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Real-time event

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NEW NEW PROPOSAL

When looking at the definition of Real-time event (which is used on 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable, 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide, and 2.2.3 No Timing) it is unclear what is included and not included as real-time events. Currently the definition includes examples of things that are real-time events. But examples of things that are not real-time events would also be helpful.

from 2.2.1

Real-time Exception: The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or

from Understanding WCAG 2.0 for 2.2.1

In some cases, however, it is not possible to change the time limit (for example, for an auction or other real-time event) and exceptions are therefore provided for those cases.

In cases where timing is not an intrinsic requirement but giving users control over timed events would invalidate the outcome, a third party can control the time limits for the user (for example, granting double time on a test).

From Understanding WCAG 2.0 for 2.2.2

Pausing and resuming where the user left off is best for users who want to pause to read content and works best when the content is not associated with a real-time event or status.

from 2.2.3

except for non-interactive synchronized media and real-time events. (Level AAA)

from WCAG 2.0 glossary

 real-time event: 
   event that a) occurs at the same time as the viewing and b) is not completely generated by the content
     Example 1: A Webcast of a live performance (occurs at the same time as the viewing and is not prerecorded). 
     Example 2: An on-line auction with people bidding (occurs at the same time as the viewing). 
     Example 3: Live humans interacting in a virtual world using avatars (is not completely generated by the content and occurs at the same time as the viewing).

[end of quote]

The WCAG2ICT Task force asks WCAG WG to add following to the INTENT section of 2.2.1 (Timing Adjustable), 2.2.2 (Pause, Stop, Hide), and 2.2.3 (No Timing) in Understanding WCAG 2.0.

[start of addition]


Examples of things that are NOT real-time exceptions

The following are examples of things that may have time limits but are NOT real-time events, and are therefore covered by this success criterion (i.e. they are not exceptions):

  1. A single-player educational game that is not linked to any events that are happening in the real world, independent of the game
  2. A virtual world with no other human controlled actors, nor any ties to events that are happening in the real world, independent of the virtual world
  3. An online interactive simulation of a personnel management event with the intent to teach users how to react in specific ways within specific time frames would not be tied to a "real-time event" simply because it was timed, since if it was started later the end would be later. The end would not be tied to any particular real time (wall clock time). And giving the user the ability to slow it down may be important to their ability to use it.

HOWEVER, for any of these:

  • If timing is essential to the task however, then it would not be an exception for being a real-time event - but it would be an exception under the 'essential' exception. (The goal however should be to redesign the task to not require the time limit.
  • If actions in the task must occur in concert with any real world events then it would be a real-time exception
  • If there is a specific date/time requirement where that date/time occurs within the time it takes to do the task then there would be a real-time exception.


[end of addition]





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NEW PROPOSAL

When looking at the definition of Real-time event (which is used on 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable, 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide, and 2.2.3 No Timing) it is unclear what is included and not included as real-time events. Currently the definition includes examples of things that are real-time events. But examples of things that are not real-time events would also be helpful.

from 2.2.1

Real-time Exception: The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or

from Understanding WCAG 2.0 for 2.2.1

In some cases, however, it is not possible to change the time limit (for example, for an auction or other real-time event) and exceptions are therefore provided for those cases.

In cases where timing is not an intrinsic requirement but giving users control over timed events would invalidate the outcome, a third party can control the time limits for the user (for example, granting double time on a test).

From Understanding WCAG 2.0 for 2.2.2

Pausing and resuming where the user left off is best for users who want to pause to read content and works best when the content is not associated with a real-time event or status.

from 2.2.3

except for non-interactive synchronized media and real-time events. (Level AAA)

from WCAG 2.0 glossary

 real-time event: 
   event that a) occurs at the same time as the viewing and b) is not completely generated by the content
     Example 1: A Webcast of a live performance (occurs at the same time as the viewing and is not prerecorded). 
     Example 2: An on-line auction with people bidding (occurs at the same time as the viewing). 
     Example 3: Live humans interacting in a virtual world using avatars (is not completely generated by the content and occurs at the same time as the viewing).

[end of quote]

The WCAG2ICT Task force asks WCAG WG to add following to the INTENT section of 2.2.1 (Timing Adjustable), 2.2.2 (Pause, Stop, Hide), and 2.2.3 (No Timing) in Understanding WCAG 2.0.

[start of addition]

The following are examples of things that may have time limits but are NOT real-time events, and are therefore covered by this success criterion (i.e. they are not exceptions):

  • a single-player educational game that is not linked to any events that are happening in the real world, independent of the game, for example, there is a specific date/time requirement.
  • a virtual world with no other human controlled actors, nor any ties to events that are happening in the real world, independent of the virtual world.

An online interactive simulation of a personnel management event with the intent to teach users how to react in specific ways within specific time frames might would not be tied to a "real-time event" simply because it was timed, since if it was started later the end would be later. The end would not be tied to any particular real time (wall clock time). And giving the user the ability to slow it down may be important to their ability to use it. If timing is essential to the task however, then it would not be an exception for being a real-time event - but it would be an exception under the 'essential' exception. The goal however should be to redesign the exercise to not require the time limit.

[end of addition]






WCAG2ICT PROPOSAL

When looking at the definition of Real-time event (which is used on 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable, 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide, and 2.2.3 No Timing) it is unclear what is included and not included as real-time events. Currently the definition includes examples of things that are real-time events. But examples of things that are not real-time events would also be helpful.

[quoting from WCAG 2.0]

 real-time event: 
   event that a) occurs at the same time as the viewing and b) is not completely generated by the content
     Example 1: A Webcast of a live performance (occurs at the same time as the viewing and is not prerecorded). 
     Example 2: An on-line auction with people bidding (occurs at the same time as the viewing). 
     Example 3: Live humans interacting in a virtual world using avatars (is not completely generated by the content and occurs at the same time as the viewing).

[end of quote]

The WCAG2ICT Task force asks WCAG WG to add following to the INTENT section of 2.2.1 (Timing Adjustable), 2.2.2 (Pause, Stop, Hide), and 2.2.3 (No Timing) in Understanding WCAG 2.0.

[start of addition]

The following are examples of things that have time limits but are NOT real-time events, and are therefore covered by this success criterion:

  • a single-player educational game not linked to real-world events
  • a virtual world with no other human controlled actors or ties to real-world events

An online interactive simulation of a personnel management event with the intent to teach users how to react in specific ways within specific time frames

  • would not be real-time if it is a single-person training program. This is the same as a single-player game. Being able to slow it down would be important.
  • but it would be real-time if there are multiple people in the training at the same time, because it then is connected to the real world by other people and would be real-time. Being able to slow it down may be important here as well, but the real-time nature makes it not practical and it would be covered by the exception.
  • if it were a (single-person) test of some type, and timing was important to the test, then it would fall under the essential exception (if there were no way to conduct the test without the timing) - but it still would not the real-time exception

[end of addition]