The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

Minutes Telecon 2018-07-18

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 19 July 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 61

Source: Surfin' Safari 18 July 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 61 is now available for download for macOS High Sierra and the beta of macOS Mojave. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra and in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave. This release covers WebKit revisions 233256-233728.

CSS

Dark Mode

Web API

Service Workers

Media

WebRTC

Web Assembly

Web Inspector

Accessibility

Exploring CSS property definitions

Source: W3C Blog François Daoust • 16 July 2018

Reffy and CSS specifications

Reffy is a specification exploration tool that Dominique Hazaël-Massieux and I developed as a side project during W3C Geek Week a couple of years ago to explore cross-dependencies of JavaScript APIs specifications. Reffy crawls, parses, analyzes, and reports on potential anomalies that specifications may have. Reffy reports are published on a daily basis and help detect issues such as invalid WebIDL content or missing normative references. The dump of the WebIDL content defined in each specification is now also used to create WebIDL tests in the Web Platform Tests effort.

Reffy was essentially restricted to specifications that define some WebIDL content. For Geek Week this year, Dominique and I wondered whether we could extend Reffy to support CSS specifications:

  1. Could we extract all CSS property/descriptor definitions from specifications automatically?
  2. Could we create a useful syntax tree out of the CSS property/descriptor value definitions automatically?
  3. Would it reveal potential issues in CSS specs? Would it be useful to improve the quality of the specifications, to automate the creation of tests, or to create/maintain documentation?

Outcomes

We identified and added about 100 CSS specifications to the list of specifications crawled by Reffy, looking at specifications published as W3C Technical reports, as well as Editor’s Drafts from the CSS Working Group, the FX Task Force and the Houdini Task Force.

Reffy can now successfully extract all CSS property/descriptor definitions from these specifications (544 CSS properties as of today), and parse all value definitions that follow the Value Definition Syntax.

A number of issues have been raised against CSS specifications along the way (see CSS Value Definition Syntax issues for details), notably to report invalid value definitions per the syntax and editorial updates that would help automate the extraction and parsing of definitions. The Value Definition Syntax was most likely not created with automated parsing in mind. We could not spot places where definitions were really ambiguous for human beings, but the syntax could perhaps be improved to ease automated processing and prevent any misunderstanding.

Comparing the information we extracted with MDN data, we detected and reported some outdated info on MDN related to scroll-snap properties and offset-* properties.

Possible next steps

We will continue to investigate the integration with MDN data. That data is currently maintained manually by the community. The possibility to automate part of this process would improve accuracy.

We did not have enough time to run a deep analysis of the resulting syntax tree. Such an analysis might reveal further specification issues. On top of improving the quality of CSS specifications, it should be easy to create a CSS property explorer similar to WebIDLPedia (this one being restricted, as its name suggests, to the exploration of WebIDL used across specifications) out of the list of properties extracted.

In specifications that define JavaScript APIs, WebIDL definitions can be used to create interface tests automatically, using idlharness.js. Similar tests can probably be created for CSS. We confess being more familiar with JavaScript APIs though. It may be that parsing CSS is not a major source of interoperability issues. Would such tests be as useful as WebIDL ones?

The extraction and parsing currently only works for CSS properties and descriptors. It could be interesting to cover at-rules and selectors as well. This may be more challenging though, as actual prose seems to prevail in that area, with fewer parseable code definitions.

Updated CR of CSS Text Decoration Level 3

Source: CSS WG Blog fantasai • 04 July 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Text Decoration 3. This module contains the features of CSS relating to text decoration, such as underlines, text shadows, and emphasis marks.

This update closes out a variety of issues filed since the previous publication in 2013. See the Disposition of Comments. Significant changes since the last Candidate Recommendation are listed in the Changes section.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-text-decor-3]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 60

Source: Surfin' Safari 03 July 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 60 is now available for download for macOS High Sierra and the beta of macOS Mojave. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra and in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave. This release covers WebKit revisions 232790-233256.

Known Issues

Web Animations

Dark Mode

Web Inspector

Media

CSS

WebRTC

Security

Plug-ins

Intelligent Tracking Prevention

WebDriver

Accessibility

Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Text Decoration Level …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page03 July 2018

3 Jul 2018 Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Text Decoration Level 3.

What’s new in Chromium 67 and Opera 54

Source: Dev.OperaFredrik Söderqvist • 28 June 2018

Opera 54 (based on Chromium 67) for Mac, Windows, Linux is out! To find out what’s new for users, see our Desktop blog post. Here’s what it means for web developers.

