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Making Presentations Accessible Notes

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Resources

note: 2012/01/18 and 2012/01/19 16:52:56 versions are the same except for the addition of [revision] in the title

For EOWG discussion

Suggestions for For More Information section update (initial draft by Andrew, 2012.02.03)

Details on how to make material that you give to participants accessible is beyond the scope of this document. There are many resources online that provide details, such as:

  1. Authoring Techniques for Accessible Office Documents - covers 8 different presentation packages (Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University; 2011)
  2. Creating Accessible Presentations with Microsoft® PowerPoint (JISC TechDis Service; undated)
  3. The Incredible, Accessible Presentation with Microsoft®P owerPoint (Glenna Shaw; 2005)
  4. Documentation checklist for Microsoft® PowerPoint (IBM; 2009)

Notes:

{Question: Why have four that all cover PowerPoint? Do the latter 3 have good information that is not in the first reference or is not in our doc? - shawn}
{Answer: recommend retaining first 2; dropping 3rd and 4th as per additional notes in response to Shawn's questions - Andrew}

Above references are recommended in the listed order - for a shorter list, they could be dropped from the bottom on the basis of the following notes:

  1. Ref 1 - The Accessible Digital Office Document (ADOD) Project was a joint project with the UNESCO and the Govt of Ontario and covers 4 versions of 'PowerPoint' and also 'OpenOffice Impress', 'Corel Presentations X5', 'Google docs: Presentation' and 'iWork Keynote '09' with 13 techniques.

  2. Ref 2 - in addition to techniques for creating accessible PPT, TechDIS also covers "Delivering Presentations Inclusively" and "Good Practice in Providing Alternative Outputs to Support Accessibility"
    {Question: Do these have important points not in our document? -shawn}
    AA: we could add an additional example/subpoint to "Ensure that all relevant sound is audible through the sound system" about ensuing any audio used in the presentation is carried over the sound system and not spoken over. TechDIS also discuss the value of blank screens (and how to achieve) as well as pointer options - this discussion adds some value. They also expand usefully on some some of the points covered by IDRC in creating accessible PPT
    AA: overall I think this resources adds to the IDRC one with out repeating too much of what we cover already.

  3. Ref 3 - starts with a large section on "Understanding Accessibility" before discussing Accessible PowerPoint
    {Question: Would we rather them get that info from WAI pages, and thus not want to include this link? -shawn}
    AA: I think the material in How PWD use the Web and in Better Web Browsing essentially covers Glenna's material without the US bias she has at the start. The remaining PPT material is covered in the IDRC and the TechDIS resources
    AA: this ref could/should be dropped

  4. Ref 4 - provides general techniques without any detailed instructions
    {Question: So is it not a useful resources in light of the others provided? -shawn}
    AA: This ref could/should be dropped - the only additional value is a separate section on test techniques, however I think this is covered adequately in the first two resources.

As additional support for organisers, I recommend adding the Planning an Accessible Conference resource from Special Interest Group on Accessible Computing (SigACCESS) as it adds information based on experience about venue selection, catering, social activities and budget considerations based on experience with the ASSETS conference. (NB they link back to our document too:)

AA: just for the record and future consideration, the unofficial Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act site has a page on Plan an Accessible Meeting which does cover more venue issues that we cover. (Mar/2012)

End of Basics section (17 Jan)

Please read through the Basics section and then comment on these options for the last sentence:

  1. In any case, it's best to make your event and presentations fully accessible so you are prepared for any situation.
  2. In any case, be prepared for any situation: make your presentations fully accessible.
  3. To be prepared for any situation, make your event and your presentations fully accessible.

I like the third proposal: "To be prepared for any situation, make your event and your presentations fully accessible." It sounds positive and explains why it is essential to make the presentations and event accessible (Sylvie, January 19, 2012).

I also like the third proposal (Vicki, January 19, 2012).

I agree, third proposal fits with what currently goes before it (Jason, January 19, 2012).

I also support the third option (Andrew, 20/Jan/2012)

Prefer third option as less prescriptive (Liam, 20/Jan/2012)

Edit suggestions

Please indicate priority - we want to get a version updated in January and might put off some edits to a later version.

