W3C

Talks by W3C Speakers (2006)

Many in the W3C community — including staff, chairs, and Member representatives — present W3C work at conferences and other events. Below you will find a list some of the talks. All material is copyright of the author, except where otherwise noted.

January 2006

February 2006

March 2006

April 2006

May 2006

June 2006

July 2006

August 2006

September 2006

October 2006

  • 2006-10-01 (1 OCT)
    Abstract:

    Considering that HTML is the world's most popular document format, it is seriously ill-fitted for information representation purposes.

    After an enormous effort in the 90's to undo the damage caused by mixing content and presentation, it seems like that message is now coming through.

    But there is still a long road to navigate. The tools you use for content delivery can greatly affect what you can achieve, and the amount of work you have to put in to achieve it.

    Do we really want to re-author a site for each type of device that is likely to use it? What are the best ways to meet the challenges of multi-lingual environments and accessibility?

    Work is ongoing at the World Wide Web Consortium W3C on producing markup languages that meet the needs of modern web content, and this talk describes the approach used, and in particular how XHTML2 and XForms meet the challenges of structured content, single authoring, accessibility, and device independence.

  • 2006-10-03 (3 OCT)

    Practical and Cultural Issues in Designing International Websites

    by Richard Ishida, in cooperation with the Spain Office

    Fundamentos Web 2006

    Oviedo, Asturias, Spain

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    If you are a designer, developer or author working on a website that may be translated or adapted for users in other countries or languages, you need to ensure that you don't build in substantial barriers to localization. If you think that the translation vendor or localization team can take care of things for you when the time comes, you really need to hear this talk. We will use examples to examine some of the things that must be designed into the site, rather than treated as an afterthought, if it is to be successfully deployed in more than one language or country.

  • 2006-10-11 (11 OCT)
  • 2006-10-12 (12 OCT)

    WCAG 2.0 im Entwicklungsprozess (WCAG 2.0 in the Development Process)

    by Shadi Abou-Zahra

    Warum barrierefreies Internet
    (Why Barrier Free Internet)

    Vienna, Austria

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2006-10-16 (16 OCT)

    State of the Semantic Web

    by Ivan Herman

    IBM China Research Lab

    Beijing, China

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

  • 2006-10-17 (17 OCT)

    CSS Paged Media

    by Bert Bos, in cooperation with the Germany and Austria Office

    W3C Print Symposium 2006

    Heidelberg, Germany

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    An overview of various features in CSS that are important for printing and their current status of development and deployment.
  • 2006-10-18 (18 OCT)
  • 2006-10-19 (19 OCT)

    CSS for Developers (tutorial)

    by Molly E. Holzschlag and Andy Clarke

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    A one-day workshop designed to cover technical aspects of CSS. It's aimed at developers but also anyone who wants to build highly flexible, easily manageable, standards-based websites with CSS and XHTML should attend. It's an in-depth course, taught by two of the most well-known advocates of standards and accessibility.
  • 2006-10-20 (20 OCT)

    Estándares en la Web (Standards in the Web)

    by Martín Álvarez

    Curso de Desarrollo de Aplicaciones Informáticas (Universidad Laboral)
    (Course in Application Developing )

    Gijón, Spain

  • 2006-10-24 (24 OCT)
  • 2006-10-26 (26 OCT)

    Accesibilidad Web (Web Accessibility)

    by Jesús García

    Escuela de Ingeniería Técnica Informática, Universidad de Oviedo

    Oviedo, Spain

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2006-10-26 (26 OCT)

    El W3C y la nueva Web (W3C and the new Web)

    by José Manuel Alonso

    Escuela de Ingeniería Técnica Informática, Universidad de Oviedo

    Oviedo, Spain

  • 2006-10-26 (26 OCT)

    The Internationalisation Tag Set - What Happened Next

    by Richard Ishida

    LRC XI

    Dublin, Ireland

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    The Internationalization Tag Set (ITS) work at the W3C, led by Yves Savourel, defines a standard to support better internationalisation and localisation of schemas and XML documents (both existing and new ones). The standard proposes a set of data categories, for which it then defines implementations as a set of elements and attributes. It also provides examples of how ITS can be used with popular existing markup schemes such as DocBook and DITA, and in three schema languages, XML DTDs, XML Schema, and RELAX NG.

    The first version of the standard is nearing completion. It addresses how to identify translatable vs. non-translatable content, localisation notes, terminology references, directionality of text, language markup, inline elements, and ruby annotation.

    The aim is to ensure that XML formats support features needed for international use and for efficient localisation. It should also make the job of vendors easier by standardising the format and processing expectations of localisation-related markup items, and allowing translation tools to more effectively identify how content should be handled.

    The talk will use examples to acquaint you better with ITS and its relevance to the localisation community.

  • 2006-10-27 (27 OCT)

    Semantic Web to Help Combine your Bio Data

    by Marie-Claire Forgue

    EuroBio 2006

    Paris, France

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

November 2006

December 2006

  • 2006-12-04 (4 DEC)
  • 2006-12-04 (4 DEC)
  • 2006-12-04 (4 DEC)
  • 2006-12-04 (4 DEC)

    Innovations in Mobile Web Clients

    by Charles McCathieNeville

    Relevant technology area: Web of Devices.

  • 2006-12-04 (4 DEC)

    Embracing Device Diversity

    by Kirk Tang

    Relevant technology area: Web of Devices.

