W3C

Web Architecture

Web Architecture focuses on the foundation technologies and principles which sustain the Web, including URIs and HTTP.

Architecture Principles Header link

Web Architecture principles help to design technologies by providing guidance and articulating the issues around some specific choices.

Identifiers Header link

We share things by their names. URL, URI, IRI is the way to name things on the Web and manipulate them. Some additional addressing needs in the Web Services stack motivated some additional layers.

Protocols Header link

Protocols are the vehicle for exchanging our ideas. HTTP is the core protocol of the Web. W3C is also working on XML Protocols and SOAP in relation to Web Services.

Meta Formats Header link

XML, the Extensible Markup Language, is used to build new formats at low cost (due to widely available tools to manipulate content in those new formats). RDF and OWL allow people to define vocabularies (“ontologies”) of terms as part of the Semantic Web.

Protocol and Meta Format Considerations Header link

Documents on the Web are loosely joined pieces by identifiers. It creates a maze of rich interactions between protocols and formats.

Internationalization Header link

W3C has worked with the community on the internationalization of identifiers (IRIs) and a general character model for the Web.

News Atom

On April 4 th, with the much-appreciated help and support of Adobe Systems, the TAG organized an event in San Francisco called the Extensible Web Summit. As I wrote before the event, the intention was to bring together web developers and web platform developers from the local area to discuss upcoming, in-development web platform technologies and standards both to throw a spotlight on some of the topics we think are key and to guide the TAG’s thinking. Judging from the feedback we’ve received, I we achieved these goals and more.

There were quite a few positive views shared on Twitter, including:

…and the summit has inspired a few blog posts, from Alan Sterns , Brian Kardell  and Simon St. Laurent.

The final schedule of sessions and links to the unfiltered notes from these sessions can be found on the Lanyrd pagefor the event. Thanks again to everyone who came along! Based on the feedback we received, I think it’s likely we’ll be running events in the future in the same format. Watch this space and follow @w3ctagon Twitter to keep up to date.

See the program.The keynote speaker will be Alolita Sharma, Director of Language Engineering from the Wikimedia Foundation. She is followed by a strong line up in sessions entitled Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, and Users, including speakers from Microsoft, Wikimedia Foundation, the UN FAO, W3C, Yandex, SDL, Lionbridge, Asia Pacific TLD, Verisign, DFKI, and many more. On the afternoon of the second day we will hold Open Space breakout discussions. Abstracts and details about an additional poster session will be provided shortly.

The program will also feature an LD4LT event on May 8-9, focusing on text analytics and the usefulness of Wikipedia and Dbpedia for multiilngual text and content analytics, and on language resources and aspects of converting selected types of language resources into RDF.

Participation in both events is free. See the Call for Participation for details about how to register for the MultilingualWeb workshop. The LD4LT event requires a separate registrationand you have the opportunity to submit position statements about language resources and RDF.

If you haven’t registered yet, note that space is limited, so please be sure to register soon to ensure that you get a place.

The MultilingualWeb workshops, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, look at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The workshops are successful because they attract a wide range of participants, from fields such as localization, language technology, browser development, content authoring and tool development, etc., to create a holistic view of the interoperability needs of the multilingual Web.

We look forward to seeing you in Madrid!

We’re running an event on Friday the 4 thof April in San Francisco and you’re invited.

For the past year, along-side our regular face-to-face meetings, the TAG has been holding evening developer meet-ups under the moniker “Meet the TAG.” The radical idea has been to take advantage of the fact that our meetings are happening in cities with large concentrations of Web developers to connect with these developer communities in a meaningful and useful way. The hopeful outcome is to both keep developers informed about what we’re doing, presumably on their behalf, with their platform, and to drive some feedback back into the TAG to help guide our thinking and our work. The results have generally been good, generating useful  criticism and feedbackwhich we’ve tried to take on board, and making the TAG less of an echo chamber. In the mean time we’ve met lots of developers who take a keen interest in web architecture and the future of the web platform.

For our next face-to-face meeting in San Francisco, we’re planning to expand this idea to a full-fledged one-day event, bringing in web developers and web platformdevelopers, people who are deeply invested in the web platform but may not be participating directly in standards. We’re calling this event the Extensible Web Summit.

