The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

Minutes Telecon 2018-11-14

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 15 November 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

New Working Draft: CSS Shadow Parts. New Note: CSS Snapshot …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page15 November 2018

15 Nov 2018 New Working Draft: CSS Shadow Parts. New Note: CSS Snapshot 2018.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 70

Source: Surfin' Safari 14 November 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 70 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 237630-237919.

Web Animations

Intersection Observer

CSS

WebRTC

Rendering

Web Inspector

Storage

Media

Payment Request

Security UI

#221 - 23 Jun 2014

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Mid Century Modern' by Andrew Lohman

#220 - 12 Dec 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Garments' by Dan Mall

#219 - 5 Dec 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Steel' by Steffen Knoeller

#218 - 26 Nov 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Apothecary' by Trent Walton

#217 - 19 Nov 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Screen Filler' by Elliot Jay Stocks

#216 - 17 Sept 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'Fountain Kiss' by Jeremy Carlson

#215 - 18 Jul 2013

Source: CSS Zen Garden12 November 2018

'A Robot Named Jimmy' by meltmedia

Kozea published Weasyprint version 43, a converter from HTML…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page12 November 2018

12 Nov 2018 Kozea published Weasyprint version 43, a converter from HTML + CSS to PDF. (Open Source, Python)

Minutes Telecon 2018-11-07

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 08 November 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1. U…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page08 November 2018

8 Nov 2018 Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Flexible Box Layout Level 1.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 69

Source: Surfin' Safari 07 November 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 69 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 237231-237630.

CSS

Web API

Intersection Observer

Dark Mode

JavaScript

Media

Web Inspector

WebRTC

Payment Request

Storage

New Recommendation: Selectors Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page06 November 2018

6 Nov 2018 New Recommendation: Selectors Level 3.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 68

Source: Surfin' Safari 24 October 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 68 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 236793-237231.

Web API

WebRTC

Media

CSS

Rendering

JavaScript

Web Inspector

WebDriver

Payment Request

Apple Pay

Web Animations

WebCrypto

W3C holds a developer meetup in Lyon on the evening of Monda…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page22 October 2018

22 Oct 2018 W3C holds a developer meetup in Lyon on the evening of Monday 22 October 2018. Among the speakers are Rachel Andrew, Tristan Nitot and Richard Ishida. Members of several W3C working groups will be present. The program also includes demos of several new W3C technologies. (Free, registration required)

Strategic Highlights, what W3C has done — and where we’re heading

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 18 October 2018

graphic showing a light bulb and core innovation technologies in textW3C’s work enables the Web to scale to meet the new challenges and opportunities while selected technologies and features continue to give way to incredible core innovation once again.

Next week W3C will host its annual Technical Plenary and Advisory Committee meeting in Lyon, France at which our CEO, Jeff Jaffe, will present our Strategic Highlights from May to October 2018.

In the last Strategic Highlights we released in May 2018, we mentioned progress in many areas that demonstrate both the vitality of the W3C and the Web community. Of particular note were:

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

WCAG 2.1 image with accessibility icons In May we noted that 2018 would see the first normative update in a decade of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. In June WCAG 2.1 became a W3C Recommendation. WCAG 2 has had an incredible influence; having been adopted as a regulatory requirement in various countries, and also used widely for business and non-governmental sites. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 expands upon guidance developed by W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) over the years, and is used widely around the world to make web content more accessible to people with disabilities.

Moreover, in September the European Union fully adopted WCAG 2.1 in its revision of EN 301 549, the Directive for “Accessibility requirements suitable for public procurement of ICT products and services in Europe”.

Web Authentication

WebAuthn text with a globe and key in the circle of the letter b In April 2018, Web Authentication progressed to Candidate Recommendation. Web Authentication (WebAuthn) is a standard web API that can be incorporated into browsers and related web platform infrastructure, enables strong, unique, public key-based credentials for each site, eliminating the risk that a password stolen from one site can be used on another. WebAuthn has been developed in coordination with FIDO Alliance and is a core component of the FIDO2 Project along with FIDO’s Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) specification.

Telecommunications opportunities for the Web

WebRTC is now a cornerstone of the telecommunications industry. The May 2018 W3C Web5G workshop brought together telecommunications operators, network equipment providers, content delivery networks, browser vendors, and application developers to evaluate and prepare for the impact of 5G and other network-layer technologies on Web standards. During the two days, participants reviewed opportunities that new emerging innovations and capabilities at the application layers can bring to the 5G network. The workshop concluded with the proposed creation of a task force of participants to explore how the 5G and Web communities might work in a productive and cohesive manner.