Generic Sensors

Sensor data is used in many native applications to enable experiences like immersive gaming, fitness tracking, and augmented or virtual reality. This data is now available to web applications using the Generic Sensor API. The Generic Sensors API provides a foundation for sensors in the form of a base Sensor interface and associated abstract operations. Concrete sensors are provided on top of this specification. The following are some of the concrete sensors:

Additional resources:

Other Features in this Release

SVG

SVG2 requires <foreignObject> to be a stacking context. Making <foreignObject> a stacking context means HTML content within a <foreignObject> will integrate better with other content.

DOM

DOMTokenList.replace() now returns a boolean value indicating if the replacement was successful or not. This allows code that for instance takes different paths depending on whether a replacement occurred, to avoid an extra condition using contains().

HTML > Custom Elements

Custom Elements can now extend HTML elements to inherit the semantics of native, built-in elements. This avoids reimplementing built-in functionality such as accessibility, semantics and JavaScript methods/properties.

Input

Mouse events (mousedown, auxclick, mouseup) will now be dispatched for back and forward buttons on mice with more than four buttons. This allows back and forward mouse buttons to be prevented by applications, such as games, that wish to override them.

On Windows the right-hand Alt key serves as AltGraph (ISO-Level-3-Shift) on some layouts, such as many European language layouts, to allow generating additional printable-characters. Internally the key generates Ctrl+Alt modifiers, so that Opera reports all of Control, Alt and AltGraph in the flags for these keys. In this change, Opera distinguishes AltGraph from Ctrl+Alt under Windows for consistency with these modifiers on other platforms.

For developers this removes an edge-case from keyboard event modifier handling. If an app handles keydown/keypress/keyup to implement shortcuts, it will no longer need workarounds to cope with certain (mainly European) keyboard layouts. For example, if an app uses Ctrl+# as a shortcut then previously the app would need to check for both Ctrl, and for AltGraph, otherwise French users would not be able to use it. This change applies to Windows only.

JavaScript

JavaScript now supports a numeric primitive for arbitrary precision integers. Previously, numbers in JavaScript were represented as double-precision floats, thus giving them limited precision. Using the BigInt() function and ‘n' suffix on numeric literals you can store and operate on large integers beyond the safe integer limit for numbers.

Layout

Formatting contexts will now behave exactly like floats do when they are positioned. In other words, they no longer consider the shape-outside property of the float when positioning is determined, and are instead positioned according to their margin box. The new behavior can be seen in this example by changing the height of the flex class. This also affects how new formatting contexts are sized and positioned.

Loading

Client Hints enable origins to receive device-specific preferences in the HTTP request headers. The Accept-CH-Lifetime header field adds a client hint that allows origins to persist their opt-in policy for a specified period so they can receive client hints on navigation requests. Additionally, on the first page load, this feature provides hints for all subresources of the page.

For more on Client Hints, see Automating Resource Selection with Client Hints by Ilya Grigorik.

Streams

Stream API support has been extended with TransformStream. Transform streams enable transforming data in stream form. It can for example be used to pipe between a ReadableStream and a WritableStream. The following example uses a TransformStream to decode text received in a streaming response body:

function textDecodeTransform() {
  const decoder = new TextDecoder();
  return new TransformStream({
      transform(chunk, controller) {
        controller.enqueue(decoder.decode(chunk, { stream: true }));
      }
  });
}

fetch(url).then(response => {
  // response.body is a stream of Uint8Array chunks.
  // But if we want chunks of text:
  const stream = response.body.pipeThrough(textDecodeTransform());
  // …
});

Shadow DOM

The <slot> element can now participate in a flat layout tree, with UA style display: contents. Before this change, a CSS selector would not match a <slot> element. Now selectors match and children will inherit from the <slot> element.

Deprecations and Interoperability Improvements

HTTP-Based Public Key Pinning is deprecated

HTTP-Based Public Key Pinning (HPKP) was intended to allow websites to send an HTTP header that pins one or more of the public keys present in the site’s certificate chain. It has very low adoption, and although it provides security against certificate misissuance, it also creates risks of denial of service and hostile pinning.

To defend against certificate misissuance, web developers should use the Expect-CT header, including its reporting function. Expect-CT is safer than HPKP due to the flexibility it gives site operators to recover from configuration errors, and due to the built-in support offered by a number of CAs.

We expect to remove this in Opera 56 (Chromium 69).