  • 2006-12-05 (5 DEC)
    Abstract:
    The W3C XForms Recommendation provides a standard markup language for documents that allow content creation into the XML data structures that drive business-oriented web applications. The XForms architecture provides an open platform for expressing the core processing model and view of XML data while delegating presentation to a host language most suited to application-specific requirements. This architecture presents an interesting security challenge for digital signatures, which must protect not only data but also its presentation. The W3C XML Signatures Recommendation provides a standardized markup language for expressing digital signatures in XML that secure both XML and binary resources. The usage patterns and features of this language are designed to support the full range of security requirements, so it is important for all features of XML Signatures to be available to XForms-based document authors. Prior researchers have presented an integration of XML Signatures and XForms in which the XForms processor generated an enveloping signature containing the XML data and references to all external resources used to present the data. The solution is good at creating a single signature that follows the XML Signatures maxim "What you see is what you sign." However, due to validating signature only on the server, the non-repudiable nature of the signatures is not well-preserved when later users view the signed information. In essence, the system does not adhere to the corollary of the above maxim: "What you validate is what you see." On the client-side, core validation must not only occur, but it must be augmented to ensure that signed resources are the ones being used to present the document. One challenging aspect of this unification stems from the design of XForms, in which XML instance data is separated from the document and processed independently. Since the signatures must be added to the data, the XML signature processing model uses the separated data as the resolution to same-document references, not the XForms document containing the data. This paper includes an answer for this problem, which enables document-centric XForms host languages to consume the signature solution. Client-side validation flushes out another issue: multiple signer scenarios. In these cases, the XForms author needs the flexibility to author the references and transforms of the XML signature, which is not possible if the XForms processor generates the references and transforms. Finally, there should be strong encapsulation that separates the XForms processor, the host language processor and the user agent. The above prior solution assumed that XForms processor has access to the resources at all of these levels. Instead, due to the XForms design principle of host language independence, the containing document and user agent must be allowed to participate in the sign and validate operations initiated by the XForms processor. This paper presents an architectural framework that fully unifies XForms and XML signatures while allowing for host language independence. Moreover, the form author is given control over the type of signature, what it signs, and how it selects the signed content.
  • 2006-12-05 (5 DEC)

    W3C XML Schema Patterns for Databinding

    by Paul Downey

    XML 2006

    Boston, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web of Services.

    Abstract:
    This talk charts the progress of the W3C XML Schema Patterns for Databinding Working Group which aims to improve the interoperability of XML Schema 1.0, particularly when used as a description language for Web services.
  • 2006-12-06 (6 DEC)
    Abstract:

    The demand for automated or assisted Web service discovery and invocation prompted the development of the Web Services Policy framework (WS-Policy), a general purpose framework for expressing requirements, capabilities, and general characteristics for invoking a particular Web service, such as security or reliability requirements. The WS-Policy language is limited to AND and OR and functions named by QNames. Simple boolean logic allows one to discover equivalent policies and to test whether a particular connection conforms to a given policy.

    While any language with AND, OR and named functions subsumes WS-Policy's expressiveness, the most interesting are those that are, intuitive, sound, and extensible. A variety of current schema (W3C XML Schema and OWL) and query languages (XQuery and SPARQL) meet these requirements to varying degrees. This paper will demonstrate and contrast expressions of Web service policies in these languages.

    SPARQL and XQuery are query languages for two data different models. The current definition of WS-Policy does not presume any particular expression of service or library capabilities into any data model. All that's required is that some mechanism be able to recognize a policy and verify compliance of the available software modules. For example, this could be hard coded into an agent. Query languages like SPARQL and XQuery are designed to intuitively expression boolean logic. Using, for instance, SPARQL to express policies implies a mapping of agent capabilities into an RDF graph. Likewise, expressing agent capabilities in XML allows one to query them with XQuery.

    We will describe the ways in which these languages all exceed this simple AND, OR, named function expressivity and discuss the applicability of this extra expressivity to describing Web service policies, or Web services in general. Importing this expertise from other domains informs us about potential policy expressivity. We will identify additional use cases met by adopting this additional expressivity.

  • 2006-12-06 (6 DEC)
  • 2006-12-07 (7 DEC)

    Web 4.0: Start Planning Now!

    by Steven Pemberton

    Séminaire X/Aristote "Du Web 2.0 au Web 3.0 et au-delà"
    (From Web 2.0 to Web 3.0 and beyond)

    Paris, France

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2006-12-08 (8 DEC)

    WEB 2.0 for Portals (Panel) (panel)

    by Klaus Birkenbihl

    Bildungsportale: Potenziale und Perspektiven
    (Educational Portals: potentials and perspectives)

    Tübingen, Germany

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

  • 2006-12-11 (11 DEC)

    Accessibility: Better, Faster, Cheaper

    by Shawn Henry

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    Accessibility is now a requirement in many Web development projects. Unfortunately, many designers are struggling and see accessibility as a heavy burden. This session will help you turn that around. Join us for tips on optimizing your accessibility efforts, such as focusing on the black and white areas of accessibility to avoid getting bogged down in the gray murk. Get specific guidance on demonstrating the business case for accessibility, and putting accessibility on a higher level within your organization. Learn how to collaborate with people with disabilities in order to better understand accessibility issues and be more efficient in implementing effective accessibility solutions.
  • 2006-12-11 (11 DEC)

    Accessibility in a Web 2.0 World

    by Shawn Henry

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    Web 2.0, Ajax, rich Web applications, blogs, wikis — the Web continues to develop. What are the accessibility issues in this next-generation Web? Scripting, once a no-no for accessibility, is a key aspect. Join us to get the latest on how the W3C's new Web Content Accessibility Guidelines and Authoring Tools Accessibility Guidelines address these Web developments. Learn how to take advantage of current and developing strategies to make dynamic Web content and applications accessible.

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