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BDE-Europe in a changing world - inclusive, innovative and reflective societies Community Group

This group closed in April 2016; work has moved to the Big Data Europe Community Group.

This is one of 7 Community Groups established under the BigDataEurope Project, a Coordination and Support Action under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Programme, each one tailored to a specific Societal Challenge. The discussions in this group will be used to design and realise the ICT infrastructure needed to benefit from big data technologies, maximising the opportunities of the latest European RTD developments, including multilingual data harvesting, data analytics, and data visualisation.

This Community Group is specifically interested in the challenge related to Europe in a changing world - inclusive, innovative and reflective societies and is lead by CESSDA.

This group will not publish specifications.

Note: Community Groups are proposed and run by the community. Although W3C hosts these conversations, the groups do not necessarily represent the views of the W3C Membership or staff.

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The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world – Workshop report released

As you know, the first Societal Challenge 6 workshop of Big Data Europe took place at Eurostat in Luxembourg on 18 November 2015 and attracted 42 participants.

It hosted speakers with a policy and data management/providing background (European Commission, Eurostat) and a technical background from within the BDE project (Fraunhofer IAIS, SWC).

A summary was posted a few days ago and we now have the pleasure of sharing with you our comprehensive workshop report: BigDataEurope_WorkshopReport_SC6-1_SocialSciences-Humanities.

You can also take a look at slides and photos from the workshop.

Happy reading!

Please keep in touch:

 

A brief summary of the first Big Data Europe SC6 Workshop: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world

The workshop took place at Eurostat in Luxembourg on 18 November 2015 and attracted 42 participants. It hosted speakers with a policy and data management/providing background (European Commission, Eurostat) and a technical background from within the BDE project (Fraunhofer IAIS, SWC).

The aim of the workshop was twofold, on the one hand the to deliver some results from the project and start a discussion on big data in the social sciences, and on the other to gather input from the stakeholders present at the workshop in order to influence the design of the new big data platform delivered by the BigDataEurope project, and as they will ultimately benefit from the platform.

Through four parallel sessions, the workshop explored the data already in place in the social sciences, the risks challenges of data management of big data, as well as the potentials, touching next on the legal and policy issues associated with big data, and the technological demands.

The workshop revealed that data is now much more than what it used to be when it was just collected from surveys, with two main sources identified, digital footprinting (mobile phones, online shopping, financial transactions, etc.) and sensors. Furthermore, official statistics used to have a monopoly on data but this is no longer the case, as there is an increasing ‘datafication’ of all human activities.

The workshop also informed that there are three main elements of big data for statisticians: data deluge, data analytics and a data-driven economy, populated by industry. What’s more, the third “v” of big data, variety, was deemed the most important topic for the social sciences, though the importance of the real value of the data was also brought up (what to do with the data). Participants learnt that the social sciences are a bit behind in terms of investments in the area of big data.

A full report will follow, watch this space!

Please keep in touch:

Big data in the social sciences: where are we now?

In advance of our “Big Data Europe Workshop: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world” taking place on 18 November 2015 in Luxembourg, CESSDA and Semantic Web Company (SwC) organised a hang-out on 13 October to discuss this topic more informally. The hangout began with an introduction to BDE by Ivana Versic (CESSDA), followed by a presentation on the challenges, dimensions and opportunities of big data by Martin Kaltenböck ( SwC) and by more information on requirement elicitation from Timea Turdean (SwC).

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Ivana explained that the BDE project would produce an integrated stack of tools to manipulate, publish and use large-scale data resources. Shen explained that the focus of the project was twofold, firstly to engage with a diverse range of stakeholder groups representing our sixth Horizon 2020 challenge (SC6), “Europe in a changing world – Inclusive, innovative and reflective societies”, and secondly to design, realise and evaluate a big data aggregator platform infrastructure.