AppCache deprecated in Non-secure Contexts

AppCache over HTTP is deprecated. AppCache is a powerful feature that allows offline and persistent access to an origin. Allowing AppCache to be used over non-secure contexts makes it an attack vector for cross-site scripting hacks. Removal is expected in Opera 56 (Chromium 69).

Layout / CSS

Two Webkit-prefixed CSS properties were been removed in this release - -webkit-box-flex-group and -webkit-box-lines. Percent (%) values are no longer accepted by the -webkit-line-clamp property.

What’s next?

If you’re interested in experimenting with features that are in the pipeline for future versions of Opera, we recommend following our Opera Developer stream.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Grid Layout Level 2.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page28 June 2018

28 Jun 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Grid Layout Level 2.

Minutes Telecon 2018-06-27

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 27 June 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Call for Participation: W3C Workshop on Digital Publication Layout and Presentation (from Manga to Magazines)

Source: W3C Blog Bill McCoy • 26 June 2018

The W3C announced today the latest in a series of workshops exploring the capabilities needed to ensure that the Web delivers on its full potential as a universal platform for digital publishing.

The upcoming technical workshop will be held September 18-19 in Tokyo, Japan. It will focus on evaluating the current status and exploring future directions of visually-rich long-form digital publications based on Web Technologies (particularly CSS, the formatting language of the Web), encompassing both fixed and dynamic layouts. Such “high-design” publications, with complex or sophisticated layout, may be sequential art (Comics, Manga, Bandes-Dessinées, etc.), magazines, picture books, cookbooks, educational materials, etc.

Anyone may request to attend at no charge and the W3C welcomes participation by both speakers and non-speaking attendees with relevant expertise. Early expression of interest in attending is encouraged due to limited space.

The workshop will emphasize the application of theory and technology to meet practical ecosystem needs.  Participants in the workshop will:

Attendees are expected to include:

The Call for Participation is now open.

This W3C Workshop will take place at Keio University’s historic Mita campus, hosted by Keio’s Advanced Publishing Laboratory.

Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page26 June 2018

26 Jun 2018 Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3.

CSS Basic User Interface Module Level 3 reaches Recommendation

Source: CSS WG Blog Florian Rivoal • 21 June 2018

The CSS WG has published the CSS Basic User Interface Module Level 3 as a Recommendation.

This specification describes user interface related properties and values to style HTML and XML. It includes and extends user interface related features from the properties and values of CSS level 2 revision 1. It uses various properties and values to style basic user interface elements in a document: box-sizing, outline (and related longhand properties), resize, text-overflow, cursor, and caret-color.

There were a few editorial changes since publication as a Proposed Recommendation, listed in the Changes section. An Implementation Report is available.

Errata will be maintained as necessary. Further refinements or extensions on the topics covered by this specification continue in CSS Basic User Interface Module Level 4, except for the box-sizing property, which will be maintained in the CSS Intrinsic & Extrinsic Sizing Module Level 3.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-ui-3], [css-ui-4], or [css-sizing-3] as appropriate) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Minutes Telecon 2018-06-20

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 21 June 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

New Recommendation: CSS Basic User Interface Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page21 June 2018

21 Jun 2018 New Recommendation: CSS Basic User Interface Level 3.

Web Animations in WebKit

Source: Surfin' Safari20 June 2018

Over the last 8 months we have been working on adding support for Web Animations, a W3C standard offering Web developers a JavaScript API to create, query and controls animations. While there is work left to do to ship this experimental feature to the Web at large, we feel our implementation has matured enough that, with the release of Safari Technology Preview 59, we can turn Web Animations on by default for our Web developer audience.

An Animation API for the Web

Browser engines have supported various animation features for many years, CSS Transitions and CSS Animations being two widely-supported approaches to authoring efficient animations on the Web. While these features have proven popular, they become limited when developers try to integrate browser-implemented animations via JavaScript:

For instance, developers would have to resort to code such as this to slide an element 100 pixels to the right:

const element = document.getElementById("my-element");

// Set the start value and transition properties.
element.style.transform = "translateX(0)";
element.style.transitionProperty = "transform";
element.style.transitionDuration = "1s";

// Force a style invalidation.
window.getComputedStyle(element);

// Set the end value.
element.style.transform = "translateX(100px)";

This approach is not elegant as it forces a style invalidation that causes extra work rather than just letting the browser invalidate styles at the most appropriate time. And this is just one single transition, but what if another library in your webpage also needed to create a transition? This would multiply forced style invalidation for no good reason.

