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July 02, 2015

London Calling

I’m building a Global Social Business Consulting A-Team @IBM, come join us!

Those eagle eyed London Calling readers may have noticed a slight change to my LinkedIn profile a few months ago.

Back in April, I was promoted to the role of Global Managing Partner, with responsibility to build out our Global Social Consulting practice.

As per the LinkedIn description, this is a brand new role in our IBM Analytics Business Unit, and my role is to bring together the best of IBM’s Smarter Workforce and Social offerings, with world leading consulting services, to develop fully-integrated software and services packages.

My first role in IBM was in our Global Business Services arm, which is the pure-play consulting arm of IBM.

In this new group, we straddle the consulting arm, and the software business, meaning that the team has a unique view of multiple parts of the business. My peers are IBM veterans Jeff Schick, Debbie Landers, Maria Winans and Katrina Troughton, and I report directly to Senior Vice-President Bob Picciano.

Our team is blessed with a range of experience and expertise in many areas of IBM’s existing products and solutions, and as well we have some recent recruits from industry.

You would be joining one of the most exciting and social groups in the company, and as anyone at IBM will tell you, once you’re an “IBMer”, you really get to understand how amazing IBMers truly are.

I still pinch myself every day that after just 18 months in the company I’m now in my dream role.

So the really exciting part of my role, apart from working with some of the best and brightest social minds in IBM, is that I can now recruit a Global Social Consulting A-Team.

Who am I looking for?

So to make the A-Team, you have to be the best at what you’re doing, and I’ve probably heard of you already, seen you speak at a conference, read your book, or passed you in the corridor on the way out from a competitive pitch for a client.

Right now, I need senior, experienced people that I can send into the c-suite to explain to our clients what social business is, and how we can fundamentally improve their business using IBM’s social tools, products and consulting know-how.

You’ve also sold millions of dollars worth of social tools, social consulting or advice over the last few years, and are hungry to sell more.

You also have an amazing social profile, and audience and you are socially eminent in your own right – and yes, if you join IBM I’ll want you to keep blogging, tweeting, and speaking at events to further the IBM message, and also help increase your already high level of eminence.

Also, so as to ensure we don’t waste each other’s time, please NO recruiters, headhunters or agencies. If I can’t find an A-Team via social, then something is wrong!

In the future I will have more junior roles, and I suggest that you get in touch with me later in the year, or attend one of our Tweetups I will be hosting in New York (15th July – follow me @AndrewGrill for details), London, Sydney and Melbourne in the coming months.

Now before you send me a message via my contact form to say you’re keen to know more, read my post from May 2013 titled “Will we start to see the rise (and fall) of the social business guru?“. I’ll ask you about the post if we get to chat by phone or in person, so do make sure you read it first!

I look forward to hearing from you.

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by Andrew Grill at July 02, 2015 09:26 AM

July 01, 2015

London Calling

Wimbledon is the most popular grand slam on social media says @Repucom

wimbledonlogoI have been a big fan of Wimbledon, and back in 2009 before I joined IBM, I went to the Championships as a guest to blog about their use of an Augmented Reality app called Seer – read more here.

Now I am at IBM, I have been very fortunate to be able to attend the Championships and host clients and bloggers, and show them the magic “behind the scenes”.

In 2014, I hosted David Terrar, who posted a fantastic summary of what he saw here, as well as Gabrielle Laine-Peters. This year I am hosting Neville Hobson (@jangles) and Alan Patrick (@freecloud) – all well known in the Social Business circles in Europe.

As such, and with my role as the Global Managing Partner at IBM running our Social Consulting team, I have a vested interest in how Wimbledon is doing on social media.

It was with interest that I spied a report in the Sports Business Daily quoting  a report by Repucom.

The key findings from the report I have summarised below, and the full report can be found here.

Wimbledon is the biggest and best Grand Slam tennis tournament when it comes to engaging and maintaining its social media fan base around the world, a study by Repucom, the sports and entertainment intelligence experts, has found.

Wimbledon is leading all Grand Slam tournaments when it comes to engaging and maintaining its social media fan base. Wimbledon has more Facebook, Twitter and Instagram followers than the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open, with a combined fan base of more than 4.1 million. Roland Garros is in second place with a social media fan base of 3.7 million.

