Planet MathML

The Planet MathML aggregates posts from various blogs that concern MathML. Although it is hosted by W3C, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of W3C.

Latest articles

Re: meetings

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Han (laughinghan@gmail.com) • March 21, 2019 • Permalink

Shoutout to Peter for all the organizational work you've done.

Han


On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 12:36 PM Kaveh Bazargan <
kaveh@rivervalleytechnologies.com> wrote:

> I need to thank you too for all your effort, although I have not been able
> to make any of the meetings. What you all are doing is an important subject.
>
> Regards
> Kaveh
>
> On Thu, 21 Mar 2019 at 19:30, Joanmarie Diggs <jdiggs@igalia.com> wrote:
>
>> Also please remember that with respect to accessibility support, the
>> ARIA Working Group is happy to help in any way we can.
>>
>> A number of members of this CG have already joined ARIA, which is great.
>> And any math-specific needs can be raised at the dedicated
>> first-meeting-of-the-month math-topic slot. (They can, of course, be
>> raised at any time; the dedicated slot is to prevent people from having
>> to go to meetings that might be irrelevant to them.)
>>
>> If there's anything else I or ARIA can do to help the effort, you know
>> where to find me. :)
>>
>> --joanie
>>
>> On 3/21/19 12:32 PM, Daniel Marques wrote:
>> > Hi Peter,
>> >
>> > That's a pity but fair. I would like to thank you for all efforts done
>> > during all this time.
>> >
>> > But remember that despite no meetings, maths are already in the browser
>> > in one way or another.
>> >
>> > Good luck! We are in time to setup a meeting if the occasion arises!
>> >
>> > Regards,
>> >
>> > Dani
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 11:43 AM Peter Krautzberger
>> > <peter@krautzource.com <mailto:peter@krautzource.com>> wrote:
>> >
>> >     Hi everyone,
>> >
>> >     Due to the lack of interest, there will be no meetings until further
>> >     notice.
>> >
>> >     Best,
>> >     Peter.
>> >
>> >
>> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> > MathType 7 is out! Check the new version at wiris.com/mathtype
>> > <http://www.wiris.com/mathtype?utm_source=emailfooter>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Kaveh Bazargan PhD
> Director
> River Valley Technologies <http://rivervalleytechnologies.com/> • Twitter
> <https://twitter.com/kaveh1000> • LinkedIn
> <https://www.linkedin.com/in/bazargankaveh/>
>

Re: meetings

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Kaveh Bazargan (kaveh@rivervalleytechnologies.com) • March 21, 2019 • Permalink

I need to thank you too for all your effort, although I have not been able
to make any of the meetings. What you all are doing is an important subject.

Regards
Kaveh

On Thu, 21 Mar 2019 at 19:30, Joanmarie Diggs <jdiggs@igalia.com> wrote:

> Also please remember that with respect to accessibility support, the
> ARIA Working Group is happy to help in any way we can.
>
> A number of members of this CG have already joined ARIA, which is great.
> And any math-specific needs can be raised at the dedicated
> first-meeting-of-the-month math-topic slot. (They can, of course, be
> raised at any time; the dedicated slot is to prevent people from having
> to go to meetings that might be irrelevant to them.)
>
> If there's anything else I or ARIA can do to help the effort, you know
> where to find me. :)
>
> --joanie
>
> On 3/21/19 12:32 PM, Daniel Marques wrote:
> > Hi Peter,
> >
> > That's a pity but fair. I would like to thank you for all efforts done
> > during all this time.
> >
> > But remember that despite no meetings, maths are already in the browser
> > in one way or another.
> >
> > Good luck! We are in time to setup a meeting if the occasion arises!
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Dani
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 11:43 AM Peter Krautzberger
> > <peter@krautzource.com <mailto:peter@krautzource.com>> wrote:
> >
> >     Hi everyone,
> >
> >     Due to the lack of interest, there will be no meetings until further
> >     notice.
> >
> >     Best,
> >     Peter.
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > MathType 7 is out! Check the new version at wiris.com/mathtype
> > <http://www.wiris.com/mathtype?utm_source=emailfooter>
>
>
>

-- 
Kaveh Bazargan PhD
Director
River Valley Technologies <http://rivervalleytechnologies.com/> • Twitter
<https://twitter.com/kaveh1000> • LinkedIn
<https://www.linkedin.com/in/bazargankaveh/>

Re: meetings

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Joanmarie Diggs (jdiggs@igalia.com) • March 21, 2019 • Permalink

Also please remember that with respect to accessibility support, the
ARIA Working Group is happy to help in any way we can.

A number of members of this CG have already joined ARIA, which is great.
And any math-specific needs can be raised at the dedicated
first-meeting-of-the-month math-topic slot. (They can, of course, be
raised at any time; the dedicated slot is to prevent people from having
to go to meetings that might be irrelevant to them.)