The value of Web Animations lies in having a JavaScript API that preserves the ability to let the browser engine do the heavy lifting of running animations efficiently while enabling more advanced control of your animations. Using Web Animations, we can rewrite the code above with a single method call:¬…

element.animate({ transform: ["translateX(0)", "translateX(100px)"] }, 1000);

A single method call and you’re done! But that’s not all, now you can harness the power of Web Animations with a full-featured API to control this animation:

// Obtain a reference to the animation we created above.
const animation = element.getAnimations()[0];
// Seek the animation to 500ms.
animation.currentTime = 500;
// Pause the animation.
animation.pause();

The Web Animations API is very powerful, for instance letting you get a list of all running animations on the document or an individual element, use promises to run code when an animation is ready to start or has completed, reverse an animation, etc.

Integration with CSS

The Web Animations specification goes further than specifying a JavaScript API. It provides a timing and animation model for web browsers to implement features such as CSS Transitions and CSS Animations. In fact, in WebKit, we’ve updated our implementation of these existing CSS technologies so that the same CSS Transitions and Animations you’ve been authoring for years are now represented as Web Animations objects in the browser. Using the getAnimations() method, you can obtain a reference to a CSSTransition or CSSAnimation object which are Animation subclasses. Then you can seek or pause a CSS transition running on an element just like we did above with an animation created using element.animate(). As a developer, you can think of CSS Transitions and Animations as a declarative layer above Web Animations.

Help Wanted

We’re very excited to be bringing the power of Web Animations to WebKit and enabling the technology in Safari Technology Preview 59. But there is still a fair bit of work ahead and we need your help to ensure we have a quality implementation before enabling the feature in Safari. We encourage you to try the new API and report issues that you find, bearing in mind that our current implementation is a bit behind the current state of the specification, and you can track all API changes with bug #186518.

It’s also important to check your existing content using CSS Transitions and Animations for possible regressions. One way to see if a regression you might be seeing is caused by the new Web Animations implementation, try toggling “Web Animations and CSS Integration” under the DevelopExperimental Features menu and see if your page’s behavior differs.

New Recommendation: CSS Color Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page19 June 2018

19 Jun 2018 New Recommendation: CSS Color Level 3.

The CSS Days 2018 in Amsterdam are this year on 14 & 15 …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page14 June 2018

14 Jun 2018 The CSS Days 2018 in Amsterdam are this year on 14 & 15 June (with workshops on the 13th). The first day's theme is user interaction. Speakers include Eric Meyer and Greg Whitworth.

Minutes Berlin F2F 2018-04-12 Part II: CSS Tablets, Text L3, Overflow L3, CSS Contain, CSS 2.x, Testing

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 09 June 2018

CSS Tables

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Text L3

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Overflow 3

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Contain

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS 2.x

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Testing

Full Meeting Minutes

Minutes Berlin F2F 2018-04-12 Part I: Flexbox, Overflow, MultiCol, FX Specs Location, Publications and Editors, Grid 2, CSS Display

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 09 June 2018

Flexbox

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Overflow

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

MultiCol

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

FX Specs Location

Full Meeting Minutes

Publications and Editors

Full Meeting Minutes

CSS Grid 2

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Display

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Minutes Berlin F2F 2018-04-11 Part II: CSS Scoll Snap, CSS Text 3, Web Animations, CSS Fonts, CSS Text & Text Decoration, Ruby

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 09 June 2018

CSS Scroll-Snap

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Text 3

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Web Animations

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Fonts

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Text & Text Decoration

Full Meeting Minutes || Specs Referenced: CSS Text, CSS Text Decoration

Ruby

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

Minutes Berlin F2F 2018-04-11 Part I: CSS Contain, CSS Scoping, CSS Pseudo Elements, CSSOM, CSS UI 4, CSS Timing

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 09 June 2018

CSS Contain

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Scoping

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSS Pseudo Elements

Full Meeting Minutes || Spec Referenced

CSSOM

Minutes Telecon 2018-06-06

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 08 June 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

New Note: CSS Speech.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page05 June 2018

5 Jun 2018 New Note: CSS Speech.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 57

Source: Surfin' Safari 31 May 2018

Safari Technology Preview Release 57 is now available for download for macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 231553-232108.

This version of Safari Technology Preview will no longer run on macOS Sierra. To continue testing or living on the latest enhancements to Safari and WebKit, please upgrade to macOS High Sierra.

JavaScript

Animations

Storage Access API

Security

Media

Accessibility

WebDriver

Web Inspector

Minutes Telecon 2018-05-30

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 31 May 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

CSS Writing Modes: L3 Updated, L4 to Candidate Recommendation

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 29 May 2018

The CSS WG has published an updated Candidate Recommendation of CSS Writing Modes Level 3 and a Candidate Recommendation of CSS Writing Modes Level 4 (as promised).

