The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

Program for W3C Publishing Summit Announced

Source: W3C Blog Bill McCoy • 17 August 2017

openweb quote illustration The program for the inaugural W3C Publishing Summit (taking place November 9-10, 2017 in the San Francisco Bay Area) has just been announced. The program will feature keynotes from Internet pioneer and futurist Tim O’Reilly and Adobe CTO Abhay Parasnis. along with dozens of other speakers and panelists who will showcase and discuss how web technologies are shaping publishing today, tomorrow, and beyond.

Publishing and the web interact in innumerable ways. From schools to libraries, from design to production to archiving, from metadata to analytics, from New York to Paris to Buenos Aires to Tokyo, the Summit will show how web technologies are making publishing more accessible, more global, and more efficient and effective. Mozilla user experience lead and author Jen Simmons will showcase the ongoing revolution in CSS. Design experts Laura Brady, Iris Febre and Nellie McKesson will cover putting the reader first when producing ebooks and automating publishing workflows. We’ll also hear from reading system creator Micah Bowers (Bluefire) and EPUB pioneers George Kerscher (DAISY) and Garth Conboy (Google).

The newly-unveiled program will also showcase insights from senior leaders from across the spectrum of publishing and digital content stakeholders including Jeff Jaffe (CEO, W3C), Yasushi Fujita (CEO, Media DO), Rick Johnson (SVP Product and Strategy, Ingram/VitalSource), Ken Brooks (COO, Macmillan Learning), Liisa McCloy-Kelley (VP, Penguin Random House), and representatives from Rakuten Kobo, NYPL, University of Michigan Library/Publishing, Wiley, Hachette Book Group, Editis, EDRLab, and more.

I’m very excited about this new event which represents an important next milestone in the expanded Publishing@W3C initiative and I hope you will join us. Register now. For more information on the event, see the W3C Publishing Summit 2017 homepage and Media Advisory.

Sponsors of the W3C Publishing Summit include Ingram/VitalSource, SPi Global, and Apex. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available, email me at bmccoy@w3.org for more information. The Publishing Summit is one of several co-located events taking place during W3C’s major annual gathering, TPAC, for which registration is open for W3C members.

Minutes Telecon 2017-08-16

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 17 August 2017

Full Minutes

Code 17 in 100 Tweets

Source: Web Directions BlogRicky Onsman • 15 August 2017

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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: ordering coffee
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Damon Oehlman
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Ben Teese
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: a diverse audience
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: coffee ordering system is built in Preact
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: size isn't all that matters in performance
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley web font tips
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: The browser is not a policeman
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley sketch
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: sketch notes
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: PWA Taiwan
Code 17: trending second
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: speaker dinner
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Day 2 Yarra
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Day 2 begins
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: two attendees
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: coffee merging and publishing
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mandy Michael nervous
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: page loading Andrew Betts
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: webpage size performance
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: packet communication as a chat log
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: OSI at a Front End conference
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Andrew Betts summary
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Andrew Betts
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: CSS discussion
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mark Dalgleish
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mark Dalgliesh slides
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Nicole Sullivan shoutout
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Glen Maddern styled components
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Glen Maddern
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: it's the foundations you build on
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mandy Michael on style guides
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mandy Michael
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: CSS is not easy
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: the future of AI is scary and exciting
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick likes sketchnote
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick tweets live
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick thanks Web Directions
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Aimree Maree accessibility
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: accessibility and javascript
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: javascript accessibility
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Charlotte Jackson
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: caniuse @supports
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: feature queries
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Marcos Caceres form autocomplete
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Marcos Caceres Payment API
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head world of animation
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head fun and energy
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head comparing JS frameworks
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head on web animation
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: service workers
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: the many different ways people use the web
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: conference close

The post Code 17 in 100 Tweets appeared first on Web Directions.

What’s new in Chromium 60 and Opera 47

Source: Dev.OperaFredrik Söderqvist • 15 August 2017

Opera 47 (based on Chromium 60) for Mac, Windows, Linux is out! To find out what’s new for users, see our Desktop blog post. Here’s what it means for web developers.

