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WAI Site Usability Testing Questions

Last updated $Date: 2003/10/24 19:42:55 $ by $Author: shawn $
Developed by WAI Site Task Force of EOWG and AIR.

on this page: Pre-test Questions | Participant Tasks | Post-test Interview | Post-test Survey


Pre Test Questions

  1. Do you ever research issues related to Web accessibility for people with disabilities? (If no: skip to 11)
  2. What resources do you use to learn about Web accessibility? (Probe: Web sites, books, classes)
  3. (May not need to ask) What Web sites do you use to learn about Web accessibility?
  4. How often do you use them?
  5. What do you like about each of the Web sites?
  6. What do you dislike about each of the Web sites?
  7. What types of Web accessibility information do you look for on the Internet?
  8. What are the last three Web accessibility topics or questions you researched on the Internet?
  9. What drives your interest in Web accessibility?
  10. How long have you been involved in Web accessibility?
  11. Do any of the authoring tools you use have features to help make your Web sites accessible?
  12. How long have you been involved in Web development or management?
  13. If you were to envision your ideal Web accessibility Web site, what sorts of information would it contain? What would it look and act like? How would it be organized?

Participant Tasks

Task 1

This is the homepage of a Web site dedicated to Web-related accessibility issues. Please give me your initial reactions to this page. Feel free to explore this page as you normally would. You can scroll around with your mouse, but please don't click on anything just yet.

Faciliator will ask:

Task 2

I'm going to give you five minutes to freely explore this Web site. You may go anywhere you would like to go on the Web site, but please remember to speak aloud as you do so. I will tell you when the five minutes are up.

Task 3

Your friend Kevin mentions hearing about something called "the Web Accessibility Initiative" but he isn't sure what it is. Using this Web site, determine whether or not it contains information that would address Kevin's question.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 4

Your team at work is developing a Web site and you have some concerns about how accessible the Web site might be to persons with disabilities. Using this Web site, determine whether or not it contains general hints about what Web developers need to know about Web accessibility.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 5

A few of your colleagues are interested in finding out how to be a part of WAI's effort to develop guidelines for Web accessibility. Using this Web site, determine whether or not opportunities exist for becoming involved in WAI guideline development.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 6

You have just been handed a report, generated by a Web accessibility evaluation tool, which informs you that your company Web site contains graphs that do not meet "Checkpoint 1.1."

Using this Web site, a) determine what Checkpoint 1.1 is, and b) determine an appropriate strategy for representing these complex pictures.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 7

Your company is revising the online forms on its Web site. Find specific information on how to make the online forms accessible.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 8

A company with many global divisions and Web sites in many languages has asked for your opinion on how Web accessibility laws differ around the world. Using this Web site, determine whether or not it contains relevant information.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 9

You have been invited to be a presenter at a local conference on Web accessibility. Find information on this Web site that you would want to use to help you prepare your talk.

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Task 10

The company division you work in is responsible for making sure that your corporate Web site is accessible. How can your team use the WAI Web site to determine the accessibility of your company Web site?

When you feel you have completed this task, please say so.

Post Test Interview

  1. What are your overall impressions of the Web site?
  2. If you had to give the site a grade, from A to F, where A was exemplary and F was failing, what grade would you give it, and why?
  3. Name three words or characteristics that describe this Web site.
  4. What are the three things you like best about the Web site?
  5. What are the three things you like least about the Web site?
  6. If you could make one significant change to this Web site, what change would you make?
  7. Would you return to this Web site on your own in the future? Why/why not?
  8. What would entice you to return?
  9. Are there materials you would like to see added to the Web site? Which ones?
  10. Would you recommend this Web site to a colleague? To a friend?
  11. Do you have any other questions or comments about the Web site or your experiences with it?

Post Test Survey

Post-test Survey

For our last activity I'm going to give you a short questionnaire that I would like you to fill out. The questionnaire will give you a series of statements about the Web Accessibility Initiative Web site. I would like you to rate your agreement with each statement. While you fill out the questionnaire, I will step into the observation booth to see if our observers have any further questions.

  1. The homepage is attractive.
  2. The overall site is attractive.
  3. The site's graphics are pleasing.
  4. The site has a good balance of graphics versus text.
  5. The colors used throughout the site are attractive.
  6. The typography (lettering, headings, titles) is attractive.
  7. The homepage's content makes me want to explore the site further.
  8. It is easy to find my way around the site.
  9. I can get to information quickly.
  10. It is fun to explore the site.
  11. It is easy to remember where to find things.
  12. Information is layered effectively on different screens.
  13. The homepage is attention-getting.
  14. Information is easy to read.
  15. Information is written in a style that suits me.
  16. Screens have the right amount of information.
  17. The site effectively communicates the company's identity.
  18. The information is relevant to my professional needs.
  19. The site is designed with me in mind.
  20. The site's content interests me.
  21. The site's content would keep me coming back.
  22. The site has characteristics that make it especially appealing.
  23. The site reflects progressive, leading edge design.
  24. The site is exciting.
  25. The site is well-suited to first-time visitors.
  26. The site is well-suited to repeat visitors.
  27. The site has a clear purpose.
  28. I always felt I knew what it was possible to do next.
  29. It is clear how screen elements (e.g., pop-ups, scrolling lists, menu options, etc.) work.
  30. My mistakes were easy to correct.

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