Not only is Wimbledon’s fan base bigger, they’re also “noisier”. Twitter buzz (analysed by tracking the most popular keywords and hashtags associated with each tournament) peaked during the 2014 final with over 585,000 posts. This number was almost double that of any other Grand Slam.

The chart above (Source: Repucon) shows Twitter mentions per day for each tournament in 2014 (measured seven days before start, throughout tournament and seven days after)

This fan base is also engaging more with official content across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and engagement can be translated into potential media value for partners. Using Repucom’s social media valuation methodology, Wimbledon posts which centred on score updates are almost 33% higher than the other grand slam opening days so far in 2015.

Max Barnett, Repucom’s Head of Digital (UK&I) said: “Wimbledon’s use of archive footage among other content themes, or as we call them, “fan stories”, are what drives the tournament’s dominance in tennis while staying true to their strong, brand values. Here fans are not just kept up-to-date with scores during the Slam, they are given exclusive “behind the scenes” access delivered direct to their mobile devices. All this content is packaged up in engaging infographics and short format video.

Great to see how Wimbledon uses an array of rich content to bring the tournament to life for those who can’t actually attend in person.

One way that IBM is helping the All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (or AELTC – the full name of the club that runs Wimbledon and owns the grounds at SW19), is by providing them with an internal Social Command centre to surface this great content in real-time during the tournament.

See a sneak peek below (this is only visible to the AELTC so I can’t share a link unfortunately).

Keep an eye out for blog posts from Neville and Alan after their visits to Wimbledon, and of course follow @Wimbledon for all the best Championship news and views.

I really think I have the best job (and team) in IBM!

PS I’m hiring globally for Social Business Consultants. I am building the World’s leading global Social Consulting team. Contact me if you’re interested or meet me in New York on the 15th June – details soon – follow me @AndrewGrill to get the location.

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by Andrew Grill at July 01, 2015 10:53 AM

June 30, 2015

Open Gardens

Become a Data Scientist for the Internet of Things – download free paper

 

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An Introduction to Deep Learning and it’s role for IoT/ future cities

 

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by ajit at June 30, 2015 03:57 PM

June 26, 2015

Martin's Mobile Technology Page

Book Review: Rebel Code

Rebel-code-coverBack in 2001, Glen Moody published the first edition of "Rebel Code", a book about the early days of Open Source and Free Software in general and about the creation of Linux in particular. It might seem strange to do a book review almost 15 years later but it's a great historic document telling the story of how things came together in the 1990's. The first part of the book focuses on the young Linus Torvalds and how the first Linux kernel version made it to the Internet. The second part of the book then looks at how the Linux kernel evolved in the mid 1990's and its role as the "missing link" in Richard Stallman's Free Software Foundation that completed the Free Software world for the first time. The third part of the book then looks at how graphical user interfaces, web browsers and end user applications not only for nerds came to the Linux world at the end of the 1990's. A great read and I can fully recommend it for those who would like to find out more about open source history and do so from a historic point of view. Both print and e-book editions are (still) available so the book is still easy to get. 

While I knew some of the stories, the book puts all of them in context and into a bigger picture. In other words, it made a lot of things a lot clearer for me. I've been asking myself a lot why Linux was not part of my university life back in the mid 1990s and the book makes it quite clear as well. I have to admit I'm a GUI sort of computer guy and there simply was no usable graphical user interface for Linux before 1998 (sorry, everything before KDE and GNOME was not usable for anything else than showing xterm windows...). In contrast, Windows 3.1 and later versions were on the market since 1991, which is about the time I bought my first IBM compatible PC. In other words until 1998 there was no incentive for me whatsoever to even consider something other than Windows. After university and my first job in a small company I joined Nortel as a programmer and was given an HP Unix machine for software development development with a really ugly Motiv based GUI. Compared to Windows it was stone age and I thought I actually had an old machine. But I know realize that looking at it from a Unix world point of view it was actually state of the art then. That didn't really encourage me to look into the Linux world, either.

But things kept evolving and KDE and GNOME made a real step forward in the 2000s., i.e. only after the book was already written. In addition, StarOffice, closed source at first, also became open source at some point during that timeframe as well. For me having a usable desktop and a usable office suite in addition to an easy way to install a Linux distribution were the final pieces of the puzzle that had to come into place before I would even think about experimenting with Linux. Replacing Windows was actually not my goal at first when I finally started experimenting with Linux in 2008/9 on a netbook. Agreed, I got to the open source side of things very very late but since then it has been an incredible ride and I quickly realized that everything was in place for me to ditch proprietary and closed source software for good. Just last year I kissed the last Windows box at home good bye and I haven't looked back since.