If there's anything else I or ARIA can do to help the effort, you know
where to find me. :)

--joanie

On 3/21/19 12:32 PM, Daniel Marques wrote:
> Hi Peter,
> 
> That's a pity but fair. I would like to thank you for all efforts done
> during all this time.
> 
> But remember that despite no meetings, maths are already in the browser
> in one way or another.
> 
> Good luck! We are in time to setup a meeting if the occasion arises!
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Dani
> 
> 
> 
> On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 11:43 AM Peter Krautzberger
> <peter@krautzource.com <mailto:peter@krautzource.com>> wrote:
> 
>     Hi everyone,
> 
>     Due to the lack of interest, there will be no meetings until further
>     notice.
> 
>     Best,
>     Peter.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> MathType 7 is out! Check the new version at wiris.com/mathtype
> <http://www.wiris.com/mathtype?utm_source=emailfooter>

Re: meetings

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Daniel Marques (dani@wiris.com) • March 21, 2019 • Permalink

Hi Peter,

That's a pity but fair. I would like to thank you for all efforts done
during all this time.

But remember that despite no meetings, maths are already in the browser in
one way or another.

Good luck! We are in time to setup a meeting if the occasion arises!

Regards,

Dani



On Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 11:43 AM Peter Krautzberger <peter@krautzource.com>
wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Due to the lack of interest, there will be no meetings until further
> notice.
>
> Best,
> Peter.
>

-- 

MathType 7 is out! Check the new version at wiris.com/mathtype 
<http://www.wiris.com/mathtype?utm_source=emailfooter>

meetings

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Peter Krautzberger (peter@krautzource.com) • March 20, 2019 • Permalink

Hi everyone,

Due to the lack of interest, there will be no meetings until further notice.

Best,
Peter.

Re: Styling Content in <img> Elements

Source: www-style@w3.org Mail Archives • Tab Atkins Jr. (jackalmage@gmail.com) • March 13, 2019 • Permalink

On Tue, Mar 12, 2019 at 6:19 PM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com> wrote:
> CSS Working Group,
> MathML Refresh Community Group,
>
> In a recent MathML Refresh Community Group teleconference call, we briefly discussed styling content (e.g. SVG) loaded via <img> elements.
>
> If there isn’t already a means of utilizing CSS to style content loaded via <img> elements, I would like to propose a new combinator – perhaps “>>”.
>
> img >> svg { background-color: blue }
>
> What do you think?

I've moved your email to a GitHub issue:
https://github.com/w3c/csswg-drafts/issues/3730

~TJ

Styling Content in <img> Elements

Source: www-style@w3.org Mail Archives • Adam Sobieski (adamsobieski@hotmail.com) • March 13, 2019 • Permalink

CSS Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,

In a recent MathML Refresh Community Group teleconference call, we briefly discussed styling content (e.g. SVG) loaded via <img> elements.

If there isn’t already a means of utilizing CSS to style content loaded via <img> elements, I would like to propose a new combinator – perhaps “>>”.

img >> svg { background-color: blue }

What do you think?


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

Regrets RE: Meeting today

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • George Kerscher (kerscher@montana.com) • March 11, 2019 • Permalink

Regrets flying to CSUN/g
 
From: Peter Krautzberger <peter@krautzource.com> 
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 7:49 AM
To: mathonweb <public-mathonwebpages@w3.org>
Subject: Meeting today
 
Hi everyone,
 
Regrets from me today, I have a conflict.
 
Best,
Peter.

Re: Meeting today

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • David Farmer (farmer@aimath.org) • March 11, 2019 • Permalink


Me too.

On Mon, 11 Mar 2019, Peter Krautzberger wrote:

> Hi everyone,
> Regrets from me today, I have a conflict.
> 
> Best,
> Peter.
> 
>

Meeting today

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Peter Krautzberger (peter@krautzource.com) • March 11, 2019 • Permalink

Hi everyone,

Regrets from me today, I have a conflict.

Best,
Peter.

W3C TPAC 2019 - Will your Community Group meet in Fukuoka?

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Alexandra Lacourba (alex@w3.org) • March 07, 2019 • Permalink

[This e-mail is bcc'ed to all public lists of existing W3C Community 
Groups]

Dear participants of the W3C Community Groups,

Once again, the Community Groups have the possibility to meetduring 
TPAC2019 which willbe held in Fukuoka, Japan at the "Hilton Fukuoka Sea 
Hawk"[1].

TPAC 2019
16 - 20 September 2019
Fukuoka, Japan
https://www.w3.org/2019/09/TPAC-template/Overview.html We ask you to 
start discussions to determine whether and when yourgroup(s) would like 
to meetduring this week. Please complete the following questionnaire by 
12 April 2019:

https://www.w3.org/2002/09/wbs/1/CGsTPAC2019/ W3C Community Groups can 
hold 2-hour meetings on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday. The Available 
slots willbe: 8:30 - 10:30 10:30 - 12:30 13:30 - 15:30 15:30 - 17:30 We 
willbe able to accommodate 4 meetings per day, so 16 over the entire 
TPACweek. Outside of their Community Groupmeetings, non W3C-Member CG 
participants may attend as observers the Working and Interest groups 
meetings who accept observers, as well as the Technical Plenary Day 
willbe held on 18 September from 08:30-18:00. There will be registration 
fees to offset a portion of the meeting costs. If you have any 
questions, please contact <w3t-tpregister@w3.org 
<mailto:w3t-tpregister@w3.org>>. We look forward to another successful 
meeting!