CSS Writing Modes defines CSS support for various international writing modes, such as left-to-right (e.g. Latin or Indic), right-to-left (e.g. Hebrew or Arabic), bidirectional (e.g. mixed Latin and Arabic) and vertical (e.g. Asian scripts).

The publication is a minor update to Level 3 (and corresponding update to Level 4) to correctly handle max-height (in addition to height) when calculating auto sizes of orthogonal flows. Otherwise the only change to Level 4 was to upgrade its status to “Candidate Recommendation”, to match where the featureset was at when it was deferred from Level 3.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-writing-modes]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

CSS Multi-column Layout Level 1 updated Working Draft

Source: CSS WG Blog Rachel Andrew • 28 May 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of the CSS Multi-column Layout Module Level 1. This module describes multi-column layout in CSS. By using functionality described in this document, style sheets can declare that the content of an element is to be laid out in multiple columns.

In October 2017, the module was republished as a Working Draft (from previous CR status) due to the large number of legacy resolutions, and outstanding issues that required work. This new Working Draft includes edits to address those issues. We would appreciate feedback on those edits, which are detailed in the Changes section of the spec, with links to the relevant GitHub issue.

Feedback and Issues

The open issues are listed on GitHub, and this would be the preferred way to send feedback on the specification. If you have thoughts on an existing issue please add a comment. If you have a new Multi-column related thought or have spotted a problem in the specification, please raise a new issue. If you cannot post to GitHub then posting to www-style with the spec code [css-multicol] and your comment topic in the subject line is an option. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

 

 

 

Updated Working Draft: CSS Multi-column Layout Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page28 May 2018

28 May 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Multi-column Layout Level 1.

Updated CR of the CSS Containment Module Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog Florian Rivoal • 24 May 2018

The CSS WG has published a Candidate Recommendation and invites implementations of the CSS Containment Module Level 1. This CSS module describes the contain property, which indicates that the element’s subtree is independent of the rest of the page. This enables heavy optimizations by user agents when used well.

This update to the previous CR brings bug fixes and clarifications. No new feature has been added, nor has any feature been removed. All changes since the previous CR come with a test in Web Platform tests.

Significant changes sine the last CR are listed in the Changes section. A disposition of comments is available.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-contain]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

The Code Leaders program is live!

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 24 May 2018

You spend years developing you capabilities as a developer program and architect, and so one day, you’re asked to do something entirely unrelated–manage people. To interview and hire, mentor and lead. To influence decision makers in your organisation.

And yet few companies and organisations help people prepare for and grow within these roles.

So, last year we launched a new conference, Code Leaders, focussing on the challenges that more senior engineering professionals in our industry face. The focus in 2017 was around two thirds engineering, and one third leadership and management, but after feedback from attendees (which was overwhelmingly positive), we’ve changed up that focus to be more on the latter, and less on the former.

The day begins with a session on the current front end landscape, with presentations by Sara Soueidan on the current state of CSS and SVG, and Marcos Caceres on the Web Platform–browser APIs and more.

Our second session focusses on hiring and building world class teams, with Ryan Biggs looking at the challenge of hiring juniors, Stefano Fratini outlining how they’ve built a world class engineering team at SiteMinder. We wrap the hiring session with Emma Jones focussing on unconscious bias, and techniques for overcoming its influence on team building.

After a fantastic lunch, we’ll return to focus on leadership and management techniques, including insights into leadership from data with Jo Cranford, a deep dive into the ‘Team of Teams‘ model as developed by US General Stanley McChrystal with Kevin Yank, and rounded out by a frequently requested session on managing remote teams (and managing remotely) by former DTO CTO Lindsay Holmwood.

The final session of the day focusses on you–developing your capacities and capabilities, the ethics of what you work on and who you work for–your “why” in Simon Sinek’s terms. Karolina Szczur will consider more ethical tech innovation, Jeremy Nagel argues that being a missionary, rather than a mercenary might be in your best interest (as well as the right thing to do), and the day finishes with the inspirational Isabel Nyo who’ll help you Survive & Thrive as an Engineering Leader.

Throughout the day participants are seated at round tables with 7 others, and a facilitator to help make sure great conversations and connections take place. It’s as much about sharing experiences ideas and connections as it is about the (amazing) content.

If you lead and manage teams, or aspire to doing so, Code Leaders is for you, and we’d love to see you there!

The post The Code Leaders program is live! appeared first on Web Directions.

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