W3C

Talks by W3C Speakers (2015)

Many in the W3C community — including staff, chairs, and Member representatives — present W3C work at conferences and other events. Below you will find a list some of the talks. All material is copyright of the author, except where otherwise noted.

January 2015

  • 2015-01-10 (10 JAN)

    CSS未来 (CSS future – the state of CSS standardization in 2015)

    by Bert Bos

    CSS开发者大会
    (CSS Developer Conference)

    Beijing, China

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-01-16 (16 JAN)

    Politics, Communities & Data

    by Phil Archer

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

    Abstract:
    Research data, cultural heritage data, government data - you know it's all the same, right?
  • 2015-01-20 (20 JAN)
    Abstract:
    Publishing data in support of academic papers presents challenges to publishers, not least how to establish a sustainable business model. Enrichment, linkage and visualization are the key - and the Web is pretty good at that.
  • 2015-01-20 (20 JAN)
    Abstract:
    The World Wide Web was conceived as a means of social interaction to share knowledge, and developed initially as a "Web of Documents", creating "islands of information". Now the Web is evolving towards a "Web of Data", in which machines can perform connection between the resources available on the web, thanks to the technological infrastructure of the Semantic Web. The basic technology is RDF (Resource Description Framework) which implements a totally decentralized mechanism to describe the relationships between the resources available on the Web. Therefore RDF allows you to publish data on the Web, making them available for remote queries, possibly involving data sources distributed on various sites, thus implementing the paradigm of Linked Open Data at its highest level. But the real glue of the Semantic Web are ontologies, designed as a formal representation of reality and knowledge representation mechanism in a distributed environment. The seminar will outline briefly the basic technologies of the Semantic Web and the principles of Linked Open Data.
  • 2015-01-22 (22 JAN)

    Accessibility for the Win: Orchestrating Organizational Buy-In

    by Shawn Henry

    ConveyUX

    Seattle, WA, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    Imagine an organization where everyone embraces accessibility — where they are committed to making the organization’s website and other ICT accessible to people with disabilities, where they appreciate the additional benefits of accessibility to all users and to the organization, where they approach accessible design as an exciting challenge, where they are proud of their accomplishments in accessibility. In this engaging session you’ll get a vision and practical guidance to help move your organization in that direction.

    You’ll learn how to:

    • Develop a customized business case for your organization.
    • Effectively use the carrots and sticks for motivating accessibility.
    • Orchestrate successful buy-in sessions to raise awareness and enthusiasm.
    • Reach across your organization with tailored top down and bottom up approaches.

    Shawn will challenge the way many people think about accessibility, and encourage a different approach. Be inspired with ideas and equipped with advice to instigate organizational change for accessibility success.

  • 2015-01-22 (22 JAN)

    Easy Checks for Web Accessibility - Get the Gist (No Experience Needed)

    by Shawn Henry

    ConveyUX

    Seattle, WA, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    Get the Gist (No Experience Needed

    Have you ever wondered: “Is this web page accessible?” If you can use the Web, you can get a good start at an answer — no expertise required!

    Whereas web accessibility evaluation tools spit out complex results that require knowledge to interpret, the W3C resource “Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility” provides a different approach. It walks you through some basic accessibility evaluation with guidance for understanding what you are checking. Most people can complete these checks in about 10 minutes once they understand them. If you’re new to web accessibility, it will take some time to learn. From the session, you’ll:

    • Learn simple steps for getting started evaluating 12 aspects of web accessibility.
    • Understand some basic accessibility barriers and solutions.
    • Gain confidence in reporting web accessibility problems.

    This session provides a jump start to understanding and using Easy Checks so that you can start to answer: “Is this web page accessible?”.

  • 2015-01-22 (22 JAN)

    Introduction to WebRTC

    by Dominique Hazaël-Massieux

    WebRTC Info day

    Sophia-Antipolis, France

February 2015

March 2015

April 2015

  • 2015-04-02 (2 APR)

    Web apps: a platform for connected devices

    by Dominique Hazaël-Massieux

    HTML5/Webapps workshop

    Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    Relevant technology areas: Web of Devices and Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-04-14 (14 APR)

    Web Accessibility for People with Cognitive Disabilities

    by Deborah Dahl

    Philly Tech Week -- EvoHaX

    Philadelphia, PA, USA

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    This talk will discuss recent activities at the W3C aimed at improving web accessibility for people with cognitive disabilities such as Down Syndrome, dementia, aphasia and dyslexia.
  • 2015-04-18 (18 APR)

    20 years of CSS:
 maturity or senility?

    by Daniel Glazman

    Bulgaria Web Summit 2015

    Sofia, Bulgaria, Bulgaria

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-04-21 (21 APR)

    Natural Language Interaction with the Web of Things

    by Deborah Dahl

    Mobile Voice Conference 2015

    San Jose, California, USA

    Relevant technology areas: Web of Devices and Web of Services.

