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Video-Based Resources/Evaluation Introduction/descriptive transcripts

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Note about description: The video on this page does not include synchronized audio description because the visuals only illustrate the audio and do not provide additional information. In this case, audio description would be more distracting than useful to most people, including people who cannot see the visuals. Description of visual information is integrated in the Text Transcripts with Description of Visuals (“descriptive transcripts”).

Video 1: Evaluation Overview

Text Transcript with Description of Visuals {#transcript}

The videos have basic animation that illustrates what is said by an off-screen voice. People are represented by icon figures.

Audio Visual
Evaluating web accessibility: resources overview Evaluating web accessibility: resources overview.
Evaluation helps you ensure that your websites and applications meet accessibility requirements. A magnifying glass with the word evaluation on a computer screen with a website on it.
Ideally you evaluate regularly throughout the design and development process. This way you find errors early and avoid costly repairs later in the process. The web page components rearrange on the page until following a good design.
The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative, W-A-I, or WAI, provides free resources to help you with your evaluation. W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.
"Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility" explains how you can do some checks yourself. "Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility". A person in front of the computer. A light bulb appears.
Even if you are new to web accessibility and not technical, these checks give you a rough idea of the accessibility of any web page. A document of checks. Each check is highlighted to show fails or passes.
WAI also maintains a "Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools List" that you can filter. Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools List. A list of tools displayed as icons..
"Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools" explains what tools can and cannot do. Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools. The tools icons displayed in a computer.
For more experienced evaluators, WAI provides "WCAG-EM", the "Website Accessibility Conformance Evaluation Methodology". WCAG-EM. Website Accessibility Conformance Evaluation Methodology. A person in front of a computer. A simplified report is displayed. A person in front of a computer, and the screen showing a simplified report.
The "WCAG-EM Report Tool" helps you record the findings as you follow the methodology. WCAG-EM Report Tool. A progress bar shows the various stages of the evaluation methodology.
To help you better understand how different users experience your website and applications, WAI provides guidance in "Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility" and Involving users in Evaluating Web Accessibility. The screen splits into 12 fields each with a different user in front of a computer. Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility and Involving users in Evaluating Web Accessibility
With all these resources, you can learn how to check your website for accessibility and prioritize the issues you need to address first. A magnifying glass with the words check for accessibility is replaced with a list of issues.
Web accessibility: essential for some, useful for all. Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear; and mouth with sound waves.
For resources on evaluating web accessibility, visit w3.o-r-g/W-A-I/evaluation. Evaluation resources, W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.

Video 2: Preliminary Evaluation

Text Transcript with Description of Visuals {#transcript}

The videos have basic animation that illustrates what is said by an off-screen voice. People are represented by icon figures.

Audio Visual
Easy checks for web accessibility. Easy checks for web accessibility.
Even if you are new to web accessibility and not technical, you can check some aspects of accessibility yourself. A person in front of the computer checking a website with passes and fails. The words new and non-technical are displayed. Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear and mouth with sound waves.
"Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility" gives you step-by-step instructions to get a rough idea of the accessibility of any web page. An arrow moves from left to right to point a list of checks.
For example, a web page from your own website, from your competitor, or from suppliers you might want to work with. 3 websites with different formats.
It is not a complete evaluation of accessibility. More assessment by professionals is needed for a definitive and comprehensive evaluation. A computer with a website shows the progress of an evaluation as items are either marked as a fail or pass.
Sometimes doing just a few of these checks can give you an indication of the overall accessibility. Fails and passes stand out.
Some checks are simple. For example, looking at the title of the web page displayed in the browser window. Web page title is highlighted.
You can do most of the checks using any web browser. Some checks are easier using an extension for your browser. A browser extension is downloaded.
Start your accessibility journey right now by doing some Easy Checks. A map with a route and an accessibility flag at the end.
Web accessibility: essential for some, useful for all. Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear; and mouth with sound waves.
For information on easy checks for web accessibility, visit w3.o-r-g/W-A-I/evaluation. Easy checks, W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.

Video 3: Selecting and Using Tools

Text Transcript with Description of Visuals {#transcript}

The videos have basic animation that illustrates what is said by an off-screen voice. People are represented by icon figures.

Audio Visual
Tools for evaluating web accessibility Tools for evaluating web accessibility.
There are software programs and online services to help you identify accessibility barriers. A tool box by a computer opens. A magnifying glass with the word accessibility comes out to inspect a website on the computer.
They can save you lots of time and effort on evaluation, and can help you avoid creating new accessibility barriers. Save time and effort. Avoid accessibility barriers.
However, tools can't do it all. Some accessibility checks just cannot be automated and require manual intervention. A person next to a computer with a website uses a magnifying glass with the word accessibility.
Some tools guide you through the checks that cannot be automated. A list of checks next to the computer.
Some tools check one page at a time, while others can scan entire websites. A web page and a web site are being scanned fails, passes and interrogations marks are shown.
Tools can be integrated into different work environments. For example, into your web browser, content management system (C-M-S), and your development and deployment tools. Web browser, CMS and deployment around a tools icon displayed in a computer.
They support different roles in a project team, such as content authors, code developers, designers, and product owners. The tools icon is surrounded with icons: pen; coding; paintbrush and person with a key.
Note that in some cases tools can provide inaccurate results. A magnifying glass with a triangular exclamation mark sign.Multiple magnifying glasses are displayed.
So avoid relying too much on what tools say over addressing the real-life experience of website users. The screen splits into 12 different people in front of a computer.
"Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools" explains what tools can and cannot do, and what to look for in tools that meet your needs. Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools. A toolbox icon comes in followed by a signpost and a binoculars icon.
The list of web accessibility evaluation tools has filters to help you find the right tool for your particular situation. A list of documents with the word tool scroll down and to a filter icon, only two documents come out.
Equipped with tools and knowledge on how to use them, you are in good shape to find accessibility barriers more efficiently. A person with a tools and light bulb icons. The two icons merge together to form a magnifying glass with the word barriers.
Web accessibility: essential for some, useful for all. Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear; and mouth with sound waves.
For information on tools for evaluating web accessibility, visit w3.o-r-g/W-A-I/evaluation. Evaluation tools, W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.

