W3C

Talks by W3C Speakers (Last six months)

Many in the W3C community — including staff, chairs, and Member representatives — present W3C work at conferences and other events. Below you will find a list some of the talks. All material is copyright of the author, except where otherwise noted.

January 2014

  • 2014-01-23 (23 JAN)

    The New W3C Data Activity

    by Phil Archer

    Atvērtie dati: iespējas un izaicinājumi
    (Open Data: Opportunities and Challenges)

    Riga, Latvia

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

  • 2014-01-24 (24 JAN)

    W3C ja Linkitetty Data (W3C and Linked Data)

    by Ossi Nykänen

    Avoin yhdistetty tieto Suomessa
    (Linked Open Data Finland )

    Espoo, Finland

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

  • 2014-01-29 (29 JAN)
  • 2014-01-29 (29 JAN)

    • The Future is Here: SVG is your Jetpack!

    by Doug Schepers and Alan Stearns

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    Join us at /dev/local for an evening of CSS, SVG, and other open web technologies. Meet members of the HTML, CSS, and SVG Working Groups, and learn the current state of the art and how these key technologies are evolving. If you have knowledge to share, sign up to give a lighting talk on your area of interest.

    The evening will start with food and refreshments, followed by presentations from our experts:

    • The Future of Style by Alan Stearns (Adobe, CSS Working Group)
    • The Future is Here: SVG is your Jetpack! by Doug Schepers (W3C, SVG Working Group)
  • 2014-01-30 (30 JAN)

    Typographers’ evening

    by Chris Lilley

    Microsoft Typography

    Seattle, USA

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    An evening of typographic discussion with the Seattle type community. Meeting starts 8pm.

    Location: Barrel Thief | Fremont
    3417 Evanston Ave. N. #102
    Seattle, WA 98103

  • 2014-01-31 (31 JAN)
    Abstract:
    XForms is a web language which, as the name suggests, was originally designed for describing forms on the web. It has an number of unusual properties, such as separation of data and presentation, abstract input-output controls that allow for easy adaptation using style-sheets, and a declarative, invariant-based computation engine. After the release of the initial 1.0 version of XForms, it was quickly realised that with a small amount of generalisation, XForms could also be used to describe more general applications than only forms. And so was born version 1.1. This has since been widely adopted in industry (for instance the KNMI is entirely XForms-based, and XForms is an integral part of the Open Document Format ODF), and allowed us to gain experience in its use. One of the interesting pieces of experience is that you can write applications in XForms at about a tenth of the cost of using a language such as Javascript. This talk will present the essential elements of XForms, and then as an example, develop a mapping application that would otherwise require thousands of lines of Javascript. Steven Pemberton has been a researcher at the CWI since the early 80's. He has been active in the web since its beginning, organising two workshops at the first web conference in 1994, and chairing the first style sheets workshop at W3C. He has been involved in developing web technologies based on his research, and is co-author of many well-known technologies, such as HTML, XHTML, CSS, XForms, and RDFa, as well as a number of lesser-known ones.

February 2014

March 2014

April 2014

May 2014

  • 2014-05-08 (8 MAY)

    Barrierefreiheitshelferlein vom W3C (W3C Accessibility Helpers)

    by Eric Eggert

    A-TAG'14
    (Accessibility Day '14)

    Vienna, Austria

    Abstract:

    Wie findet man heraus ob eine Seite barrierefrei nach WCAG2 ist? Wo kann ich als Entwickler sehen wie ich Websites in der Praxis barrierefrei umsetze? Das W3C arbeitet an Antworten zu diesen und vielen weiteren Fragen.

  • 2014-05-12 (12 MAY)

    Easy Checks for Web Accessibility: Get the Gist (No Experience Needed) (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    Have you ever wondered: "Is this web page accessible?" If you can use the Web, you can get a good start at an answer — no expertise required!