Andrew on 2012/01/19 Draft Revision

  1. Priority high: in section "for more information" update the TechDIS link to http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/AccessibilityEssentials/
  2. Priority medium: also consider the IDRC work under the ADOD project at http://adod.idrc.ocad.ca/ for the section "for more information" - 5 different presentation tools included plus 4 versions of MS PPT

{ed: Remember - we want to link judiciously. I look forward to your analysis of these and other suggestions for the For more info section. <grin> - 13 Jan}

Sylvie on 2012/01/18 Draft Revision

  1. Priority high: In section benefits:
    "such as" does not fit here. When I read such as, I expect to read something like: "better access, or better understanding", so a list of words. I prpose to end the paragraph like:
    "Accessible presentations also have additional benefits that are explained in the situations described below."
    {ed: OK. We want to make it clear that this is not an exclusive list, it's just some examples. I changed it to "Accessible presentations also have additional benefits, such as in these situations:"}
    {Sylvie: this change works for me.}
  2. Priority medium: in section benefits, first benefit:
    Actual text: "Consider a live presentation with visuals that is recorded and made available online as a podcast. If during the presentation you described the visuals (for people who are blind), then those listening to the podcast will also get the visual information."
    What about broadening this example to all people with visual impairment as some people with low vision may need this description as well?
    New proposal: "Consider a live presentation with visuals that is recorded and made available online as a podcast. If during the presentation you described the visuals (for people with visual disabilities) then those listening to the podcast will also get the visual information."
    {ed: "blind" seems more specific and clear than "visual disabilities". I tried broadening it like this: "(for people who are blind or have low vision and cannot see the visuals well)" but that seemed too long for a minor parenthetical note. Maybe just leave it as is?}
    {Sylvie: may be Wayne can tell us if he considers this a important or not. But what about writing:
    "(for people who are blind or who cannot see the visuals well)"}
    {ed: changed to "(for people who are blind or otherwise cannot see them well)"}
  3. In section Benefits, benefit 2, priority high:
    Actual text: "CART is used by people who are deaf and hard of hearing, people whose native language is different and they can understand text better than the spoken language, and others."
    May be some words have been forgotten. This sentence is not clear to me.
    New proposal: "CART is used by people who are deaf and hard of hearing, people whose native language is different and who can understand text better than the spoken language, and others."
    {ed: OK. I tweaked it a bit to broadly include people who can understand text better regardless of their native language: "CART is used by people who are deaf or hard of hearing, people who can understand text better than spoken language — including people whose native language is different, and others."}
    {Sylvie: I am fine with this change.}
  4. Consistency in title (priority at editor's discretion):
    "Arrange for good visibility of the speaker and interpreters."
    Use either plural or singular for speaker and interpreter.
    {ed: done}
  5. Consistency in verbs in titles (priority: editor's discretion)
    Some headings begin with ing verb: "planning", (planning the event, planning your session). Other begin with other verbs like provide (in provide accessible material and media", "use font face".
    Is there a reason for this choice or should this be consistent?
    {ed: I think the h3s are all imperatives - that is, instructions starting with a plain verb. Most of the h2s are gerunds ending in "-ing" because they group the imperatives by timing or topic. The exception is "Provide Accessible Material and Media" which is an imperative. In an earlier draft we had that as "Providing Accessible Material" and EOWG decided it was worth the inconsistency to use the imperative.}
    {Sylvie: I understand the imperative in the H3 but wondered why the inconsistency in the h2 provide. But I give this to editor's discretion, my question was only about the inconsistency and you responded to it.}
  6. Punctuations: priority low (at editor's discretion)
    I wonder if the use of periods at the end of headings is a typographical rule in English. Moreover, some paragraphs, like the introduction, do not end with a fullstop.
    {ed: Often headings do not end in periods. However, in this case, the h3s are imperative statements and thus have a period at the end. fyi, visually they don't look like big headings, more like bold sentences. The sentences and thus paragraphs should end in a fullstop. Let me know which I've missed. Thanks!}
    {Sylvie: ok for me. May be it was a joke from my screen reader on the link "benefits" at the end of the introduction. It did not display the period which is there, so no example of missing periods to specify.}

Denis on 24 May 2011 draft

General comment: I think we should separate this list of sections in three: basic advices, advices intended for speakers and advices intended for organizers. {editor: one issue with that is that less information would show up in the table of contents and the collapsed view. also, as we discussed in EOWG on 13 Jan, some sections are for both organizers & speakers. I tried adding the indication in parenthesis on the h2s to see what we think of that...}