For the W3C TPAC 2019 Event team
Alexandra Lacourba
W3C Global Event Coordinator

[1] 
https://www3.hilton.com/en/hotels/japan/hilton-fukuoka-sea-hawk-FUKHIHI/index.httm

RE: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Adam Sobieski (adamsobieski@hotmail.com) • February 28, 2019 • Permalink

Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,

I put together some discussion notes on these MathML4 and related Web technology topics. Attached is a PDF version. I hope this brainstorming is useful to the MathML4 endeavor and, in the event of interest, I could open a Google Documents document of this content.


Presentation and Semantics

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />

<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

</math>

Presentation, Semantics and Metadata

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-xhtml" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-svg" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation id="eq1-p-png" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-mathmlp" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s-om" encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s-mathmlc" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

<metadata>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>

</metadata>

</math>

Multiple Notations

Expression “metadata” could be utilized to describe and interrelate multiple “presentation” annotations, e.g. to describe “presentation” annotations as utilizing distinct notations. With ontology for describing “presentation” annotations’ notations in “metadata”, one or more JavaScript libraries could be authored to facilitate navigating notation, e.g. selecting which notations are displayed for expressions in documents.

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-n1" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-n2" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-n3" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

<metadata>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>

</metadata>

</math>



Should, instead, notation be an attribute on “presentation” annotations?

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml notation="Notation 1" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml notation="Notation 2" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml notation="Notation 3" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

</math>

Multiple Presentation Formats and Multiple Notations

This example shows a combination of multiple presentation formats with multiple notations.

<math id="eq1">
<presentation>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 1" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 2" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 3" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 1" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 2" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 3" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation notation="Notation 1" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
<annotation notation="Notation 2" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
<annotation notation="Notation 3" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 1" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 2" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml notation="Notation 3" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
<annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
</math>

Internationalization

For scenarios where natural language is utilized in the “presentation” annotation content, a BCP47 language attribute can adorn annotation markup and “presentation” annotations can also be described in expression “metadata”.

<math id="eq1">
<presentation>
<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-l1" lang="en" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-l2" lang="fr" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
<annotation-xml id="eq1-s" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
<annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
</metadata>
</math>

Multimodality

“Presentation” annotations can include multimodal content, e.g. SSML or audio, and “presentation” annotations can also be described in expression “metadata”.

<math id="eq1">
<presentation>
<annotation-xml lang="en" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml lang="fr" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml lang="en" encoding="application/ssml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml lang="fr" encoding="application/ssml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml lang="en" encoding="audio/mpeg" src="...">...</annotation-xml>
<annotation-xml lang="fr" encoding="audio/mpeg" src="...">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
</math>

Quality Scores

With quality score attributes, algorithms for selecting content from alternatives can resemble agent-driven or reactive content negotiation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_negotiation).

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml q="0.9" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml q="0.9" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation q="0.9" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />

<annotation-xml q="1.0" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

</math>

Remote Content

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml" src="eq1.xhtml" />

<annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml" src="eq1.svg" />

<annotation encoding="image/png" src="eq1.png" />

<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation" src="eq1.mmlp" />

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml" src="eq1.om" />

<annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content" src="eq1.mmlc" />

</semantics>

</math>

Content Negotiation

Using agent-driven or reactive content negotiation over HTTP, URL’s can be provided for “presentation”, “semantics” and “metadata” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_negotiation).

<math id="eq1">

<presentation src="eq1.php?content=presentation" />

<semantics src="eq1.php?content=semantics" />

<metadata src="eq1.php?content=metadata" />

</math>

Toward a Single URL per Mathematical Expression

<math id="eq1" src="eq1.php" />

Extensibility

Are there any other varieties of content for a mathematical expression beyond “presentation”, “semantics” and “metadata”? Might we want to include “other” for extensibility?

<math id="eq1">

<presentation>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-xhtml" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-svg" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation id="eq1-p-png" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />

<annotation-xml id="eq1-p-mathmlp" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>

</presentation>

<semantics>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s-om" encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation-xml id="eq1-s-mathmlc" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>

</semantics>

<metadata>

<annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>

<annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>

</metadata>

<other rel="http://www.<http://www.semantic.com/example-uri/>example.com/semantic-uri/<http://www.semantic.com/example-uri/>">

<annotation-xml id="eq1-o" encoding="...">...</annotation-xml>

</other>

</math>

Interrelating Expressions and Mathematical Proofs

Is content which interrelates mathematical expressions, e.g. for mathematical proofs, expression “metadata” or is it another variety of content?

Clipboarding

Some preliminary thoughts on clipboarding mathematical expressions include a consideration of multipart MIME. A mathematics expression can map to data of type multipart/related which contains multiple, nested contents of type multipart/alternative (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIME#Multipart_messages). The root part or the main part of the multipart/related message, the part which references content in the other parts, can be the “metadata” content.

Content Negotiation and Semantic Web Formats

In the section Multiple Notations, it was asked whether mathematical notation should be an attribute on “presentation” annotations.