Testing the Web

The Web Platform Tests suite – a project W3C and its members have given a lot of attention and resources – continues to be very active. The web-platform-tests dashboard, first delivered in 2017 following the integration of automatic generation of test results, will provide a daily snapshot of the evolution of Web interoperability, with continuous improvement. The WebDriver specification, which  became a W3C Recommendation in June, complements this project by adding additional automatic tests of Web browsers to improve interoperability.

Strengthening the Core of the Web; Meeting Industry Needs

svg logohtml5 logo WebAssembly logo purple with the letters W and AWeb Payments screens from all main browsers implementations

The highlights document gave updates on the standards which are core of the Web including: CSS, SVG, HTML, Testing and Performance (including WebAssembly) as well as the Web of Data. At the same time, W3C meets Industry needs with vital work such as: Digital Publishing, Web Payments, Media and Entertainment, Web & Telecommunications (including:  Virtual / Mixed / Augmented Reality → XR, Web5G and WebRTC) as well as Automotive and the Web of Things. W3C’s mission to make a Web for all includes essential work such as Security, Privacy, Internationalization (i18n) and Web Accessibility.

Future Web Standards

The Strategy Funnel documents the staff’s exploration of potential new work at various phases: Exploration and Investigation, Incubation and Evaluation, and eventually the chartering of a new standards group.

All of this work and more has proceeded since May. Next week Jeff Jaffe will give an overview of all that exciting work. We will then release publicly our October W3C Strategic Highlights. Stay tuned for more!

Updated Working Draft: CSS Paged Media Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page18 October 2018

18 Oct 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Paged Media Level 3.

Minutes Telecon 2018-10-17

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 17 October 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Report on the W3C Workshop on Digital Publication Layout and Presentation published.

Source: W3C Blog Ivan Herman • 16 October 2018

The W3C Workshop on Digital Publication Layout and Presentation took place in Tokyo, on the 18th and 19th of September, 2018. Although the Workshop had a general scope on digital publication layout, the emphasis was on what is sometimes called “sequential art”, i.e., comics, mangas, bandes dessinées, etc. The workshop was a great meeting place for an exchange of ideas among publishers, storytellers, and some of the leading experts on CSS or fonts. Numerous issues and challenges were discussed and some further actions were also decided. The workshop organizers have now published the Workshop report and the minutes of the sessions for further reference.

Special thanks go to the members of the Program Committee for their support and contributions, and the Workshop’s host for providing us with perfect meeting facilities.

The Meetup Muster returns for Summit ’18

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 16 October 2018

Last year, long overdue, we added a new feature to our annual Summit, the Meetup Muster.

The Meetup Muster was a cool addition to the event, introducing people to a range of Sydney’s tech meetups (SydCSS, SydJS, React Sydney, SydTechLeaders, SydPWA, Tech Talks). Many people come to conferences but don’t tap into the amazing meetup scene in between, so hopefully the Muster will encourage more people to join their local communities. Or, if there isn’t a meetup that scratches their itch, perhaps they’ll be the ones to start them!

Ben Buchanan, Web Directions Summit 2017 “Big Stonkin’ Post


Photo by JJ Halans, go check out his album of last year’s Summit for many fantastic photos.

We’re excited to be doing it again, with a range of existing, and new, meetup partners, across design and engineering in Sydney. Here’s who’s participating this year.

If you’re attending our Summit, make sure you get along and say Hi! and join a meetup you’ve not joined before.
And if you’re a member of open of these, and are keen to come to Summit, check your inbox or hassle an organiser (don’t hassle them, contact them very nicely, they do amazing stuff for our community) and ask them for a special code to get you a great deal (and thank them for being awesome!)

The post The Meetup Muster returns for Summit ’18 appeared first on Web Directions.

MotionMark 1.1

Source: Surfin' Safari11 October 2018

Two years ago, we released MotionMark, a benchmark for Web graphics. It runs a series of tests that exercise common ways of painting on the Web. We’ve used this benchmark to improve the performance of WebKit and underlying frameworks, and we’re happy to see that others have used the benchmark for their own performance investigations.

Today we are announcing an update to the MotionMark benchmark, which we’re calling version 1.1.

Test updates

First, let’s do a quick review about the benchmark. MotionMark runs a suite of tests that measures a browser’s painting performance by exercising various techniques, including CSS, text, canvas, and SVG. Each test packages a small set of graphics primitives into a single rendering element, and renders as many of them as possible while maintaining 60 fps. That number represents the test’s score. For more details, you can read our introductory blog post.

