9. Design for device-independence.

Slide 10 of 17
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Use features that enable activation of page elements via a variety of input devices.

Device-independent access means that the user may interact with the user agent or document with a preferred input (or output) device -- mouse, keyboard, voice, head wand, or other. If, for example, a form control can only be activated with a mouse or other pointing device, someone who is using the page without sight, with voice input, or with a keyboard or who is using some other non-pointing input device will not be able to use the form.

Note. Providing text equivalents for image maps or images used as links makes it possible for users to interact with them without a pointing device.

Generally, pages that allow keyboard interaction are also accessible through speech input or a command line interface.

Check Checkpoints for guideline 9.

Next slide: Guideline 10.

Introduction: Table-of-Contents Guidelines: Table-of-Contents Checkpoints: Table-of-Contents Examples: Table-of-Contents

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Chuck Letourneau & Geoff Freed

W3C Web Accessibility Initiative

Copyright © 2000 W3C