So that's how the book's story continued for me and I'm happy that I know a lot more now of how things evolved up to the point when I started to discover them. Two thumbs up!

by mobilesociety at June 26, 2015 01:47 AM

June 25, 2015

mobiForge blog

Mobile Networks Statistics 2015

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by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 10:23 AM

Mobile Software Statistics 2015

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by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 10:20 AM

Mobile User Behaviour Statistics 2015

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by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 10:14 AM

M-Commerce & M-Banking Statistics 2015

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by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 10:09 AM

Mobile Hardware Statistics 2015

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by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 09:22 AM

25 mobile market statistics that you should know in 2015

We have researched what we believe to be some of the most astounding and notable statistics relating to mobile marketing in 2015 so far. One of the most critical activities of any business is to keep up-to-date with emerging and growing technology. Mobile phone technology has huge potential for any business, and can allow them to reach out to new customers in a very effective way.

by Gregory Twohig at June 25, 2015 09:00 AM

June 20, 2015

Eurotechnology.japan

Masahiro Morimoto, entrepreneur, CEO and Chairman of the Board, UBIC Inc.

UBIC Inc: founded to curb huge losses of Japanese corporations due to litigation abroad From Japanese/Chinese/Korean (CJK) e-discovery, to data forensics, virtual data scientist and predictive coding Masahiro Morimoto founded UBIC Inc. on August 8, 2003 to stem the huge losses he saw Japanese corporations incurring due to litigation abroad. English-only software cannot be used … Continue reading Masahiro Morimoto, entrepreneur, CEO and Chairman of the Board, UBIC Inc.

The post Masahiro Morimoto, entrepreneur, CEO and Chairman of the Board, UBIC Inc. appeared first on Eurotechnology Japan.

by fasol@eurotechnology.com (Gerhard Fasol) at June 20, 2015 01:26 PM

June 19, 2015

mobiForge blog

Geofencing, web push and progressive apps are taking webapps to a new place

There’s a lot going on these days in the world of webapps. Most recently, the W3C published the Geofencing API first public working draft. This API allows webapps to register for notifications when the user’s device enters defined geographical regions, assuming that the user grants permission. This enables a whole new class of webapps to be built and follows the recent rollout of the web push API to Chrome Mobile on Android.

by ronan at June 19, 2015 10:57 AM

June 18, 2015

Eurotechnology.japan

Toshiba accounting restatements in context

Corrections amount to 2 1/2 years (31.5 months) of average annual net profits Sales stagnation combined with almost zero net profit of Japan’s top 8 electronics companies creates increasing pressure to improve performance: top 8 electronics groups stagnate while Japan’s top-7 electronics parts makers thrive Toshiba over the last few weeks published a number of … Continue reading Toshiba accounting restatements in context

The post Toshiba accounting restatements in context appeared first on Eurotechnology Japan.

by fasol@eurotechnology.com (Gerhard Fasol) at June 18, 2015 04:06 PM

Japanese electronics parts makers grow, while Japan’s iconic electronics makers stagnate

Japan’s iconic electronics groups combined are of similar size as the economy of The Netherlands Parts makers’ sales may overtake iconic electronics groups in the near future – they have already in terms of profits In the 25th edition of our analysis of Japan’s huge electronics industry sector, we compare the top 8 iconic electronics … Continue reading Japanese electronics parts makers grow, while Japan’s iconic electronics makers stagnate

The post Japanese electronics parts makers grow, while Japan’s iconic electronics makers stagnate appeared first on Eurotechnology Japan.

by fasol@eurotechnology.com (Gerhard Fasol) at June 18, 2015 03:46 AM

June 15, 2015

mobiForge blog

The HTML5 Pointer Events API: Combining touch, mouse, and pen

The Pointer Events API is an HTML5 specification that combines touch, mouse, pen and other inputs into a single unified API. It is less well supported than the Touch Events API, although support is growing, with all the major browsers working on an implementation, except for Apple's Safari. There's a colorful background to how the current state of browser support for this API came to be which we covered previously on mobiForge, but in this article we'll just look at its usage.

by ruadhan at June 15, 2015 01:42 PM

June 14, 2015

Eurotechnology.japan

Japan Exchange Group CEO Atsushi Saito: proud of Corporate Governance achievements, but ashamed of Toshiba