I would reorganize the information as follow (turning every existing h3 into h4):

  • h2 - BASICS
    • h3 - Basics
    • h3 - Benefits
    • h3 - For More Information {editor: I'd be unconfortable with this tangential info cluttering the beginning}
    • h3 - Terminology {editor: I'd be unconfortable with this tangential info cluttering the beginning}
  • h2 - ORGANIZERS
    • h3 - Planning the Event
    • h3 - Provide Accessible Material
    • h3 - Providing Recording Afterwards {editor: this applies somewhat to speakers, too - and should be considered earlier in the process. in EOWG on 13 jan we decided to merge this into the Provide Accessible Material section}
  • h2 - SPEAKERS
    • h3 - Planning Your Session
    • h3 - Preparing Slides and Projected Material
    • h3 - During the Presentation
    • h3 - Be Open to Accessibility Issues {editor: this applies to organizers, too}
    • h3 - Known and Unknown Audiences {editor: this applies to organizers, too}

Modifications proposal

  1. Priority : low
    • (introduction) Change "This page helps you make" to "This page is intended to help you make" {editor: hummm - this adds words and a slightly complicates the sentence. seems it's not worth it?}
  1. Priority : moderate
    • (Basics) Change "Therefore, speakers need to describe pertinent visual content, speak clearly into the microphone, ensure the facility is accessible, and consider the other points below." to "Therefore, speakers need to describe pertinent visual content and speak clearly into the microphone. Organizers also need to ensure the facility is accessible. Speakers and organizers alike need to consider the other points below." {ed: simplified it to: "This page helps organizers and speakers meet accessibility needs by ensuring the facility is accessible, speaking clearly into the microphone, describing pertinent visuals, and more."}
    • (Planning the event - h3 Ask speakers) Add "People who have low vision might ask to be seated in the front row in order to be able to see the screen." {ed: done}
    • (Planning the event - h3 Arrange for ALDs/hearing loops, interpreters…) Change h3 to "Arrange for ALDs/hearing loops, interpreters, translators and/or CART writers, as needed." {ed: added to lower sections. I think it's beyond scope here.}
    • (Planning your session - h3 provide material ahead of time) Change "Make it accessible." to "Make it available for download ahead of time if possible and make sure it is accessible." {ed: I'm uncomfortable suggesting download because some people are very protective of their material and do not want to make it available for download. The audience for this doc includes people who do private training for fee, etc.}
    • (Planning your session - h3 Work with interpreters and CART writers) Change to "Work with interpreters, translators and CART writers." {ed: done here & above. added text: Give them material in advance; explain acronyms, terms, names, etc. that you will use; and be available to answer questions.}
    • (During the presentation - h3 speak clearly) Change "And avoid speaking too fast." to "Avoid speaking too fast, so your audience and sign language interpreters have a better chance of following up on your presentation." {ed: did "And avoid speaking too fast, so participants and sign language interpreters can better understand you and keep up."}
    • (During the presentation - h3 Use simple language) Change "Avoid or explain jargon, acronyms, and idioms." to "Avoid or explain jargon, acronyms, and idioms. If unavoidable, provide translators and sign language interpreters with definition of their meaning before the presentation starts. Explain acronyms on their first occurence." {ed: put part above in: "Work with interpreters, translators, and CART writers. - Give them material in advance; explain acronyms, terms, names, etc. that you will use; and be available to answer questions." Think "Explain acronyms on their first occurence." is covered in "Avoid or explain jargon, acronyms, and idioms."}
    • (During the presentation - h3 ensure that all relevant sound) Change "repeat their questions and comments into your microphone." to "always repeat their questions and comments into your microphone before providing an answer." {ed: did "before replying"}
    • (During the presentation - h3 describe other visual information) Change "such as, Speaker: 'If you make your websites fully accessible, please raise your hand... About half raised their hand.'" to "such as, Speaker: 'If you make your websites fully accessible, please raise your hand.' And then: 'About half raised their hand.'" {ed: done}
    • (Known and unknown audiences) Change "for example, someone could develop accessibility needs before the training, or a new participant could join the training at the last minute." to "for example, a new participant could join the training at the last minute or someone could even develop accessibility needs before the training." {ed: done}
    • (Known and unknown audiences) Change "Sometimes you won't know whether your participants have disabilities, for example, presentation at a large conference where they didn't ask registrants." to "Sometimes you won't know whether your participants have disabilities. For example, when presenting at a large conference where they wouldn't have asked registrants if they had disabilities." {ed: with other edits, changed to "Often speakers won't know if participants have disabilities, for example, a presentation at a large conference where organizers didn't ask registrants." it's a minor point so I'd rather not have it 2 sentences.}
    • (Known and unknown audiences) Change "In any case, it's best to make your presentations fully accessible so you are prepared for any situation." to "In any case, be prepared for any situation: make your presentations fully accessible." {ed: hum - I'd be interested in EOWG's opinion on this one. :}
  1. Priority : high
    • (Additional benefits) Change to "Benefits" - also change anchor pointing here from "waittheresmore" to "benefits" {ed: done}
    • (Additional benefits) Change "Accessible presentations also have additional benefits, including:" to "Accessible presentations present numerous benefits, including, but not limited to:" {ed: that's a bit wordy. how about changing "including" to "such as"? See alsop the sentence before that includes benefits.}
    • (For more information) Change "Information on web accessibility:" to "The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has developed a lot of information on web accessibility:" {ed: why? perhaps "Information on web accessibility from the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)"?}
    • Change the cursor to a hand when mouseovering over the different sections and collapse/expand signs. {ed: submitted to Shadi}