We could also add “notation” to a list of parameters for local and remote content negotiation: encoding, language, quality and notation. Perhaps, the parameters of content negotiation could be extensible. Adding a parameter for “notation” could be as simple as utilizing a URI in content returned during agent-driven or reactive content negotiation.

“Unfortunately HTTP leaves the format of the list of representations and metadata along with selection mechanisms unspecified.” – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_negotiation

If the format of the content returned accompanying an HTTP 300 or 406 during agent-driven or reactive content negotiation were a Semantic Web format, e.g. RDF/XML, then these matters would be tractable. We could readily add “notation” as a content negotiation parameter.

We could specify the use of Semantic Web formats, e.g. RDF/XML (application/rdf+xml), during agent-driven or reactive content negotiation. This would facilitate extensibility in terms of the parameters of content negotiation (adding “notation” to encoding, language and quality).



Best regards,
Adam Sobieski





Using Math Alphanumerics in Code and Web Pages

Source: Murray Sargent: Math in Office • MurrayS3 • February 27, 2019 • Permalink

The post UTF-8 RTF shows how much easier it is to read the rich text format (RTF) with Unicode characters instead of the RTF \uN notation. You see the real characters instead of signed 16-bit decimal numbers and two such numbers for characters above the BMP. In fact, UTF-8 RTF is remarkably readable. The same readability improvement occurs in computer programs and web source. This post illustrates how much easier it is to read C++ programs and MathML using UTF-8.

Contemporary compilers, editors and browsers support UTF-8 and there’s no need to use ASCII numeric character codes like \x222B. The use of such ASCII is so last century. If you want ∫, use ∫ instead of \x222B. UTF-8 is the default encoding for HTML and XML and is the most widely used encoding on the web. This includes excellent plane-1 support thanks in part because most emoji are there. Hence the support for plane-1 math alphanumerics is excellent everywhere as illustrated by the math alphanumerics in this post.

C++

Microsoft Office apps run on the Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android platforms. The compilers and editing environments for these platforms all support UTF-8 source files. For example, my math unit tests include string literals like L"𝑥=(−𝑏±√(𝑏^2−4𝑎𝑐))/2𝑎", which is the UnicodeMath for the solution to the quadratic equation. Using last-century notation (ASCII with hexadecimal literals), that string can be written as

L"\xD835\xDC65=(\x2212\xD835\xDC4F\x00B1\x221A(\xD835\xDC4F^2\x2212"
    L"4\xD835\xDC4E\xD835\xDC50))/2\xD835\xDC4E"

That’s hard to read, while L"𝑥=(−𝑏±√(𝑏^2−4𝑎𝑐))/2𝑎" is easy to read and comprehend.

Another example is an entry in the RichEdit Nemeth braille conversion tables

    {L"⠀⠈⠱⠨⠅⠀", 0x2245 },     // ≅ Approximately equal to

Here the braille string in L"⠀⠈⠱⠨⠅⠀" is encoded in the Unicode braille block U+2800..U+28FF and represents the Unicode character ≅, which has the code U+2245. You can use the character literal L’≅’ instead of the 0x2245, but it’s handy to know what the Unicode value is. Typically, with character literals, I include both the hexadecimal character code and the Unicode character itself.

For years I’ve wanted to use legitimate Unicode operators like ≤ and ≠ in C++ programs (see Section 6 of UnicodeMath). While the C++ compilers still don’t recognize Unicode operators other than those in the ASCII subset, you can fake them using fonts like Fira Code that have ligatures for common ASCII operator pairs and sequences. For example, with Fira Code, <= and != display as ≤ and ≠, respectively. The widths of the ligatures are the same as the underlying operator pairs, so that the column alignment is unchanged. Try it, you might like it! One operator Fira Code doesn’t have a ligature for is ->. It should display →. Maybe someday.

 

MathML

In MathML the need for math-italic letters is reduced substantially due to the convention that a single ASCII letter inside <mi>…</mi> is automatically converted to math italic for display. So, <mi>x</mi> represents 𝑥 (U+1D465). Would be nice if the reverse were true! But other math alphanumerics (script, Fraktur, bold, bold-italic, etc.) don’t have such a convention. They can be specified via the mathvariant attribute as in <mi mathvariant='script'> L </mi> for the character ℒ. But for this it’s easier to read <mi> ℒ </mi>, which is also valid MathML. The mathvariant attribute was added to MathML before the Unicode math alphanumerics were encoded in Unicode 3.1.0 (March, 2001). But now it’s only needed for reading existing documents that contain it.

In implementing MathML math variants, the Unicode math alphanumerics should be used. The character-level machinery of editors and browsers handle the math alphanumerics. There’s no need to use a higher-level protocol such as CSS to handle them. The reason the math alphanumerics were encoded in Unicode is to support math characters in plain text since different math styles have different semantics. ℋ is a different variable from 𝐻. If you ignore the difference, you convert the Hamiltonian formula

into an integral equation! Something with an entirely different meaning.

Using CSS in MathML may also limit the resulting content to environments that support CSS. That excludes many math programs and CSS isn’t supported in the Office MathML readers and writers. So, while CSS can be used “under the sheets” to implement MathML display, it shouldn’t be part of MathML content or, at least, ignoring it shouldn’t change the meaning of the content.

