W3C

Web Design and Applications

Web Design and Applications involve the standards for building and Rendering Web pages, including HTML, CSS, SVG, device APIs, and other technologies for Web Applications (“WebApps”). This section also includes information on how to make pages accessible to people with disabilities (WCAG), to internationalize them, and make them work on mobile devices.

HTML & CSS Header link

HTML and CSS are the fundamental technologies for building Web pages: HTML (html and xhtml) for structure, CSS for style and layout, including WebFonts. Find resources for good Web page design as well as helpful tools.

JavaScript Web APIs Header link

Standard APIs for client-side Web Application development include those for Geolocation, XMLHttpRequest, and mobile widgets. W3C standards for document models (the “DOM”) and technologies such as XBL allow content providers to create interactive documents through scripting.

Graphics Header link

W3C is the home of the widely deployed PNG raster format, SVG vector format, and the Canvas API. WebCGM is a more specialized format used, for example, in the fields of automotive engineering, aeronautics.

Audio and Video Header link

Some of the W3C formats that enable authoring audio and video presentations include HTML, SVG, and SMIL (for synchronization). W3C is also working on a timed text format for captioning and other applications.

Accessibility Header link

W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has published Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) to help authors create content that is accessible to people with disabilities. WAI-ARIA gives authors more tools to create accessible Web Applications by providing additional semantics about widgets and behaviors.

Internationalization Header link

W3C has a mission to design technology that works across cultures and languages. W3C standards such as HTML and XML are built on Unicode, for instance. In addition, W3C has published guidance for authors related to language tags bi-directional (bidi) text, and more.

Mobile Web Header link

W3C promotes “One Web” that is available on any device. W3C’s Mobile Web Best Practices help authors understand how to create content that provides a reasonable experience on a wide variety of devices, contexts, and locations.

Privacy Header link

The Web is a powerful tool for communications and transactions of all sorts. It is important to consider privacy and security implications of the Web as part of technology design. Learn more about tracking and Web App security.

Math on the Web Header link

Mathematics and formula are used on the Web for business reports, education materials and scientific research. W3C’s MathML enables mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for other types of content.

News Atom

This is the 4-11 April 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

Nothing stood out particularly this week; I noted a few mentions of:

Open Web & net rights

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

5articles this week. Read more and find keywords on our Press clippings.

See the program.The keynote speaker will be Alolita Sharma, Director of Language Engineering from the Wikimedia Foundation. She is followed by a strong line up in sessions entitled Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, and Users, including speakers from Microsoft, Wikimedia Foundation, the UN FAO, W3C, Yandex, SDL, Lionbridge, Asia Pacific TLD, Verisign, DFKI, and many more. On the afternoon of the second day we will hold Open Space breakout discussions. Abstracts and details about an additional poster session will be provided shortly.

The program will also feature an LD4LT event on May 8-9, focusing on text analytics and the usefulness of Wikipedia and Dbpedia for multiilngual text and content analytics, and on language resources and aspects of converting selected types of language resources into RDF.

Participation in both events is free. See the Call for Participation for details about how to register for the MultilingualWeb workshop. The LD4LT event requires a separate registrationand you have the opportunity to submit position statements about language resources and RDF.

If you haven’t registered yet, note that space is limited, so please be sure to register soon to ensure that you get a place.

The MultilingualWeb workshops, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, look at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The workshops are successful because they attract a wide range of participants, from fields such as localization, language technology, browser development, content authoring and tool development, etc., to create a holistic view of the interoperability needs of the multilingual Web.

We look forward to seeing you in Madrid!

This is the 28 March – 4 April 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

Nothing stood out particularly this week; I noted a few mentions of:

Net Neutrality & Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

6articles this week. A selection follows. Read more and find keywords on our Press clippings.

Register now for the recently announced workshop on Linked Data, Language Technologies and Multilingual Content Analytics (8-9 May, Madrid). A preliminary agenda has been created and the registration formis available.

If you are interested in contributing a position statement please indicate this in the dedicated field in the registration form. The workshop organizers will come back to you with questions to answer in the position statement. We then will select which statements are appropriate for presentations on 9 May, and inform you by 28 April.

We are looking forward to see you in Madrid, both for this event and the MultilingualWeb workshop!

This updatebrings the article in line with recent developments in CSS, and reorganizes the material so that readers can find information more quickly. This led to the article being almost completely rewritten.

The article addresses the question: How do I declare the character encoding of a CSS style sheet?

German, Greek, Spanish, Hebrew, Hungarian, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese translators are asked to update their translation of this article within the next month, otherwise the translations will be removed per the translation policy, since the changes are substantive.

This updatebrings the article in line with recent developments in HTML5, and reorganizes the material so that readers can find information more quickly. This led to the article being almost completely rewritten.

The article addresses the question: Which character encoding should I use for my content, and how do I apply it to my content?

German, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian translators are asked to update their translation of this article within the next month, otherwise the translations will be removed per the translation policy, since the changes are substantive.

This is the 21-28 March 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst (popularity is flagged with a figure —number of times the same URIs or tweet was quoted/RTed.)]

Net Neutrality & Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

6articles this week. A selection follows. Read more and find keywords on our Press clippings.

In line with decisions taken by the Working Group several months ago, the editor’s copies of two Internationalization WG Notes have been significantly changed.

The information has been overhauled to bring it up to date with recent changes to various articles, in line with changes in HTML and CSS.

The new versions have also been paired down to a set of do’s and don’ts, with pointers to more detailed explanations in other articles on the i18n site, plus some introductory material that is not found elsewhere. This significantly reduces duplication of information, and thereby improves usability and maintainability of the content.

The documents in question are:

If you have any comments on these documents, please send them to www-international@w3.orgbefore 12 April. We hope to replace the current versions of these Notes with the new versions shortly after.

Aligned with the MultilingualWeb workshop (7-8 May, Madrid), the LIDER project is organizing a roadmapping workshop 8-9 May . The 8 May afternoon session will provide a keynote by Seth Grimesand also focus on the topic of Wikipedia for multilingual Web content. Via several panels including contributions from key Wikipedia engineers, we will discuss cross lingual analytics and intelligent multilingual content handling in Wikipedia. On 9 May, a 1/2 day session will focus on aspects of migrating language resources into linked data.

Mark your calendar now! A dedicated registration form including ways to contribute to the workshop agenda will be made available soon.

This is the 14-21 March 2014edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recentfirst (popularity is flagged with a figure —number of times the same URIs or tweet was quoted/RTed.)]

Net Neutrality & Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

11articles this week. A selection follows. Find keywords on our Press clippings.

Events Header link

  • 2014-05-07 ( 7 MAY) 2014-05-08 ( 8 MAY)

    Seventh MultilingualWeb Workshop: New Horizons for the Multilingual Web

    Madrid, Spain

    Hosted by UPM

    As with previous MultilingualWeb events, this workshop will bring together speakers and participants with an interest in best practices and standards aimed at helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web. This workshop will emphasize new technology developments that may lead to new opportunities for the Multilingual Web. A unique proposition of the workshop is that it brings together speakers and provides opportunities for networking across a wide range of communities to produce a holistic view of the problems faced in developing and deploying multilingual content and applications on the Web.

  • 2014-05-08 ( 8 MAY) 2014-05-09 ( 9 MAY)

    Media Web Symposium

    Berlin, Germany

    This symposium is supported by W3C and the MediaScape EU project

  • 2014-05-19 (19 MAY) 2014-05-21 (21 MAY)

    WebRTC Working Group Meeting

    Washington DC, USA

    Google

See full list of W3C Events.