We want to expose MotionMark to as many aspects of the rendering engine as possible. In our first update to the benchmark, we’ve refreshed two tests in the suite.

The presentation of the Multiply test, which utilizes DOM element painting, caps the maximum number of elements that can be drawn. MotionMark requires tests to be able to stress browsers such that they cannot maintain 60 fps, and some of Apple’s new hardware, like the iPhone Xs, were powerful enough to animate Multiply at the maximum complexity at 60 fps. So we had to make the test harder! We reduced the physical size of each element to fit more of them on the available space and increase that cap threefold. We also updated the ways that an element can be hidden during the test. Before the elements toggled their visibility using visibility: hidden; now they also do so via display: none and opacity: 0.

In the original 1.0 suite, each rendering element in the Leaves test was an image to which translate and rotate transforms were applied. For 1.1 we use the width and height attributes to paint the images in a range of different sizes, and test blending by animating a fade using opacity.

Leveraging MotionMark’s design for easier analysis

MotionMark has enabled us to monitor our graphics performance in WebKit and underlying system frameworks we depend on like CoreAnimation, as well as find opportunities to progress performance. As our experience in regression analysis with this benchmark grew, we found a couple of processes that facilitated our efforts to isolate bottlenecks and verify performance gains.

First, we split tests from the “main” suite into derivative versions based on specific techniques. For example, with the Multiply test update mentioned earlier, we created versions where all of the elements used only one of the CSS techniques for hiding an element. For the Design test we created a version that only contained Latin text, one that used East Asian characters, and one that used right-to-left and complex scripts. Isolating the techniques made it easier to determine which part of the test WebKit regressed, and magnified problems in traces for easier analysis.

Second, we added a way to run a test more simply, with a fixed number of elements. The benchmark uses a ramping controller that varies the painting load such that it repeatedly crosses over the threshold where the browser can no longer render the scene at 60 fps. Analyzing Instruments traces for such a run can be difficult to track a regression, however, since the load is dynamic from frame to frame. MotionMark’s design allows us to plug in different kinds of controllers, and using one that simply rendered a scene at a static complexity facilitated A/B analyses across versions of WebKit and the OS. Subsequent fixes could then be easily verified using both the fixed and ramping controllers.

Results

Using MotionMark as a tool for tracking regressions and discovering ways to progress have been critical for us to improve graphics performance in WebKit. As a result, we’ve made Safari on macOS Mojave and iOS 12 on average over 20% faster on MotionMark 1.1 than in the previous release.

MotionMark 1.1 Results

In conclusion, MotionMark has been updated to version 1.1 to scale better on faster hardware and include more techniques for painting. We hope this benchmark continues to be a useful tool for browsers to optimize their engines for the modern Web.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Animations Level 1. Updated Worki…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page11 October 2018

11 Oct 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Animations Level 1. Updated Working Draft: CSS Transitions.

Minutes Telecon 2018-10-10

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 10 October 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 67

Source: Surfin' Safari 10 October 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 67 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 236195-236793.

Pointer Events

WebRTC

Media

CSS

JavaScript

Web Animations

Shadow DOM

Web API

Apple Pay

Web Inspector

Web Driver

Storage

Updated Working Draft: CSS Values and Units Level 4.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page10 October 2018

10 Oct 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Values and Units Level 4.

CSS Easing Functions Level 1: Last Call for Comments

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 09 October 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Easing Functions Level 1. This module extracts the easing functions from earlier drafts of CSS Transitions into their own module, to more easily reference them from both CSS Transitions and CSS Animations and any other modules that need them.

Changes since the last draft consist of removing the frames() notation in favor of the new jump-* keywords in steps(). Also the module has been renamed (from Timing to Easing), to reflect the possibility of reuse for progress of things over a basis other than time.

As there are no open issues other than some editorial work, and hardly any have been received since the FPWD in February, we expect to transition this module to Candidate Recommendation next month. Consider this the last call for comments. 🙂

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-timing]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated Working Draft: CSS Easing Functions Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page09 October 2018

9 Oct 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Easing Functions Level 1.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 66

Source: Surfin' Safari 29 September 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 66 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 235669-236195.

This release of Safari Technology Preview has a known issue where launching SafariDriver fails.

Web Share API

Conic Gradients

WebRTC

Shadow DOM

CSS

Web Inspector

Web API

Apple Pay

JavaScript

Media

Web Animations

Web Assembly

Password AutoFill

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