Martin started by reminding participants that every day, we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data, so much that 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone, quoting a study by IBM. The amount of data being produced is growing exponentially, whether it comes from mobile phones, weather sensors or social networks. Statistics are also developing and more and more data is being produced by researchers and academia. This is a challenge and an opportunity which requires taking care of data efficiency and data management approaches, mechanisms and technologies. Martin went on to present the five dimensions of big data to his mind, the five V’s: volume (amount of data), velocity (working with real time data), variety (of sources, formats, data types), veracity (e.g. of statistics where using you have to use several sources to have truth in the data), value (finding an added value of data and data management). He also explained that there was a lack of data scientists and education in data management in Europe.

Timea presented the requirement elicitations found so far for societal challenge six which stemmed from three sources, the online survey carried out at the beginning of the project, interviews and the use case pilots (being carried out in the framework of BDE). She went through the results concerning the first four V’s of big data: volume: that there is not a lot of data in place but that it will become increasingly important in the future, velocity: useful to have (e.g. Google flu real time analysis of the situation), variety is very important (economic and social science data), veracity (ensuring the data quality is high). Comparatively speaking (across all six societal challenges), volume is not highly important (20%), velocity is even less important, variety is over 20% for societal challenge six, she continued.

Regarding long-term preservation of data, SC6 has the infrastructure in place, and regarding data processing it is done mostly on small samples of data, which is consistent with the finding mentioned above concerning the little importance of volume.

A summary written by Eleanor Smith,
Senior Communications Officer of CESSDA
www.cessda.net

  • You can watch the “SC6 – Hang Out: Successful data management in the Social Sciences and Humanities” on YouTube
  • Come visit us at the European Data Forum 2015 (EDF2015), from 16 to 17 November in Luxembourg:

Read about our “Big Data Europe Workshop: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world” taking place on 18 November 2015 in Luxembourg,on 18 November here (fully booked, waiting list).

Trackback from your site.

The Commission launches a public consultation on Standards in the Digital Single Market: setting priorities and ensuring delivery

The Commission recently launched a public consultation on Standards for the Digital Single Market (DSM). With this consultation, the Commission aims to gather views on priorities for standards.

Political context: The rapid integration of digital technologies into daily business practices is fundamentally changing entire sectors and processes. From the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, the advent of 5G technologies, digitisation of industries, big data to eHealth applications, smart and efficient energy and intelligent transport systems, digital technologies are becoming the foundation of a modern economy and societies. Europe is well placed to reap all the benefits of this digital transformation given its strengths in manufacturing and public and private services, and its leading role in important technologies such as fixed and mobile telecommunications, business software and embedded systems. (EC analysis document)

The Commission is gathering views on priorities for standards in key technology areas which are critical to achieving the DSM and which, once delivered, can constitute a technological foundation upon which other standards can be built. The Commission is looking for input on standards in:

  • 5G communications,
  • Cloud computing,
  • Cybersecurity,
  • Data driven services and applications,
  • Digitisation of European Industry,
  • eHealth,
  • Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS),
  • Internet of Things,
  • Smart Cities and efficient energy use.

The contributions to this consultation will serve to build an ICT Priority Standards Plan, as set out in the Digital Single Market Strategy presented by the Commission on 6 May.

E.g. Q2.1 – Please identify and rank the domains (up to 5) and subsequently subdomains (up to 3 per domain) within each domain that you consider a priority. If specific domains or subdomains are missing please add them. (Domain 4: Data driven services and applications)

Read more and respond to the consultation here: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/news/public-consultation-priority-ict-standards-plan

The consultation is open until 16 December.

Online Hang-Out: risks and challenges of successful data management in the Social Sciences and Humanities

October 13 @ 14:00 – 15:00

| Free

In advance of our “Big Data Europe Workshop: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world” taking place on 18 November 2015 in Luxembourg, we are organising a hang-out to discuss this topic more informally.

You are invited to find out more about Big Data Europe and to contribute your ideas on Tuesday 13 October 2015 from 14:00 to 15:00 CET.

Agenda:

  • A few words on Big Data Europe
  • Open discussion on the risks and challenges of successful data management in the Social Sciences and Humanities (legal, data, technical, etc.)

For more information and to register to the hang-out for free:

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Please confirm your intention to join by 30 September.
Join the discussion at our W3C group or subscribe to our newsletter to find out more on how you can get involved.