As Twitter denizen Daniel Buchner put it:

@briankardell  @wycats  @w3ctag are you telling me we’re going to try developing API “products” using direct “customer” feedback? Mind = blown

— Daniel Buchner (@csuwildcat)  December 9, 2013

The web is 25 years old. What do we want this platform to look like 25 years from now? This event will bring together web platform developers and practitioners from different communities and backgrounds to focus on the future of the web architecture and platform. With the exception of some curated lightning talks at the beginning of the day to set the scene, the event will be run as an unconference, with the agenda self-organized by the participants. We’d like to thank Adobe Systems for stepping forward as our host for this event.

Who should attend? We would ideally like to pack this event with platform developers, framework developers and web developers with an interest in helping to drive the future of the web platform. If you read and liked what you saw in the  Extensible Web Manifesto  and you’d like to learn more and influence the direction of this thinking, then we’d love to have you along. Likewise if you are interested in other web technologies such as real time communication, platform & device APIs, security, permissions, manifests & packaging, offline usage, JavaScript promises & streams, push notifications and touch. The event is free to attend, but is filling up fast. If this sounds like your cup of tea, visit our Lanyrd pageand grab a ticket.

We would like to remind you that the deadline for speaker proposals for the 7th MultilingualWeb Workshop (May 7–8, 2014, Madrid, Spain) is on Friday, March 14, at 23:59 UTC.

Featuring a keynote by Alolita Sharma (Director of Engineering, Wikipedia) and breakout sessions on linked open data and other critical topics, this Workshop will focus on the advances and challenges faced in making the Web truly multilingual. It provides an outstanding and influential forum for thought leaders to share their ideas and gain critical feedback.

While the organizers have already received many excellent submissions, there is still time to make a proposal, and we encourage interested parties to do so by the deadline. With roughly 200 attendees anticipated for the Workshop from a wide variety of profiles, we are certain to have a large and diverse audience that can provide constructive and useful feedback, with stimulating discussion about all of the presentations.

For more information and to register, please visit the Madrid Workshop Call for Participation.

We are please to announce that Alolita Sharma, Director of Engineering for Internationalization and Localization at Wikipedia, will deliver the keynote at the 7th Multilingual Web Workshop, “New Horizons for the Multilingual Web,” in Madrid, Spain (7–8 May 2014).

With over 30 million articles in 286 languages as of January 1, 2014, Wikipedia has now become one of the largest providers of multilingual content in the world. Because of its user-generated and constantly changing content, many traditional processes for managing multilingual content on the web either do not work or do not scale well for Wikipedia. Alolita Sharma’s keynote will highlight Wikipedia’s diversity in multilingual user-generated content and the language technologies that Wikipedia has had to develop to support its unprecedented growth of content. She will also discuss the many challenges Wikipedia faces in providing language support for the mobile web.

The Multilingual Web Workshop series brings together participants interested in the best practices, new technologies, and standards needed to help content creators, localizers, language tools developers, and others address the new opportunities and challenges of the multilingual Web. It will provide for networking across communities and building connections.

Registration for the Workshop is free, and early registrationis recommended since space at the Workshop is limited.

There is still opportunity for individuals to submit proposals to speak at the workshop. Ideal proposals will highlight emerging challenges or novel solutions for reaching out to a global, multilingual audience. The deadline for speaker proposals is March 14, but early submission is strongly encouraged. See the Call for Participationfor more details.

This workshop is made possible by the generous support of the LIDER project, which will organize a roadmapping workshop on linked data and content analytics as one of the tracks at Multilingual Web Workshop.

The LD4LT (Linked Data for Language Technology) Workshop will be held on 21 March, in Athens, Greece, aligned with the European Data Forum 2014 . See the agenda.

The workshop is a free community event – there is no admission fee for participants, but registration is required.

You are encouraged to provide a title for a position statement in your registration form. This is a simple, short statement that summarizes your ideas / technologies / use cases related to Linked Data and Language Technology.

The meeting is supported by the LIDER project, the MultilingualWeb community , the NLP2RDF project , the Working Group for Open Data in Linguistics as well as the DBpedia Project.

As input to the discussion and the work of the LD4LT group, you may also want to fill in the first LIDER survey.

The Internationalization Working Group has published a First Public Working Draft of Encoding.

While encodings have been defined to some extent, implementations have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification attempts to fill those gaps so that new implementations do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations of the market leaders and existing implementations can converge.

This is a snapshot of the Encoding Living Standard, as of the date shown on the title page. No changes have been made in the body of the W3C draft other than to align with W3C house styles. The primary reason that W3C is publishing this document is so that HTML5 and other specifications may normatively refer to a stable W3C Recommendation.

Register early to ensure you get a place. Anyone may attend all sessions at no charge and the W3C welcomes participation by both speakers and non-speaking attendees.