New Dimensions of Japanese Financial Market Only with freedom and democracy, the values of open society and professionalism can the investment chain function effectively The iconic leader of the Tokyo Stock Exchange since 2007, now Group CEO of the Japan Exchange Group gave a Press Conference at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan on June … Continue reading Japan Exchange Group CEO Atsushi Saito: proud of Corporate Governance achievements, but ashamed of Toshiba

The post Japan Exchange Group CEO Atsushi Saito: proud of Corporate Governance achievements, but ashamed of Toshiba appeared first on Eurotechnology Japan.

by fasol@eurotechnology.com (Gerhard Fasol) at June 14, 2015 10:27 AM

June 13, 2015

Martin's Mobile Technology Page

LTE in 450 MHz in Finland - 5 MHz only (Or Perhaps Less)?

A couple of days ago a reader left a comment to a previous post on LTE 900 MHz in the Netherlands that an LTE network now also went live in the 450 MHz range in Finland. Thanks for that! I was intrigued so I had a closer look. The network seems to address mostly businesses and moving vehicles at first and private summer house owners in Finland a bit later.

What's The Deal For Today's Users?

I tried to find out which band is used for that network but couldn't find a definite source. So I assume it's FDD band 31. If that is indeed the case then it's at 5 MHz carrier at most (for which I don't have a confirmation either so it's a guess, too), compared to 10 MHz used in the 800 MHz band and 15 to 20 MHz carriers used in band 3. In other words capacity and top speeds are quite limited. So from that point of view nothing to write home about. On the other hand a 5 MHz LTE carrier in a summer house far off the beaten path is better than nothing at all, at least today. With rising bandwidth demands, however, a 5 MHz carrier won't cut it for long even in far away places...

The historical perspective

Oh yes, why only 5 MHz? It looks like this is a spot left over from old analog networks (e.g. the C-Netz in Germany, which used 451,30–455,74 MHz and 461,30–465,74 MHz according to Wikipedia. This range is not fully overlapping with LTE FDD band 31 but that's not very surprising because in the 1980's, there was no common European, let alone, worldwide standard. But from a historical perspective the 5 MHz bandwidth is interestig because I always imagined that more bandwidth was used for these networks. And then GSM comes along for which 25 MHz of bandwidth was reserved for each direction, i.e. 5 times as much as for the networks that were in use at that time. Quite a bold move for the time I would say.

by mobilesociety at June 13, 2015 08:38 AM

June 11, 2015

Martin's Mobile Technology Page

LTE Now Also Used In The 900 MHz Band In Europe

Half a decade ago, network operators in Europe have started to use UMTS not only in the 2100 MHz band but also in the 900 MHz band that was, up until then, only used for GSM services. A good example is France with rural coverage and big cities in the UK. Now it seem seems LTE is also getting some traction in what is called LTE band 8. According to a report by Telegeography, T-Mobile Netherlands has started using LTE in the 900 MHz band in Amsterdam. An interesting move, just makes me wonder how much spectrum they have available. On the device side LTE band 8 is already supported by a number of devices, for example by the current generation of Apple devices. In other words there will be immediate use of the extra resources.

by mobilesociety at June 11, 2015 05:45 AM

June 10, 2015

mobiForge blog

5 Ways Google Brillo Can Change The Device Landscape

While it is generally agreed that the Internet of Things could improve the way we interact with devices, its integration into everyday life is somewhat slow. This process may soon accelerate with the introduction of Brillo, Google’s new OS for the IoT ecosystem. Here are 5 ways this new solution could change the device landscape.

by pawelpiejko at June 10, 2015 04:00 PM

Martin's Mobile Technology Page

Tim and the GSM Logo - Some Nostalgia

Tim-and-the-gsm-logoSome heart warming nostalgia today: For some time now, the GSM logo initially designed at the end of the 1980s and used on a lot of GSM related products in the decades afterwards is rarely to be seen these days anymore. But there are some who still use it on new products. Have a look at the new 2015 Telecom Italia SIM card I've recently been given. It's not big and prominent anymore but still there. I wonder what the intention was to put it there. Perhaps by someone with nostalgia in his or her heart? We'll probably never find out but it made me smile nevertheless. And just in case you wonder what the meaning is behind the for dots in the logo, have a look here.

by mobilesociety at June 10, 2015 06:00 AM