Entering UTF-8 characters in programs

In contemporary document editors such as Word, you can enter Unicode characters in a variety of ways, ranging from an Insert Symbol dialog and math-ribbon galleries to the hex hot key Alt+x (type 222B Alt+x and you get ∫). At present, the Visual Studio IDE editor doesn’t offer such input methods, although it should. To make up for this, you can enter them in Word or RichEdit and copy them into your C++ programs and web pages.

RE: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Adam Sobieski (adamsobieski@hotmail.com) • February 27, 2019 • Permalink

Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,

Multiple Notations

Earlier, Stephen Watt indicated an interest in scenarios with multiple notations. In theory, expression “metadata” could be utilized to describe and interrelate multiple “presentation” annotations, including to describe annotations as having distinct notations. With ontology for describing “presentation” annotations’ notations in “metadata”, one or more JavaScript libraries could be authored to facilitate navigating multiple notations for the same “semantics”, e.g. toggling the display of expressions in documents based on notation.

<math id="eq1">
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml id="eq1-notation1" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="eq1-notation2" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="eq1-notation3" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml id="eq1-semantics" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
</metadata>
</math>

Interrelating Expressions and Mathematical Proofs

Might content which interrelates mathematical expressions, e.g. for mathematical proofs, be expressions’ “metadata” or might it be another variety of content? Can mathematical expression “metadata” facilitate Web-based software applications resembling Lurch Math (http://lurchmath.org/about/)?

Extensibility

Are there any other varieties of content for mathematical expressions to consider beyond “presentation”, “semantics” and “metadata”? Might one want to include “other” for extensibility?

<math id="eq2">
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml id="eq2-presentation-xhtml" encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="eq2-presentation-svg" encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation id="eq2-presentation-png" encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml id="eq2-presentation-mathmlp" encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml id="eq2-semantics-openmath" encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="eq2-semantics-mathmlc" encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
</metadata>
<other rel="http://www.example.com/semantic-uri/">
  <annotation-xml encoding="…">...</annotation-xml>
</other>
</math>


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

Review of Igalia's Web Platform activities (H2 2018)

Source: Updates | Frédéric Wang • February 26, 2019 • Permalink

This blog post reviews Igalia’s activity around the Web Platform, focusing on the second semester of 2018.

Projects

MathML

During 2018 we have continued discussions to implement MathML in Chromium with Google and people interested in math layout. The project was finally launched early this year and we have encouraging progress. Stay tuned for more details!

Javascript

As mentioned in the previous report, Igalia has proposed and developed the specification for BigInt, enabling math on arbitrary-sized integers in JavaScript. We’ve continued to land patches for BigInt support in SpiderMonkey and JSC. For the latter, you can watch this video demonstrating the current support. Currently, these two support are under a preference flag but we hope to make it enable by default after we are done polishing the implementations. We also added support for BigInt to several Node.js APIs (e.g. fs.Stat or process.hrtime.bigint).

Regarding “object-oriented” features, we submitted patches private and public instance fields support to JSC and they are pending review. At the same time, we are working on private methods for V8

We contributed other nice features to V8 such as a spec change for template strings and iterator protocol, support for Object.fromEntries, Symbol.prototype.description, miscellaneous optimizations.

At TC39, we maintained or developed many proposals (BigInt, class fields, private methods, decorators, …) and led the ECMAScript Internationalization effort. Additionally, at the WebAssembly Working Group we edited the WebAssembly JS and Web API and early version of WebAssembly/ES Module integration specifications.

Last but not least, we contributed various conformance tests to test262 and Web Platform Tests to ensure interoperability between the various features mentioned above (BigInt, Class fields, Private methods…). In Node.js, we worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core.

We also worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation, and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core. Outside of core, we implemented the initial JavaScript API for llnode, a Node.js/V8 plugin for the LLDB debugger.

Accessibility

Igalia has continued its involvement at the W3C. We have achieved the following:

We are also collaborating with Google to implement ATK support in Chromium. This work will make it possible for users of the Orca screen reader to use Chrome/Chromium as their browser. During H2 we began implementing the foundational accessibility support. During H1 2019 we will continue this work. It is our hope that sufficient progress will be made during H2 2019 for users to begin using Chrome with Orca.

Web Platform Predictability

On Web Platform Predictability, we’ve continued our collaboration with AMP to do bug fixes and implement new features in WebKit. You can read a review of the work done in 2018 on the AMP blog post.

We have worked on a lot of interoperability issues related to editing and selection thanks to financial support from Bloomberg. For example when deleting the last cell of a table some browsers keep an empty table while others delete the whole table. The latter can be problematic, for example if users press backspace continuously to delete a long line, they can accidentally end up deleting the whole table. This was fixed in Chromium and WebKit.

Another issue is that style is lost when transforming some text into list items. When running execCommand() with insertOrderedList/insertUnorderedList on some styled paragraph, the new list item loses the original text’s style. This behavior is not interoperable and we have proposed a fix so that Firefox, Edge, Safari and Chrome behave the same for this operation. We landed a patch for Chromium. After discussion with Apple, it was decided not to implement this change in Safari as it would break some iOS rich text editor apps, mismatching the required platform behavior.

