W3C

Browsers and Authoring Tools

The web's usefulness and growth depends on its universality. We should be able to publish regardless of the software we use, the computer we have, the language we speak, whether we are wired or wireless, regardless of our sensory or interaction modes. We should be able to access the web from any kind of hardware that can connect to the Internet – stationary or mobile, small or large. W3C facilitates this listening and blending via international web standards. These standards ensure that all the crazy brilliance continues to improve a web that is open to us all.

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There are many types of tools that allow us to read the Web, including browsers, media players, publishing platforms, social networks, bots, aggregators, forums, and media-sharing sites.

Authoring Tools, Social Media Header link

The Web is not a read-only medium. There are many types of tools for publishing content, including authoring tools and environments, content management systems (CMSs), social media profile pages and apps, blogging tools and sites, microblogging tools, social bookmarks, forums, and video and photo sharing and more.

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This documentbuilds upon on the Character Model for the World Wide Web 1.0: Fundamentals to provide authors of specifications, software developers, and content developers a common reference on string matching on the World Wide Web and thereby increase interoperability. String matching is the process by which a specification or implementation defines whether two string values are the same or different from one another.

The main target audience of this specification is W3C specification developers. This specification and parts of it can be referenced from other W3C specifications and it defines conformance criteria for W3C specifications, as well as other specifications.

This version of this document represents a significant change from its previous edition. Much of the content is changed and the recommendations are significantly altered. This fact is reflected in a change to the name of the document from “Character Model: Normalization” to “Character Model for the World Wide Web: String Matching and Searching”.

The 4th LIDER roadmapping workshop and LD4LT event will take place on September 2nd in Leipzig, Germany. It will be collocated with the SEMANTiCS conference.

The goal of the workshop is to gather input from experts and stakeholders in the area of content analytics, to identify areas and tasks in content analytics where linked data & semantic technologies can contribute. The workshop will organised as part of MLODE 2014 and will be preceded by a hackathonon the 1st of September.

The event is supported by the LIDER EU project, the MultilingualWeb community, the NLP2RDF project as well as the DBpediaProject.

Version 7.0 of the Unicode Standardis now available, adding 2,834 new characters. This latest version adds the new currency symbols for the Russian ruble and Azerbaijani manat, approximately 250 emoji (pictographic symbols), many other symbols, and 23 new lesser-used and historic scripts, as well as character additions to many existing scripts. These additions extend support for written languages of North America, China, India, other Asian countries, and Africa. See the link above for full details.

Most of the new emoji characters derive from characters in long-standing and widespread use in Wingdings and Webdings fonts.

Major enhancements were made to the Indic script properties. New property values were added to enable a more algorithmic approach to rendering Indic scripts. These include properties for joining behavior, new classes for numbers, and a further division of the syllabic categories of viramas and rephas. With these enhancements, the default rendering for newly added Indic scripts can be significantly improved.

Unicode character properties were extended to the new characters. The old characters have enhancements to Script and Alphabetic properties, and casing and line-breaking behavior. There were also nearly 3,000 new Cantonese pronunciation entries, as well as new or clarified stability policies for promoting interoperable implementations.

Two other important Unicode specifications are maintained in synchrony with the Unicode Standard, and have updates for Version 7.0. These will be released at the same time:

UTS #10, Unicode Collation Algorithm— the standard for sorting Unicode text
UTS #46, Unicode IDNA Compatibility Processing— for processing of non-ASCII URLs (IDNs)

A Last Call Working Draft of Encodinghas been published.

While encodings have been defined to some extent, implementations have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification attempts to fill those gaps so that new implementations do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations of the market leaders and existing implementations can converge.

The body of this spec is an exact copy of the WHATWG version as of the date of its publication, intended to provide a stable reference for other specifications. We are hoping for people to review the specification and send comments about any technical areas that need attention (see the Status section for details).

Please send comments by 1 July 2014.

