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Web Architecture

Web Architecture focuses on the foundation technologies and principles which sustain the Web, including URIs and HTTP.

Architecture Principles Header link

Web Architecture principles help to design technologies by providing guidance and articulating the issues around some specific choices.

Identifiers Header link

We share things by their names. URL, URI, IRI is the way to name things on the Web and manipulate them. Some additional addressing needs in the Web Services stack motivated some additional layers.

Protocols Header link

Protocols are the vehicle for exchanging our ideas. HTTP is the core protocol of the Web. W3C is also working on XML Protocols and SOAP in relation to Web Services.

Meta Formats Header link

XML, the Extensible Markup Language, is used to build new formats at low cost (due to widely available tools to manipulate content in those new formats). RDF and OWL allow people to define vocabularies (“ontologies”) of terms as part of the Semantic Web.

Protocol and Meta Format Considerations Header link

Documents on the Web are loosely joined pieces by identifiers. It creates a maze of rich interactions between protocols and formats.

Internationalization Header link

W3C has worked with the community on the internationalization of identifiers (IRIs) and a general character model for the Web.

News Atom

For twenty-five years the Internationalization & Unicode® Conference (IUC) has been the preeminent event highlighting the latest innovations and best practices of global and multilingual software providers. The 40th conference will be held this year on November 1-3, 2016 in Santa Clara, California.

The deadline for speaker submissions is Monday, 4 April, so don’t forget to send in an abstract if you want to speak at the conference.

The Program Committee will notify authors by Friday, May 13, 2016. Final presentation materials will be required from selected presenters by Friday, July 22, 2016.

Tutorial Presenters receive complimentary conference registration, and two nights lodging, while Session Presenters receive a fifty percent conference discount and two nights lodging.

FREME  is a project that is developing a  Framework  for multilingual and semantic enrichment of digital content. A key aspect of the framework is that it puts standards and best practices in the area of  linguistic linked data  and multilingual content processing in action. We will introduce the framework in a dedicated webinar on 22 February, 4 p.m. CET. If you are interested in participating please contact  Nieves Sande  and  Felix Sasaki for further logistics.

The TAG has been engaging with the developer community through evening meetups and longer “summit” events. We’ve so far run three “ extensible web summit” events, two in San Francisco and one in Berlin, Our next face-to-face meeting is coming up in Melbourne in January 2016 and we thought we’d take advantage of this opportunity to meet and get feedback from the vibrant web developer community there.

So…with the help of our hosts at RMIT, we’re going to run a half-day developer event and un-conference: “ Extensible Web Summit, Melbourne Edition .” This will be a half-day event in the afternoon of the 12 thof January. If you want to find out more about the ethos behind the Extensible Web Summit, please visit our page at extensiblewebsummit.org.

Topics to be discussed will include the  Extensible Web Manifesto  as well as other new and emerging web technologies and standards.

The Summit is free to attend and depends heavily on participant engagement. After the lightning talks, participants will create the schedule for a set of parallel breakout sessions. These discussions will be moderated and will be minuted, with the intention of informing future work.

Please registerif you would like to attend. We hope to see you there!

At the recent W3C TPAC meeting the TAG convened a special session to discuss, among other things, Cory Doctorow’s call for a “non-agression covenant.” The concern Cory has voiced is related to the unintended consequences of certain pieces of legislation which have had a chilling effecton security research on software. Although Cory’s concerns have mostly been related the implementation of Encrypted Media Extensions, we believe there is a larger architectural issue at stake which needs to be called out. The TAG therefore agreed the following resolution:

The Web has been built through iteration and collaboration, and enjoys strong security because so many people are able to continually test and review its designs and implementations. As the Web gains interfaces to new device capabilities, we rely even more on broad participation, testing, and audit to keep users safe and the web’s security model intact. Therefore, W3C policy should assure that such broad testing and audit continues to be possible, as it is necessary to keep both design and implementation quality high.

The Internationalization Working Group has published a First Public Working Draft of Internationalization Best Practices for Spec Developers.

This document provides a checklist of internationalization-related considerations when developing a specification. Most checklist items point to detailed supporting information in other documents. Where such information does not yet exist, it can be given a temporary home in this document. The dynamic page Internationalization Techniques: Developing specificationsis automatically generated from this document.

The current version is still a very early draft, and it is expected that the information will change regularly as new content is added and existing content is modified in the light of experience and discussion.

The EncodingCandidate Recommendation has been updated to take into account changes made to the editor’s draft since its initial publication as a Candidate Recommendation. These changes are largely due to issues discovered during implementation. This is a snapshot of the WHATWG document, as of 29 September 2015 and no changes have been made from the original in the body of the document other than to align with W3C house styles.

If you wish to make comments regarding this document, please raise them as github issues against the latest editor’s draft. Only send comments by email to www-international@w3.org if you are unable to raise issues on github. All comments are welcome.

The utf-8 encoding is the most appropriate encoding for interchange of Unicode, the universal coded character set. Therefore for new protocols and formats, as well as existing formats deployed in new contexts, this specification requires (and defines) the utf-8 encoding.

The other (legacy) encodings have been defined to some extent in the past. However, user agents have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification addresses those gaps so that new user agents do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations and existing user agents can converge.

In the last two years, the  LIDER project  has organized several  roadmapping events  to gather a broad community around the topic of linguistic linked data. On October 20th 2015 LIDER will engage with two selected communities: linguistics and experts in digital humanities, via a national roadmapping workshop that will take place in Spain. The  7th LIDER roadmapping workshop  will focus on these topics and will be held in Madrid at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. The participation will be free and open. Spanish will be the main language of the event. For more information also about participation please visit the workshop website  http://lider-project.eu/workshopMadrid/

In the last two years, the  LIDER project  has organized several  roadmapping events  to gather a broad community around the topic of linguistic linked data. In October this year, LIDER will engage with two selected communities: linguistics and experts in digital humanities, via a national roadmapping workshop that will take place in Spain. The  7th LIDER roadmapping workshop  will focus on these topics and will be held in Madrid at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. The participation will be free and open. Spanish will be the main language of the event. For more information also about participation please visit the workshop website  http://lider-project.eu/workshopMadrid/

A report summarizing the MultilingualWeb workshop in Riga is now available from the MultilingualWeb site. It contains a summary of each session with links to presentation slides and minutes taken during the workshop in Riga. The workshop was a huge success. With the parallel Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) event, it had more than 200 registered participants. See a summary of highlights , and a dedicated report about outreach activities of the supporting EU funded LIDER project . The Workshop was locally organized by Tilde , sponsored by the LIDER project and by Verisign . Learn more about the Internationalization Activity.

In the last 1 1/2 years, the LIDER project has organized several roadmapping events to gather a broad community around the topic of linguistic linked data. In July this year, LIDER will engage with two selected communities. On July 6, the 5th LIDER roadmapping workshop will be held in Rome at Sapienza University of Rome . The topic will be cross-media linked data and the event will provide several high level speakers from the multimedia area. On July 13th LIDER will organize the 6th roadmappping workshopin Munich. The event will be hosted by Siemens and will focus on content analytics and linked data in healthcare and medicine.

For both workshops participation is limited. If you are interested in the Rome event please contact Tiziano Flati , for Munich please contact Philipp Cimiano.

Talks and Appearances Header link

See also the full list of W3C Talks and Appearances.

Events Header link

  • 2017-04-03 ( 3 APR) 2017-04-07 ( 7 APR)

    WWW2017

    Perth, Australia

See full list of W3C Events.