We have also been working on CSS Grid interoperability. We imported Web Platform Tests into WebKit (cf bugs 191515 and 191369 and at the same time completing the missing features and bug fixes so that browsers using WebKit are interoperable, passing 100% of the Grid test suite. For details, see 191358, 189582, 189698, 191881, 191938, 170175, 191473 and 191963. Last but not least, we are exporting more than 100 internal browser tests to the Web Platform test suite.

CSS

Bloomberg is supporting our work to develop new CSS features. One of the new exciting features we’ve been working on is CSS Containment. The goal is to improve the rendering performance of web pages by isolating a subtree from the rest of the document. You can read details on Manuel Rego’s blog post.

Regarding CSS Grid Layout we’ve continued our maintenance duties, bug triage of the Chromium and WebKit bug trackers, and fixed the most severe bugs. One change with impact on end users was related to how percentages row tracks and gaps work in grid containers with indefinite size, the last spec resolution was implemented in both Chromium and WebKit. We are finishing the level 1 of the specification with some missing/incomplete features. First we’ve been working on the new Baseline Alignment algorithm (cf. CSS WG issues 1039, 1365 and 1409). We fixed related issues in Chromium and WebKit. Similarly, we’ve worked on Content Alignment logic (see CSS WG issue 2557) and resolved a bug in Chromium. The new algorithm for baseline alignment caused an important performance regression for certain resizing use cases so we’ve fixed them with some performance optimization and that landed in Chromium.

We have also worked on various topics related to CSS Text 3. We’ve fixed several bugs to increase the pass rate for the Web Platform test suite in Chromium such as bugs 854624, 900727 and 768363. We are also working on a new CSS value ‘break-spaces’ for the ‘white-space’ property. For details, see the CSS WG discussions: issue 2465 and pull request. We implemented this new property in Chromium under a CSSText3BreakSpaces flag. Additionally, we are currently porting this implementation to Chromium’s new layout engine ‘LayoutNG’. We have plans to implement this feature in WebKit during the second semester.

Multimedia

Other activities

Web Engines Hackfest 2018

Last October, we organized the Web Engines Hackfest at our A Coruña office. It was a great event with about 70 attendees from all the web engines, thank you to all the participants! As usual, you can find more information on the event wiki including link to slides and videos of speakers.

TPAC 2018

Again in October, but this time in Lyon (France), 12 people from Igalia attended TPAC and participated in several discussions on the different meetings. Igalia had a booth there showcasing several demos of our last developments running on top of WPE (a WebKit port for embedded devices). Last, Manuel Rego gave a talk on the W3C Developers Meetup about how to contribute to CSS.

This.Javascript: State of Browsers

In December, we also participated with other browser developers to the online This.Javascript: State of Browsers event organized by ThisDot. We talked more specifically about the current work in WebKit.

New Igalians

We are excited to announce that new Igalians are joining us to continue our Web platform effort:

Coding Experience Programs

Last fall, Sven Sauleau joined our coding experience program and started to work on various BigInt/WebAssembly improvements in V8.

Conclusion

We are thrilled with the web platform achievements we made last semester and we look forward to more work on the web platform in 2019!

RE: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Adam Sobieski (adamsobieski@hotmail.com) • February 25, 2019 • Permalink

Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,
Neil Soiffer,

Scenarios where a format could be utilized for two purposes emerges from the Semantic Web category of formats. Lange [1] and Marchiori [2], for example, discuss uses of Semantic Web technologies for mathematical semantics. It is possible that one could desire to use a Semantic Web format for both “semantics” and “metadata”.

<math id="...">
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation id="..." encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>
</metadata>
</math>

A “presentation”, “semantics”, “metadata” distinction can also be of use for specifying clipboarding behavior.


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

[1] Lange, Christoph. "Ontologies and languages for representing mathematical knowledge on the semantic web." Semantic Web 4, no. 2 (2013): 119-158.
[2] Marchiori, Massimo. "The mathematical semantic web." In International Conference on Mathematical Knowledge Management, pp. 216-223. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2003.

From: Neil Soiffer<mailto:soiffer@alum.mit.edu>
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 12:15 PM
To: Adam Sobieski<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Cc: Stephen Watt<mailto:smwatt@gmail.com>; www-math@w3.org<mailto:www-math@w3.org>; public-mathml4@w3.org<mailto:public-mathml4@w3.org>
Subject: Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

I agree with David -- why do you need a "presentation" or "metadata" tag separate from "semanatics"? That would only be needed if you have the case where the same encoding could be used for two of those reasons and it wasn't obvious which to use for which reason. Is there such a real-life case?

    Neil


On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 6:21 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>> wrote:
Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,
Stephen Watt,

Thank you.

I recently had an idea that we could also include metadata with respect to mathematics expressions. Here is a fuller sketch:

Presentation, Semantics and Metadata

<math id="...">
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation id="..." encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>
</metadata>
</math>

Presentation – This variety of data pertains to the presentation or display of a mathematics expression.

Semantics – This variety of data pertains to the semantics or meaning of a mathematics expression.