On 4 June and as part of the Localization World conference in Dublin, the FEISGILTT event will again provide an opportunity to discuss latest developments around localization and multilingual Web technologies. The event is sponsored by the LIDER project.

Highlights include updates about ITS 2.0 and XLIFF 2.0, and a session about usage scenarios for linguistic linked data in localization. Speakers include Kevin O’Donnell (Microsoft), Bryan Schnabel (Tektronix), Yves Savourel (Enlaso) and many more.

Register nowto meet the key players around standards that will influence today’s and future business.

The slides from the MultilingualWeb workshop (including several posters) and the LIDER roadmapping workshopare now available for download. Additional material (videos of the presentations, a workshop report and more) will follow in the next weeks – stay tuned.

The MultilingualWeb workshop on 7-8 May will be streamed live ! Follow the event online if you cannot make it to Madrid. For details about speakers and presentations see the workshop program . The workshop is supported by the LIDER project and sponsored by Verisign and Lionbridge.

See the program.The keynote speaker will be Alolita Sharma, Director of Language Engineering from the Wikimedia Foundation. She is followed by a strong line up in sessions entitled Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, and Users, including speakers from Microsoft, Wikimedia Foundation, the UN FAO, W3C, Yandex, SDL, Lionbridge, Asia Pacific TLD, Verisign, DFKI, and many more. On the afternoon of the second day we will hold Open Space breakout discussions. Abstracts and details about an additional poster session will be provided shortly.

The program will also feature an LD4LT event on May 8-9, focusing on text analytics and the usefulness of Wikipedia and Dbpedia for multiilngual text and content analytics, and on language resources and aspects of converting selected types of language resources into RDF.

Participation in both events is free. See the Call for Participation for details about how to register for the MultilingualWeb workshop. The LD4LT event requires a separate registrationand you have the opportunity to submit position statements about language resources and RDF.

If you haven’t registered yet, note that space is limited, so please be sure to register soon to ensure that you get a place.

The MultilingualWeb workshops, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, look at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The workshops are successful because they attract a wide range of participants, from fields such as localization, language technology, browser development, content authoring and tool development, etc., to create a holistic view of the interoperability needs of the multilingual Web.

We look forward to seeing you in Madrid!

Register now for the recently announced workshop on Linked Data, Language Technologies and Multilingual Content Analytics (8-9 May, Madrid). A preliminary agenda has been created and the registration formis available.

If you are interested in contributing a position statement please indicate this in the dedicated field in the registration form. The workshop organizers will come back to you with questions to answer in the position statement. We then will select which statements are appropriate for presentations on 9 May, and inform you by 28 April.

We are looking forward to see you in Madrid, both for this event and the MultilingualWeb workshop!

Unicode CLDR 25 has been released, providing an update to the key building blocks for software supporting the world’s languages. This data is used by a wide spectrum of companies for their software internationalization and localization, adapting software to the conventions of different languages for such common software tasks.

Unicode CLDR 25 focused primarily on improvements to the LDML structure and tools, and on consistency of data. There are many smaller data fixes, but there was no general data submission. Changes include the following:

  • New rules for plural ranges (1-2 liters) for 72 locales, plurals for 2 locales, and ordinals for 18 locales.
  • Better locale matching with fallbacks for languages, default languages for continents and subcontinents, and default scripts for more languages.
  • Two new locales: West Frisian (fy) and Uyghur (ug).
  • Two new metazones: Mexico_Pacific and Mexico_Northwest
  • Updated zh pinyin & zhuyin collations and translators for Unicode 6.3 kMandarin data
  • Updated keyboard layout data for OSX, Windows and others.

This version contains data for 238 languages and 259 territories—740 locales in all.

Details are provided in http://cldr.unicode.org/index/downloads/cldr-25, along with a detailed Migration section.

Talks and Appearances Header link

See also the full list of W3C Talks and Appearances.

Acknowledgments

Editor of introductory text: Liam McGee. Contributors: Participants of the Education and Outreach Working Group (EOWG).