    Abstract:
    Connected things are becoming more and more ubiquitous -- in the home, industrial settings, public places and many more. The current model for user interaction with all these things is to use conventional apps or web pages, but this approach doesn't scale. As the number of connected things increases, interacting with them through individual UI's becomes impractical. Similarly, if every type of connected thing has its own API this greatly increases the complexity of application development.This talk will discuss how the W3C Multimodal standards EMMA and the Multimodal Architecture address these scalability issues in the Web of Things.
  • 2015-04-22 (22 APR)

    Cryptography in the Browser

    by Charles Engelke

    O'Reilly Fluent Conference

    San Francisco, CA, USA

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    Cryptography for JavaScript in web browsers has gone mainstream thanks to the new Web Cryptography API. Why was the API needed and how can you use it? This talk will cover use cases, background technology needed, and how to go beyond the basics provided by the API. There will be code: examples for key generation, public key encryption and decryption, and digital signatures and verification.

May 2015

  • 2015-05-11 (11 MAY)

    The WAI to Web Accessibility: An Interactive Tour through Resources from the W3C Web Accessibility (tutorial)

    by Kevin White

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    W3C WAI is best know for WCAG, the international web standard Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. Yet WAI provides a wealth of web accessibility information for project managers, content authors, developers, designers, testers, policy makers, trainers, people with disabilities, accessibility advocates, and others. However, some people are overwhelmed from starting with the standards. But there's an easier way!

    In this class we'll help you find the gold within the WAI website. WAI provides resources to help you create an environment where accessibility flourishes -- whether you need to better understand how people use the web, prepare a business case to secure management support, train developers new to accessibility, integrate accessibility into a project plan, write an accessibility policy, meet international standards, or learn best practices for mobile accessibility.

    Whatever your web accessibility questions, and we'll show you where to go for answers.

    You'll also get a sneak peak at new resources in development and learn how you can help advance web accessibility and share your insights with others.

  • 2015-05-11 (11 MAY)

    Web Accessibility Essentials using WAI-ARIA and HTML5 (tutorial)

    by Eric Eggert

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-05-11 (11 MAY)

    Catching Up with Accessibility: Beginners' Basics (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    If you're just getting started in web accessibility or if you want to make sure you have the basics covered, this class is for you. It provides you with a solid foundation for understanding how people with disabilities use the web, experiencing common web accessibility barriers, and learning the easy things and the most important things you can do now to get up to speed on accessibility. We'll focus mostly on the user experience aspects of web accessibility, and mention a little about the underlying code. (You don't need to know HTML or coding to get a lot from this class.)

    For those who want to learn about checking/evaluating web accessibility, this class provides a good base for the afternoon class Easy Checks for Web Accessibility.

    Key Take-aways

    • Compelling examples to share with your colleagues
    • Insight into how people with disabilities use the web
    • Understanding of common web accessibility barriers
    • A list of easy fixes to make web pages more accessible
    • Resources for getting more information relevant to your situation
  • 2015-05-11 (11 MAY)

    Easy Checks for Web Accessibility: Get the Gist (No Experience Necessary) (tutorial)

    by Shawn Henry

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:

    Have you ever wondered: "Is this web page accessible? " If you can use the Web, you can get a good start at an answer — no expertise required! Whereas web accessibility evaluation tools spit out complex results that require knowledge to interpret, the W3C resource "Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility" provides a different approach. It walks you through some basic accessibility evaluation with guidance for understanding what you are checking. Most people can complete these checks in about 10 minutes once they understand them. If you're new to web accessibility, it will take some time to learn.

    This session provides a jump start to understanding and using Easy Checks so that you can start to answer: "Is this web page accessible?”