Metadata – This variety of data describes or is about a mathematics expression. Metadata could describe authorship, provenance or include any other data which may be desirable to accompany a mathematics expression across clipboarding scenarios. Metadata could also describe or be about a mathematics expression’s presentational or semantic annotations; for example, metadata could indicate which annotations were derived or generated from which others and could indicate the generator software component (e.g. MathJax).


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski


From: Stephen Watt <smwatt@gmail.com<mailto:smwatt@gmail.com>>
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 6:49:17 AM
To: Adam Sobieski
Cc: www-math@w3.org<mailto:www-math@w3.org>; public-mathml4@w3.org<mailto:public-mathml4@w3.org>
Subject: Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

This is an interesting idea.   Previously, I had been thinking of multiple presentation alternatives for notational choices (rather than supported protocols).   This would be important, for example, in pulling together modules for a course or a book, where the notational styles of the collections differed.   At the time, XSL seemed to offer a sufficient solution, but there is no reason that mathml with pre-generated notational choices couldn't be served.

Stephen

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 4:46 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>> wrote:
Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,

I would like to present an idea for discussion for MathML4. The idea is based upon the approaches to mathematical semantics from MathML3. The idea is to include in MathML4 a means of providing multiple presentational formats.

<math>
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
</math>

With such mathematical markup, browsers could, in a manner similar to MathJax, provide users with configuration to indicate which formats to display when multiple presentational formats are available.

Topics to consider would include the clipboarding of mathematical elements and of hypertext containing mathematics.

Topics to consider would also include interoperation with MathJax. MathJax could populate the presentational options available in <presentation> elements. Interestingly, the document object model resulting from MathJax processing could resemble the document object model had multiple presentational formats been provided.

I look forward to discussing these and other ideas for MathML4.


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski





Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Neil Soiffer (soiffer@alum.mit.edu) • February 25, 2019 • Permalink

I agree with David -- why do you need a "presentation" or "metadata" tag
separate from "semanatics"? That would only be needed if you have the case
where the same encoding could be used for two of those reasons and it
wasn't obvious which to use for which reason. Is there such a real-life
case?

    Neil


On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 6:21 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
wrote:

> Math Working Group,
>
> MathML Refresh Community Group,
>
> Stephen Watt,
>
>
>
> Thank you.
>
>
>
> I recently had an idea that we could also include metadata with respect to
> mathematics expressions. Here is a fuller sketch:
>
>
>
> *Presentation, Semantics and Metadata*
>
>
>
> <math id="...">
>
> <presentation>
>
>   <annotation-xml id="..."
> encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation-xml id="..."
> encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation id="..." encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
>
>   <annotation-xml id="..."
> encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
>
> </presentation>
>
> <semantics>
>
>   <annotation-xml id="..."
> encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
>
> </semantics>
>
> <metadata>
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>
>
> </metadata>
>
> </math>
>
>
>
> *Presentation* – This variety of data pertains to the presentation or
> display of a mathematics expression.
>
>
>
> *Semantics* – This variety of data pertains to the semantics or meaning
> of a mathematics expression.
>
>
>
> *Metadata* – This variety of data describes or is about a mathematics
> expression. Metadata could describe authorship, provenance or include any
> other data which may be desirable to accompany a mathematics expression
> across clipboarding scenarios. Metadata could also describe or be about a
> mathematics expression’s presentational or semantic annotations; for
> example, metadata could indicate which annotations were derived or
> generated from which others and could indicate the generator software
> component (e.g. MathJax).
>
>
>
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> Adam Sobieski
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Stephen Watt <smwatt@gmail.com>
> *Sent:* Monday, February 25, 2019 6:49:17 AM
> *To:* Adam Sobieski
> *Cc:* www-math@w3.org; public-mathml4@w3.org
> *Subject:* Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics
>
> This is an interesting idea.   Previously, I had been thinking of multiple
> presentation alternatives for notational choices (rather than supported
> protocols).   This would be important, for example, in pulling together
> modules for a course or a book, where the notational styles of the
> collections differed.   At the time, XSL seemed to offer a sufficient
> solution, but there is no reason that mathml with pre-generated notational
> choices couldn't be served.
>
> Stephen
>
> On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 4:46 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Math Working Group,
>>
>> MathML Refresh Community Group,
>>
>>
>>
>> I would like to present an idea for discussion for MathML4. The idea is
>> based upon the approaches to mathematical semantics from MathML3. The idea
>> is to include in MathML4 a means of providing multiple presentational
>> formats.
>>
>>
>>
>> <math>
>>
>> <presentation>
>>
>>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>>
>>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>>
>>   <annotation encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
>>
>>   <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
>>
>> </presentation>
>>
>> <semantics>
>>
>>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>>
>>   <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
>>
>> </semantics>
>>
>> </math>
>>
>>
>>
>> With such mathematical markup, browsers could, in a manner similar to
>> MathJax, provide users with configuration to indicate which formats to
>> display when multiple presentational formats are available.
>>
>>
>>
>> Topics to consider would include the clipboarding of mathematical
>> elements and of hypertext containing mathematics.
>>
>>
>>
>> Topics to consider would also include interoperation with MathJax.
>> MathJax could populate the presentational options available in
>> <presentation> elements. Interestingly, the document object model resulting
>> from MathJax processing could resemble the document object model had
>> multiple presentational formats been provided.
>>
>>
>>
>> I look forward to discussing these and other ideas for MathML4.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Adam Sobieski
>>
>>
>>
>

Re: meeting today

Source: public-mathonwebpages@w3.org Mail Archives • Daniel Marques (dani31415@gmail.com) • February 25, 2019 • Permalink

Hi,

No problem. I'll be there but no sure to be on time.