    Whereas web accessibility evaluation tools spit out complex results that require knowledge to interpret, the W3C resource "Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility" provides a different approach. It walks you through some basic accessibility evaluation with guidance for understanding what you are checking.

    Most people can complete these checks in about 10 minutes once they understand them. If you're new to web accessibility, it will take some time to learn.

    This session provides a jump start to understanding and using Easy Checks so that you can start to answer: "Is this web page accessible?".

    Key Take-aways:

    • Learn simple steps for getting started evaluating 12 aspects of web accessibility
    • Understand some basic accessibility barriers and solutions
    • Gain confidence in reporting web accessibility problems
  • 2014-05-12 (12 MAY)

    Personas, buy-in sessions, and tips to bring accessibility to life (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    When project teams understand the impact of their work on the lives of real people with disabilities, most are highly motivated by a new understanding of accessibility. You can help get them there.

    In this session you'll get resources and guidance for:

    • Orchestrating stellar buy-in sessions with people with disabilities to raise awareness and motivation.
    • Developing and using personas to keep the realities of accessibility in the forefront during design.

    Successfully bringing accessibility to life can make a project team eager and excited to do their best on accessibility for people with disabilities.

    Key Take-aways:

    • Resources for developing and using personas
    • Tips for orchestrating successful buy-in sessions
    • Unleashing the power of motivated project teams
  • 2014-05-12 (12 MAY)

    Wake up and Share the Coffee: Hot Topics in Web Accessibility

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    Come early to register, feed from the breakfast taco bar, and get ready for a speed-dating style coverage of current issues in web accessibility. Get up to speed on the latest challenges and solutions for web accessibility in 2014. Learn what W3C is working on and how you can help spread the news.
  • 2014-05-14 (14 MAY)
  • 2014-05-14 (14 MAY)
  • 2014-05-15 (15 MAY)
  • 2014-05-21 (21 MAY)

    Decentralized Services for All

    by Eric Eggert

    Decentralize Camp

    Düsseldorf, Germany

    Abstract:
    In this presentation, I’ll show what you need to know to make your services accessible to people with different abilities. It will feature documents and resources from the W3C that will help developers building web applications for everyone in their day-to-day work. Additionally I will show the different possibilities of contributing to the W3C to make the web more decentralized.
  • 2014-05-29 (29 MAY)

June 2014

  • 2014-06-07 (7 JUN)
    Abstract:
    XML is often thought of in terms of documents, or data being transferred between machines, but there is an aspect of XML often overlooked, and that is as a source of live data, that can be displayed in different ways in real time, and used in interactive applications.
  • 2014-06-12 (12 JUN)

    Efficient Government, Happy Developers

    by Phil Archer

    From e-Parliament to smart-Parliament

    Rome, United Kingdom

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

    Abstract:
    This will be a very brief look at how Linked Open Data is helping to improve government efficiency and what needs to be done to expose that data more usefully as services for external developers.
  • 2014-06-28 (28 JUN)
    Abstract:
    Chaals will explore two possible futures for mobile platforms. In one, open technology supports a powerful base for building applications that run on a wide variety of devices. In the other, incompatible ecosystems compete for mind- and market share, offering ever more powerful, comfortable and enclosing environments. Each of these possibilities has benefits as well as drawbacks, for users, developers, and the people who build the systems themselves. From where we are now, both of these are possible. What are the benefits and drawbacks, and who are the winners and losers, for each scenario? What are the key factors that will lead us one way or the other?
  • 2014-06-30 (30 JUN)
    Abstract:
    Benefits of the use of Public Sector Information through the successful case of the Public Transport information released by the City of Gijón. Although, at the beginning, local government was reluctant to open its data, now all the sectors take advance of the reuse of PSI: industry produces Web applications and widgets for citizens; restaurants installed display systems to inform customers; a local artist created a multimedia artwork based on this public information. The most relevant and remarkable action has been implemented by the local government which is reusing their own Open Data, saving potentially €0.8m (4% of the total budget for transport) in the installation of display systems.

July 2014

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