W3C

W3C Presents at WWW2005 in Japan

Web Standards Presentations and "STAR" Sessions Give Attendees In-Depth Knowledge

Contact America, Australia --
Janet Daly, <janet@w3.org>, +1.617.253.5884 or +1.617.253.2613
Contact Europe, Africa and the Middle East --
Marie-Claire Forgue, <mcf@w3.org>, +33.492.38.75.94
Contact Asia --
Yasuyuki Hirakawa <chibao@w3.org>, +81.466.49.1170

(also available in French and Japanese)

http://www.w3.org/ -- 12 April 2005 -- For the first time, The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) will hold three special "State of the Art" (STAR) sessions as part of its track for the Fourteenth International World Wide Web Conference (WWW2005) on May 10-14, 2005, in Chiba, Japan. WWW2005 is hosted by Keio University, and is the latest in the conference series organized by the International World Wide Web Conference Committee. The independent conference is the one event where W3C makes a full public report of its ongoing work.

The STAR sessions give conference attendees an opportunity to see how Web standards are being applied in current practices, in areas as current as Web services, internationalization, and Web accessibility. The sessions are led by W3C technical staff and W3C Members involved in the development and deployment of these standards. The sessions have the goal of providing attendees with the information they need to implement W3C technologies.

In addition to sessions that emphasize current best practices, W3C is also holding sessions that focus on future directions and developments, including panel-led discussions on the mobile Web, "The Future of XML", and the intersection of privacy and the Semantic Web. These sessions are intended as open discussion opportunities, to gather ideas from the Web developer community.

Online registration is available from the WWW2005 Web site, and includes options for single day registration as well as for the entire track. The full conference program is also available, including the refereed paper tracks, the Developer's Day program, and Tutorials and Workshops.

About the World Wide Web Consortium [W3C]

The W3C was created to lead the Web to its full potential by developing common protocols that promote its evolution and ensure its interoperability. It is an international industry consortium jointly run by the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (MIT CSAIL) in the USA, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM) headquartered in France and Keio University in Japan. Services provided by the Consortium include: a repository of information about the World Wide Web for developers and users, and various prototype and sample applications to demonstrate use of new technology. To date, over 350 organizations are Members of the Consortium. For more information see http://www.w3.org/