Full ITS 2.0 support is planned for the upcoming XLIFF 2.1 version.

A report summarizing the MultilingualWeb workshop in Madrid is now available from the MultilingualWeb site. It contains a summary of each session with links to presentation slides and minutes taken during the workshop in Madrid. The workshop was a huge success, with approximately 110 participants, and with the associated LIDER roadmapping workshop . The Workshop was hosted by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid , sponsored by the EU-funded LIDER project, by Verisign and by Lionbridge.
A new workshop in the MultilingualWeb series is planned for 2015.

The CSS WG updated the Working Draft of CSS Ruby Layout Module Level 1

This documentbuilds upon on the Character Model for the World Wide Web 1.0: Fundamentals to provide authors of specifications, software developers, and content developers a common reference on string matching on the World Wide Web and thereby increase interoperability. String matching is the process by which a specification or implementation defines whether two string values are the same or different from one another.

The main target audience of this specification is W3C specification developers. This specification and parts of it can be referenced from other W3C specifications and it defines conformance criteria for W3C specifications, as well as other specifications.

This version of this document represents a significant change from its previous edition. Much of the content is changed and the recommendations are significantly altered. This fact is reflected in a change to the name of the document from “Character Model: Normalization” to “Character Model for the World Wide Web: String Matching and Searching”.

This is the 4-11 July 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst (popularity is flagged with a figure —number of times the same URIs or tweet was quoted/RTed.)]

And, on the lighter side

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

5articles since the 4-Jul Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

This is the 20-27 June 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst (popularity is flagged with a figure —number of times the same URIs or tweet was quoted/RTed.)]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

8articles since the 20-Jun Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

This is the 13-20 June 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst (popularity is flagged with a figure —number of times the same URIs or tweet was quoted/RTed.)]

Open Web & net neutrality

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

22articles since the 2-Jun Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippingspage.

In 2012, the HTML Working Group Chairs came up with a plan to progress HTML, aka “ Plan 2014“. The plan has several objectives:

  • Produce a W3C Recommendation for HTML 5.0 before the end of 2014, as well as a W3C Recommendation for HTML 5.1 before the end of 2016;
  • Use the Candidate Recommendation of HTML5, which started in December 2012, to focus the testing effort where it is appropriate;
  • Use modularity to manage the size and complexity of the specifications.

Over the past 2 years, we have continued to refine and improve the HTML 5.0 specification. The HTML Working Group receives and tracks proposals from a variety of people in the community, most prominently from the WHATWG. During the past 2 years, the HTML5 editors have worked with the community to exchange ideas and thus avoid divergence among specifications. The HTML Landscapelists the differences between various HTML specifications.

The HTML Working Group today has 97,000 tests for HTML5. As part of satisfying the W3C process requirements for Candidate Recommendation, we have tracked implementations of HTML5 features, and test results today show that there are at least 2 implementations for 96.7% of the available tests. What about the other 3.3%? Those failures arise from how different browsers handle errors, and the Working Group has concluded that these failures do not reflect differences in implementations that will significantly affect interoperability of real-world running code. Following the test results, we removed several features from HTML 5.0due to their lack of implementations and stability, including the dialog element and scoped style sheet. Those features remain in the draft HTML 5.1 specification for the time being.

W3C would like to thank the community for helping to build this valuable test suite. The tests come from the Test the Web Forward community effort and the contributors to the web-platform-tests github repository, and we strongly encourage Web developers to continue to contribute to the testing effort and help make the Open Web Platform reliable. At the moment, the HTML Working Group is specifically looking for additional HTML 5.0 tests related to media elements and page navigation.

As planned, given the substantive changes made to the document, we’re returning HTML 5.0 to Last Call. The scope of the expected feedback at this point is limited to changes that have taken place during the Candidate Recommendation phase and the deadline is 15 July 2014. Once we have addressed the Last Call comments and finalize the test suite, we expect to move the document to Proposed Recommendation in the fall. A few features may be removed from HTML 5.0 but kept in HTML 5.1 if we can’t get enough implementations: the DataCue interface, <input type=time>, drag and drop, and the new ruby model.

Advancing HTML 5.0 towards Recommendation status is just one step in advancing the Open Web Platform, a full-fledged programming environment for rich, interactive, cross-platform applications, with HTML5 at its core. Several Groups are extending the HTML markup language, including for responsive design, performance, accessibility or additional security purposes. The HTML Working Group, the W3C Technical Architecture Group and the Web Applications Working Group, are looking to have an Extensible Web Summit in the middle of September where we will discuss the future of HTML. We expect a formal announcement in early July.

Version 7.0 of the Unicode Standardis now available, adding 2,834 new characters. This latest version adds the new currency symbols for the Russian ruble and Azerbaijani manat, approximately 250 emoji (pictographic symbols), many other symbols, and 23 new lesser-used and historic scripts, as well as character additions to many existing scripts. These additions extend support for written languages of North America, China, India, other Asian countries, and Africa. See the link above for full details.

Most of the new emoji characters derive from characters in long-standing and widespread use in Wingdings and Webdings fonts.

Major enhancements were made to the Indic script properties. New property values were added to enable a more algorithmic approach to rendering Indic scripts. These include properties for joining behavior, new classes for numbers, and a further division of the syllabic categories of viramas and rephas. With these enhancements, the default rendering for newly added Indic scripts can be significantly improved.

Unicode character properties were extended to the new characters. The old characters have enhancements to Script and Alphabetic properties, and casing and line-breaking behavior. There were also nearly 3,000 new Cantonese pronunciation entries, as well as new or clarified stability policies for promoting interoperable implementations.

Two other important Unicode specifications are maintained in synchrony with the Unicode Standard, and have updates for Version 7.0. These will be released at the same time:

UTS #10, Unicode Collation Algorithm— the standard for sorting Unicode text
UTS #46, Unicode IDNA Compatibility Processing— for processing of non-ASCII URLs (IDNs)

Talks and Appearances Header link

See also the full list of W3C Talks and Appearances.

Events Header link

See full list of W3C Events.