Any agenda so far?

Dani


On Mon, Feb 25, 2019, 9:34 AM Peter Krautzberger <peter@krautzource.com>
wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Regrets from me. I have a conflict this week.
>
> Best,
> Peter.
>

RE: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Adam Sobieski (adamsobieski@hotmail.com) • February 25, 2019 • Permalink

Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,
Stephen Watt,

Thank you.

I recently had an idea that we could also include metadata with respect to mathematics expressions. Here is a fuller sketch:

Presentation, Semantics and Metadata

<math id="...">
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation id="..." encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml id="..." encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
<metadata>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/rdf+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation encoding="application/json+ld">...</annotation>
</metadata>
</math>

Presentation – This variety of data pertains to the presentation or display of a mathematics expression.

Semantics – This variety of data pertains to the semantics or meaning of a mathematics expression.

Metadata – This variety of data describes or is about a mathematics expression. Metadata could describe authorship, provenance or include any other data which may be desirable to accompany a mathematics expression across clipboarding scenarios. Metadata could also describe or be about a mathematics expression’s presentational or semantic annotations; for example, metadata could indicate which annotations were derived or generated from which others and could indicate the generator software component (e.g. MathJax).


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

________________________________
From: Stephen Watt <smwatt@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 6:49:17 AM
To: Adam Sobieski
Cc: www-math@w3.org; public-mathml4@w3.org
Subject: Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

This is an interesting idea.   Previously, I had been thinking of multiple presentation alternatives for notational choices (rather than supported protocols).   This would be important, for example, in pulling together modules for a course or a book, where the notational styles of the collections differed.   At the time, XSL seemed to offer a sufficient solution, but there is no reason that mathml with pre-generated notational choices couldn't be served.

Stephen

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 4:46 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com<mailto:adamsobieski@hotmail.com>> wrote:
Math Working Group,
MathML Refresh Community Group,

I would like to present an idea for discussion for MathML4. The idea is based upon the approaches to mathematical semantics from MathML3. The idea is to include in MathML4 a means of providing multiple presentational formats.

<math>
<presentation>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
  <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
</presentation>
<semantics>
  <annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
  <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
</semantics>
</math>

With such mathematical markup, browsers could, in a manner similar to MathJax, provide users with configuration to indicate which formats to display when multiple presentational formats are available.

Topics to consider would include the clipboarding of mathematical elements and of hypertext containing mathematics.

Topics to consider would also include interoperation with MathJax. MathJax could populate the presentational options available in <presentation> elements. Interestingly, the document object model resulting from MathJax processing could resemble the document object model had multiple presentational formats been provided.

I look forward to discussing these and other ideas for MathML4.


Best regards,
Adam Sobieski

Re: [MathML4] Multiple Formats for Presentation and Semantics

Source: www-math@w3.org Mail Archives • Stephen Watt (smwatt@gmail.com) • February 25, 2019 • Permalink

This is an interesting idea.   Previously, I had been thinking of multiple
presentation alternatives for notational choices (rather than supported
protocols).   This would be important, for example, in pulling together
modules for a course or a book, where the notational styles of the
collections differed.   At the time, XSL seemed to offer a sufficient
solution, but there is no reason that mathml with pre-generated notational
choices couldn't be served.

Stephen

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 4:46 AM Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
wrote:

> Math Working Group,
>
> MathML Refresh Community Group,
>
>
>
> I would like to present an idea for discussion for MathML4. The idea is
> based upon the approaches to mathematical semantics from MathML3. The idea
> is to include in MathML4 a means of providing multiple presentational
> formats.
>
>
>
> <math>
>
> <presentation>
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/xhtml+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/svg+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation encoding="image/png" src="data:..." />
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Presentation">...</annotation-xml>
>
> </presentation>
>
> <semantics>
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="application/openmath+xml">...</annotation-xml>
>
>   <annotation-xml encoding="MathML-Content">...</annotation-xml>
>
> </semantics>
>
> </math>
>
>
>
> With such mathematical markup, browsers could, in a manner similar to
> MathJax, provide users with configuration to indicate which formats to
> display when multiple presentational formats are available.
>
>
>
> Topics to consider would include the clipboarding of mathematical elements
> and of hypertext containing mathematics.
>
>
>
> Topics to consider would also include interoperation with MathJax. MathJax
> could populate the presentational options available in <presentation>
> elements. Interestingly, the document object model resulting from MathJax
> processing could resemble the document object model had multiple
> presentational formats been provided.
>
>
>
> I look forward to discussing these and other ideas for MathML4.
>
>
>
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> Adam Sobieski
>
>
>

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