Video 4: Comprehensive Evaluation

Text Transcript with Description of Visuals {#transcript}

The videos have basic animation that illustrates what is said by an off-screen voice. People are represented by icon figures.

Audio Visual
Web accessibility conformance evaluation. Web accessibility conformance evaluation.
Conformance evaluation determines how well your content meets specific accessibility standards, such as the "W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines", or "WCAG" for short. Conformance evaluation. A progress bar is filled until meets the WCAG.
Often you'll want to do conformance evaluation:
  • as a final check before releasing a product
  • in order to provide information to potential purchasers of your product
  • to regularly monitor the accessibility of your website
  • before procuring a product
Icons for each stage: open box with a check mark; round "i"; magnifying glass on a computer; and shopping trolley.
(continued list)
  • and when getting started with implementing accessibility, to get a list of accessibility issues that you need to address.
All icons are integrated in a skyrocket icon. A document with the list of accessibility issues.
To do effective conformance evaluation, you need expertise in:
  • accessibility standards
  • accessible web design and development
  • assistive technologies
  • and how people with disabilities use the Web.
Icons are shown in turn: conformation evaluation words; award ribbon; paint brush and coding icon; assistive technologies icons; and finally people figures.
You'll probably also want to use evaluation tools to be more efficient. A tool box with a gauge moving up.
"WCAG-EM", the "Website Accessibility Conformance Evaluation Methodology", provides a structure for your evaluation process. WCAG-EM, Website Accessibility Conformance Evaluation Methodology. A magnifying glass with the word accessibility.
It describes a process to:
  • define the scope of your evaluation
  • explore your website assets
  • select a representative sample of web pages from your website
  • evaluate the selected sample
  • and report your evaluation findings.
Text boxes load one after the other: define scope; explore assets; select sample; evaluate sample; and report findings.
WCAG-EM also recommends involving real users with disabilities during evaluation, to help you address the real-life experience of your website users. A person in front of a computer displaying a website. Passes and fails are marked.
The open source WCAG-EM Report Tool helps you follow the methodology, record the outcomes, and download a report of your evaluation. WCAG-EM Report Tool. A progress bar shows the various stages of the evaluation methodology. A record document is displayed in the computer screen and downloaded.
Web accessibility: essential for some, useful for all. Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear; and mouth with sound waves.
For information on web accessibility conformance evaluation, visit w3.o-r-g/W-A-I/evaluation. Conformance Evaluation, W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.

Video 5: Involving Users

Text Transcript with Description of Visuals {#transcript}

The videos have basic animation that illustrates what is said by an off-screen voice. People are represented by icon figures.

Audio Visual
Involving users in web accessibility. Involving users in web accessibility.
Accessibility is about making your websites and applications usable by people with disabilities. That includes your customers, clients, employees, students, and others. Accessibility. A person in front of a computer. Next to the computer the words: customers; clients; employees; and students.
Unfortunately many approach accessibility just as a checklist. This risks missing the real purpose of accessibility - the user experience. A checklist replaces the person. The website on the screen crumbles. 4 people replace the computer and checklist.
Involving people with disabilities throughout your design and development process can be more effective and yield better results:
  • designers and developers learn how people with disabilities use the web, and understand assistive technologies and adaptive strategies they use;
The group of people are surrounded by icons inserted in a development process cycle: pen icon; coding icon; paintbrush icon; and a magnifying glass icon. Smaller versions of these people are integrated in the process cycle.
(continued list)
  • the project team is more motivated when they understand how their work impacts people's lives;
The process icons remain as the people are replaced with a motivation gauge.
(continued list)
  • development is more efficient, and your products work better for more people, with and without disability;
The process icons remain as the gauge is replaced with a graph showing an upward trend in results. The chart is replaced with multiple people figures.
(continued list)
  • your resulting products are more inclusive and reach a bigger audience, have higher customer satisfaction, and demonstrate social responsibility.
The people increase in numbers as the process icons are removed. A 5 star rating appears above the people to get all 5 stars filled. The people transition into a globe with a heart in the middle.
"Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility" provides guidance on project planning, and throughout the design and development process. Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility. The development process cycle with icons appears.
"Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility" provides more specific guidance on the evaluation stage of the process. Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility. The icons in the process cycle are focused in turn with a magnifying glass.
Together these resources help you focus on accessibility for your website users rather than focusing on technical requirements only. Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility and Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility. merge into a person in front of the computer. On the screen, passes and fails are marked.
Web accessibility: essential for some, useful for all Icons around a computer: hand; eye; brain; ear; and mouth with sound waves.
For information on involving users in web accessibility, visit w3.o-r-g/W-A-I/involve-users. Involving Users in Web Accessibility, W3C and Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) logos.