We look forward to your participation!

The Big Data Europe Social Sciences Team

Big Data Europe Workshop: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world

The growing digitization and networking process within our society has a large influence on all aspects of everyday life. Large amounts of data are being produced permanently, and when these are analyzed and interlinked they have the potential to create new knowledge and intelligent solutions for economy and society.

The European Commission’s Horizon 2020 societal challenge “Europe in a changing world – Inclusive, innovative and reflective societies” seeks to address a number of crucial challenges for the future which include inequality, social exclusion, poverty, unemployment and the economic and financial crisis. At the same time, it recognises that there is great potential for Europe through new forms of innovation and by the engagement of citizens.

We would therefore like to invite you to the following (free of charge) workshop:

WHAT: The challenges of big data for societies in a changing world
WHEN: 18 November 2015, 9:00 – 15:00
WHERE: eurostat, BECH building, Luxembourg

Register for free now.

European Data Economy Workshop – Focus Data Value Chain & Big Data

Description of the workshop

This (free of charge) workshop is organised on the 15th of September 2015 back2back to the SEMANTiCS2015 conference, taking place 16-17 of September at the University of Economics Vienna, Austria in the 11th edition this year.

It provides insights in some of the most important activities around the European Data Economy – with a strong focus on Big Data and the Data Value Chain.The goal of the workshop is first, to overview the state of the art in Europe regarding Big Data & Data Management initiatives and its impact in the Europan economy and benefits for the  European society. Representatives from the Big Data Value Association (initiative behind the so called Big Data Value PPP, see: http://bigdatavalue.eu/), the annual European Data Forum (see:http://data-forum.eu), Big Data related projects: the BYTE Project (see: http://byte-project.eu/), BigDataEurope (see: http://big-data-europe.eu) and RETHINKbig (see: http://www.rethinkbig-project.eu/) and a representative of the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology presenting data-related activities will participate during the first session of the workshop. Furthermore it gives information about the Austrian Big Data Study carried out in 2014 by AIT and IDC.

Second, this workshops aims to identify the necessary requirements in terms of research activities, technologies, skills and other societal items to benefit of data value. Hence, after initial presentations on the topics of the Data Value Chain and the Big Data Value Association, the 3 mentioned Big Data projects projects as well as the Austrian Big Data Study and Austrian data activities, the 2nd part of the half day workshop will be an interactive session to identify, evaluate and discuss the requirements for successfull big data & data management together with all participants and to present findings as a concrete result of the workshop.

Target Groups

CIOs and/or CDOs, Data Scientists and project manager from industry and public administration and/or research as well as everybody that is working on or planning a concrete data management project (possibly with a big data focus).

ALL Infos and details and the registration is available on the SEMANTiCS2015 page

Call for Participation in BDE-Europe in a changing world – inclusive, innovative and reflective societies Community Group

The BDE-Europe in a changing world – inclusive, innovative and reflective societies Community Group has been launched:


This is one of 7 Community Groups established under the BigDataEurope Project, a Coordination and Support Action under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Programme, each one tailored to a specific Societal Challenge. The discussions in this group will be used to design and realise the ICT infrastructure needed to benefit from big data technologies, maximising the opportunities of the latest European RTD developments, including multilingual data harvesting, data analytics, and data visualisation.

This Community Group is specifically interested in the challenge related to Europe in a changing world – inclusive, innovative and reflective societies and is lead by CESSDA.

This group will not publish specifications.


In order to join the group, you will need a W3C account. Please note, however, that W3C Membership is not required to join a Community Group.

This is a community initiative. This group was originally proposed on 2015-04-22 by Phil Archer. The following people supported its creation: Phil Archer, Martin Kaltenböck, Timea Turdean, Simon Scerri, Vangelis Karkaletsis. W3C’s hosting of this group does not imply endorsement of the activities.

The group must now choose a chair. Read more about how to get started in a new group and good practice for running a group.

We invite you to share news of this new group in social media and other channels.

If you believe that there is an issue with this group that requires the attention of the W3C staff, please email us at site-comments@w3.org

Thank you,
W3C Community Development Team