Important note: This Wiki page is edited by participants of the EOWG. It does not necessarily represent consensus and it may have incorrect information or information that is not supported by other Working Group participants, WAI, or W3C. It may also have some very useful information.


Talk:Basics with Notes

From Education & Outreach
Jump to: navigation, search

15 June - Previous WCAG section wording and comments

The WCAG documents explain how to make web content (including web applications) more accessible to people with disabilities. See the WCAG Overview to learn about:

  • How WCAG 2.0 is structured with 4 principles (perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust), 12 guidelines, and 65 success criteria at three levels (A, AA, AAA).
  • WCAG supporting material:
    • Techniques for WCAG 2.0, which gives you specific details on how to develop accessible Web content, such as HTML code examples.
    • Understanding WCAG 2.0, which has additional guidance for people who want to understand the guidelines and success criteria more thoroughly.
    • How to Meet WCAG 2.0: A customizable quick reference to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 requirements (success criteria) and techniques, which is the WCAG 2.0 checklist
  • A short summary of the WCAG 2.0 guidelines in WCAG 2 at a Glance

{@@deleted: Most people will use the supporting materials when developing web content and web tools, instead of the actual technical standards document. To learn about the WCAG supporting technical materials — including "How to Meet WCAG 2.0", "Understanding WCAG 2.0", and "Techniques for WCAG 2.0", see The WCAG 2.0 Documents or the Using WCAG 2.0 presentation.

{@@deleted: WCAG Techniques give specific guidance for developers on how to develop accessible web content. The techniques are "informative", that is, you do not have to use them. The basis for determining conformance to WCAG 2.0 is the success criteria from the WCAG 2.0 standard, not the techniques. To learn more about techniques, see About the Techniques.

{@@{Suzette: I reviewed the document links taking account the intended readership and have proposed some amendments to this section in the Discussion tab, note 2}
{@@For consideration: If I recall correctly, the audience includes developers new to accessibility. Therefore, whilst I understand that there is a push to read the introductory documents first, if we need to gain the attention of developers, I think we should make available a link to WCAG 2.0, success criteria and the techniques. Otherwise, I fear that it is not only puzzling for the new user to find these key documents, but it may also be a trifle annoying. - Vicki}
{@@reply: I revised this section significantly taking into consideration Suzette & Vicki's drafts and comments, as well as our outreach goal to encourage everyone to link to the Overview pages, and not the /TR/ pages, for introductions. (It would be good to updated & improve http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag Suggestions welcome!) - Shawn}
{@@ would still be nice to draw out the key resources with links - Andrew}

14 June Accessibility requirements

I propose an alternative to the Accessibility Requirements paragraph to give a better introduction and eliminate use of eg and etc:

Accessibility requirements consist of different functional elements of website development that will enable users to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web. This is the basis of the 4 accessibility principles used to support design and evaluation:

  • Perceivable information and user interface.
    • Examples include: providing text alternative for images, providing captions or transcripts for video and audio, providing sufficient color contrast between text and background.
  • Operable user interface and navigation.
    • Examples include: enabling navigation using only a keyboard, providing meaningful hyperlinks, allowing enough time for users to complete a task.
  • Understandable information and user interface.
    • Examples include: making content readable, providing predictable functionality, helping users avoid and correct mistakes.
  • Robust content and reliable interpretation.
    • Examples include: maximizing compatibility with current and future tools such as changes to web browsers and assistive technologies.

To learn more about these web accessibility requirements, see Accessibility Principles.[link]

Examples of 3 web accessibility issues (alternative text for images, keyboard input, and transcripts) are shown in: What: Examples of Web Accessibility.[link http://www.w3.org/standards/webdesign/accessibility#examples]{this W3C page has a different look and feel to WAI pages}.


OR


In order for people with disabilities to be able to use the Web, there certain things that websites and web tools need to do. These accessibility requirements can be categorized under 4 basic principles:

In order for people with disabilities to be able to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, there certain things that websites and web tools need to do. This is the basis for categorizing accessibility requirements under 4 basic principles:

  • providing text alternative for images, providing captions or transcripts for video and audio, and providing sufficient color contrast between text and background. Perceivable information and user interface.
  • enabling navigation using only a keyboard, providing meaningful hyperlinks, and allowing enough time for users to complete a task.Operable user interface and navigation.
  • making content readable, providing predictable functionality, and helping users avoid and correct mistakes. Understandable information and user interface.
  • maximizing compatibility with current and future tools (web browsers, assistive technologies, etc.)Robust content and reliable interpretation.


For more detailed examples of web accessibility requirements, and a demonstration of good and bad design see BAD demo [link http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad].

14 June -- 1.4.1 Web Content

Suzette: I have also made some proposed changes here to the choice of documents that this section links to:

Content is the information in a web page or web application, including: natural information such as text, images, and sounds; code or markup that defines structure, presentation, interaction. Content requirements are specified in Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

The WCAG documents explain how to make web content (including web applications) more accessible to people with disabilities. For a brief introduction to the principles and guidelines see WCAG 2 at a Glance [Link http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/glance] {Note: this link also has links to the Overview and customisable quick reference.}

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 [link http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/] are the W3C approved and internationally recognised guidelines. These are organised by the four accessibility principles of perceptibility, operability, understandability and robustness. There are twelve guidelines, for example:

  • Guideline 1.1 Text Alternatives: Provide text alternatives for any non-text content so that it can be changed into other forms people need, such as large print, braille, speech, symbols or simpler language.

The Guidelines provide a number of more detailed Success Criteria which are assigned to one of three levels of priority A, AA and AAA. For authorised translations see [link http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/translations.html].

For practical advice and recommendations you should also refer to the W3C approved supporting documents when developing Web content and Web tools:

  • Understanding WCAG 2.0: A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 [link http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20] provides extensive guidance, including the intent of the guideline or success criterion; how it helps people with different disabilities, browser and assistive technology support notes, examples, and resources, such as tools to check color contrast.
  • Techniques for WCAG 2.0: Techniques and Failures for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 [link http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS] gives specific guidance on how to develop accessible Web content. It provides general and technology-specific examples, including for HTML/XHTML, CSS, scripting, multimedia, and WAI-ARIA. There are also common failures that show what to avoid.

For a full introduction to the Guidelines and supporting documents go to: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview [link http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php]