Since 2010 the W3C’s Multilingual Web Workshop series has become the preeminent venue for discussion of the standards and technologies that define and enable multilingualism on the Web. The 7th Workshop, “New Horizons for the Multilingual Web,” will be held 7–8 May 2014 in Madrid, Spain.

The workshop brings together participants interested in the best practices, new technologies, and standards needed to help content creators, localizers, language tools developers, and others address the new opportunities and challenges of the multilingual Web. It will provide for networking across communities and building connections.

We are particularly interested in speakers who are facing emerging challenges or who can demonstrate novel solutions for reaching out to a global, multilingual audience. The deadline for speaker proposals is March 14, but early submission is strongly encouraged.

This workshop is made possible by the generous support of the LIDER project, which will organize a roadmapping workshop on linked data and content analyticsas one of the tracks at Multilingual Web Workshop.

See the Call for Participation and register online.

To be held 7-8 May 2014in Madrid, Spain, W3C announced today the seventh MultilingualWeb workshop in a series of eventsexploring the mechanisms and processes needed to ensure that the World Wide Web lives up to its potential around the world and across barriers of language and culture.

This workshop is made possible by the generous support of the LIDER project. As part of the event, LIDER will organize a roadmapping workshop on linked data and content analytics.

Anyone may attend all sessions at no charge and the W3C welcomes participation by both speakers and non-speaking attendees. Early registration is encouraged due to limited space.

Building on the success of six highly regarded previous workshops, this workshop will emphasize new technology developments that lead to new opportunities for the Multilingual Web. The workshop brings together participants interested in the best practices and standards needed to help content creators, localizers, language tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web. It provides further opportunities for networking across communities. We are particularly interested in speakers who can demonstrate novel solutions for reaching out to a global, multilingual audience.

See the Call for Participation and register online.

Within the W3C, the TAG is chartered with the “stewardship” of Web Architecture:

  • to document and build consensus around principles of Web architecture and to interpret and clarify these principles when necessary;
  • to resolve issues involving general Web architecture brought to the TAG;
  • to help coordinate cross-technology architecture developments inside and outside W3C.

It’s one thing to be a steward of something fairly stable, but the Web is currently in a process of upheaval unknown since its inception nearly 20 years ago. Among the challenges we are currently facing are the rise of mobile platforms and accompanying changes in the way people are finding, interacting with and producing services and content on the Internet; the increasing maturity of HTML5 which has been produced and developed under a new model between W3C and the WhatWG; the maturity of Web applications and the rise in importance of JavaScript in the Web platform and the increasing maturity and complexity of video, 2d and 3d graphics and peer to peer communications as first class citizens of the Web. The Web is under existential threat from native mobile application development approaches  and at the same time there has never been a time of greater innovation and energy in the development of the Web technologies and standards.

Against this backdrop, the challenges of stewardship of the Web Architecture become clear.

This past year, the TAG has sought to have greater and more connections with other W3C working groups developing these new technologies, as well as with groups external to W3C including IETF working groups and ECMA’s TC39. We have also sought a stronger line of communication directly to Web developers, particularly those in the Web development community who are interested in seeing a continuance to a coherent architecture of the World Wide Web. In order to continue and expand this mission the TAG is peopled by members who come from a diverse range of backgrounds who are put forward by their organizations to help us in this work; to take responsibility for this stewardship by spending their time and energy in benefit of the Web platform.

The TAG is now in an election cycle and one of our long-serving members, Henry Thompson of the University of Edinburgh, will not be standing for another term. We’re sad to see Henry go, but his departure underscores  the importance of the election cycle. As per W3C process , W3C member organizations are responsible for nominating individuals to run in the TAG election. As a co-chair of the TAG, I encourage you to take this opportunity to influence the future make-up and priorities of the TAG. For the last two election cycles, individuals have written position statements, examples of which can be found here , here and here. These position statements have proven very useful even post-election as a way to help shape the agenda of the TAG. Your W3C Advisory Committee representative must make the nomination. Even if you are not affiliated with a W3C member organization, you can still participate in this process if you have a W3C member organization nominate you and if you are able to commit the time and participate in the meetings. The deadline for nominations is 23:59, Boston time on 29 November 2013.

For those of you attending the W3C TPAC week next week in Shenzhen, if you want to ask any questions in person feel free to ask me or one of the other TAG members attending TPAC. We will also be up on stage during the main technical plenary on Wednesday (currently scheduled for 11:00). If you’re not attending TPAC, feel free to get in touch on the public TAG list , by email, Twitter , carrier pigeonor similar.