    Key Take-aways:

    • Learn simple steps for getting started evaluating 12 aspects of web accessibility.
    • Understand some basic accessibility barriers and solutions.
    • Gain confidence in reporting web accessibility problems.
  • 2015-05-12 (12 MAY)

    A Case Study for Responsive Web Design: Web Accessibility Tutorials (tutorial)

    by Eric Eggert

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-05-12 (12 MAY)

    Web Accessibility Essentials Using WAI-ARIA and HTML5 (Webcast)

    by Eric Eggert

    Abstract:
    Using state-of-the-art web technologies can improve the accessibility of a website tremendously. This session will cover practical examples of accessible images, tables and forms and how using WAI-ARIA, HTML5, CSS and JavaScript improves their accessibility in certain cases. In addition the talk will give a general overview of the resources that W3C has specifically for developers.
  • 2015-05-12 (12 MAY)

    WCAG Conformance Evaluation Process (tutorial)

    by Shadi Abou-Zahra

    AccessU

    Austin, TX, USA

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

  • 2015-05-20 (20 MAY)
    Abstract:
    The W3C Second Screen Presentation Working Group defines the Presentation API that allows a Web page to request display of Web content on a second screen. This talk presents the context that gave birth to this effort.
  • 2015-05-27 (27 MAY)

    Spatial Data on the Web

    by Phil Archer

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

    Abstract:
    A report and update on the OGC/W3C joint working group
  • 2015-05-28 (28 MAY)

June 2015

  • 2015-06-07 (7 JUN)
    Abstract:
    The internet of things is predicated on tiny, cheap, lower power computers being embedded in devices everywhere. However such tiny devices by definition have very little memory and computing power available to support user interfaces or extended servers, and so the user interface needs to be distributed over the network. This paper describes techniques using standard technologies based on XML for creating remote user-interfaces for the Internet of Things.
  • 2015-06-12 (12 JUN)

    GIS and the Web – what's the problem?

    by Phil Archer

    AGILE 2015

    Lisbon, Portugal

    Relevant technology area: Semantic Web.

    Abstract:

    The standards that underpin geospatial data all use Web technologies, notably XML which first became a W3C standard on 10 February 1998. So how come integrating geospatial data with other data on the Web is so hard and often requires manual intervention? Web applications often need to access small parts of multiple large datasets, search engines need to match unstructured text on the Web with locations, data publishers have a lot of choice in how they share their data but which of the many available standards is best for a given context? These problems and more arise at least in part from the difference in culture between the geospatial world in which the primary reference is to a point, line or polygon, and the Web where the primary reference is the identifier, the URI, of a document, a concept, a building or a data point - one property of which might be a location.

    A workshop on this topic organised by the EU's SmartOpenData project in March 2014 lead directly to a collaborative effort between the two key standards bodies: the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). W3C's Data Activity Lead, Phil Archer, will reflect on the problems that have been identified and what needs to be done if the two ecosystems are to benefit from each other's data.

  • 2015-06-18 (18 JUN)

    The convergence of EPUB and the Web

    by Ivan Herman, in cooperation with the Germany and Austria Office

    Buchtage Berlin 2015

    Berlin, Germany

    Relevant technology area: Web Design and Applications.

    Abstract:
    The vision for EPUB+WEB, put forward by experts of IDPF and W3C, is that portable documents become fully native citizens of the Open Web Platform. In this vision, the current format- and workflow-level separation between offline/portable (EPUB) and online (Web) document publishing is diminished to zero. These are merely two dynamic manifestations of the same publication: content authored with online use as the primary mode can easily be saved by the user for offline reading in portable document form. Publishers can choose to utilize either or both of these publishing modes, and users can choose either or both of these consumption modes. Essential features flow seamlessly between online and offline modes; examples include cross-references, user annotations, access to online databases, as well as licensing and rights management. This presentation gives a higher level overview of this overall vision.

July 2015

September 2015

  • 2015-09-02 (2 SEP)
  • 2015-09-09 (9 SEP)

    Special Event: Standardization Brown-Bag (panel)

    by Deborah Dahl

    Interspeech 2015

    Dresden, Germany

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web of Devices.

    Abstract:
    This special event is dedicated to standards in speech and multimodal technology. Three distinguished panelists representing different standardization bodies will be discussing a variety of topics concerning standardization activities with the audience. Topics include: •Goals of standardization •(Dis)Advantages of standardization •How do different standardization bodies address these goals? What are their pros and cons? •What use cases are especially interesting to the Interspeech community? •What existing standards should the Interspeech community know about? •What new standards are needed to support use cases of interest to the Interspeech community? What aspects are missing in standardization, how should they be handled? •How can one get engaged in standardization activities? •What different levels of standards are there (note, working draft, recommendation, etc.)? •What is a typical timeline to develop a standard? •Types of standards publishers (informal standards based on industry/research consortia vs. formal standards bodies; “open specifications” published by a single vendor) •Best practices vs. standards

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