EOWG on 24 May 2011 draft

Minutes from 13 Jan 2012 EOWG telecon discussion, including resolutions


Shawn on 24 May 2011 draft

Perhaps move the information from under "Be Open to Accessibility Issues" to the top under Basics? or integrate somehow with the info under "Known and Unknown Audiences" -- but needs better heading


Andrew on 24 May 2011 draft

I wonder if the document should be organised as sections for organisers and sections for presenters - or even split into two (cross-referenced) documents?

Somewhere we should also suggest that organisers include a link from their website to the speaker suggestions contained here. {Shawn: yes!}

Basics

Suggest changing final sentence to "Therefore, organisers need to ensure the facility is accessible, while speakers need to describe pertinent visual content, speak clearly into the microphone. Many other points are discussed below for the consideration of both organisers and speakers." {Shawn: agrees}

For More Information

Consider adding links to the following recent resources:

And possibly also to this older resource:

{Shawn: We want to link judiciously. I looked at some of these resources and they didn't seem to have much different information relevant to the target audience for this document. Maybe I missed something?}


Vicki on 24 May 2011 draft

These comments refer to the bottom three items in the TOC: "Additional Benefits", "For More Information", "Terminology"

Priority: High

1. "Additional Benefits"

Proposal:

Either

(a) Remove the word "Additional" and leave as "Benefits". In this case, move this item up in the TOC to the position after "Provide Accessible Material"

or

(b) Instead of having it as a separate item, inlcude it in "Provide Accessible Material"


2. "For More Information", "Terminology"

Proposal: This should be the last item. Shift, "Terminology" before "For More Information"


3. "Known and Unknown Audiences"


Priority: Low

I wonder if this point should be placed straight after "Planning the Event".

Vicki: Suggestions on "Basics" edit of January 23, 2012 version:

Priority: High

1. Suggestion: Modify this sentence:

"Therefore, organizers and speakers should do things like ensure the facility is accessible, speak clearly into the microphone, describe pertinent visuals, and other considerations listed on this page."

to:

"Organizers and speakers should ensure that the facility is accessible, think of speaking clearly into the microphone, describe pertinent visuals, and other considerations listed on this page."

Rationale:

"... should do things like..." sounds too colloquial and differs from the style of the rest of this text.

2. Improve the paragraph for web display (use bullets to list the items) and other minor edits in the text:

Priority: Low

Respect participant's needs and be open for other accessibility issues. While most issues are addressed here, people might have specific accessibility needs that are not covered here and which you may not have thought of. For example:

  • Someone might need to take breaks at set times for insulin injections
  • Someone with Tourette syndrome might randomly shout out during a session
  • Someone with a physical disability who cannot take notes might need to record the session.