Paint Timing API

While no generalized metric perfectly captures when a page is loaded in all cases, First Paint and First Contentful Paint are invaluable numbers to measure critical user moments during loading. To give developers better insight into their site’s loading performance, the new Paint Timing API exposes metrics that capture First Paint and First Contentful Paint.

CSS font-display

Downloadable web fonts are often used to create more visually rich web experiences. Historically, Opera has delayed rendering text until the specified font is available, to ensure visual correctness. However, downloading a font can take as long as several seconds on a poor connection, significantly delaying the time until a user sees content. Opera now supports the CSS font-display property as part of an @font-face descriptor, allowing developers to specify how and when Opera displays text content while downloading fonts.

Credential Management API improvements

Starting in Opera 47, PasswordCredential also contains the user’s password, alleviating the need for a custom fetch() to access a stored password.

Some changes has also been made to to better align with the work being done in the Web Authentication Working Group. This includes the deprecation of requireUserMediation, which has been renamed to preventSilentAccess.

Other features in this release

Deprecations and interoperability improvements

What’s next?

If you’re interested in experimenting with features that are in the pipeline for future versions of Opera, we recommend following our Opera Developer stream.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview Release 37

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 08 August 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 37 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 219567-220128.

Web API

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WebAssembly

Apple Pay

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CR of CSS Containment Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog Florian Rivoal • 08 August 2017

The CSS WG has published a Candidate Recommendation and invites implementations of the CSS Containment Module Level 1.

This CSS module describes the contain property, which indicates that the element’s subtree is independent of the rest of the page. This enables heavy optimizations by user agents when used well.

This is the first CR of this drafts. Implementations are encouraged, and feedback based on them much welcome. In particular, comments about interaction with other specifications would be very welcome, and you find desirable optimization opportunities that this technology fails to facilitate, the CSSWG would like to hear from you.

Significant changes are listed in the change section of the specification, and a disposition of comments is available.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-contain]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

First Public Working Draft of CSS Fonts Level 4

Source: CSS WG Blog Myles Maxfield • 08 August 2017

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of CSS Fonts Level 4. This module defines new features regarding variable fonts, font loading timeline configuration, and color fonts support.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-fonts]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page08 August 2017

8 Aug 2017 New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1.

You can now follow the CSS Working Group's discussions via M…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page04 August 2017

4 Aug 2017 You can now follow the CSS Working Group's discussions via Mastodon, in addition to Twitter, the blog and the blog's Atom feed.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Typed OM Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page01 August 2017

1 Aug 2017 Updated Working Draft: CSS Typed OM Level 1.

Minutes Telecon 2017-07-26

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 27 July 2017

Full Minutes

Adobe Announces Flash Distribution and Updates to End

Source: Surfin' Safari Apple's WebKit Team • 25 July 2017

Adobe has announced it will stop distributing and updating Flash Player at the end of 2020 and is encouraging web developers to migrate any existing Flash content to open standards. Apple is working with Adobe, industry partners, and developers to complete this transition.

Apple users have been experiencing the web without Flash for some time. iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch never supported Flash. For the Mac, the transition from Flash began in 2010 when Flash was no longer pre-installed. Today, if users install Flash, it remains off by default. Safari requires explicit approval on each website before running the Flash plugin.

To display rich interactive content in the browser, WebKit—the engine that powers Safari—supports the latest standards, including the following:

The WebKit Project is excited about the future of the open web. We invite you to follow this blog to learn about new technologies as they’re implemented in WebKit.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 36

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 21 July 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 36 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 219131-219567.

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Updated Working Draft of Motion Path Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog Jihye Hong • 21 July 2017

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of Motion Path Level 1.
Motion Path Level 1 describes how graphical object is positioned and animated along an author specified path.

Most of the changes are influenced by merging some features from CSS Round Display. A list of significant changes can be found in Changes section.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([motion-1] and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated Working Drafts of CSS Box Alignment and CSS Display Level 3

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 20 July 2017

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of CSS Box Alignment Level 3 and CSS Display Level 3. CSS Box Alignment Level 3 contains the features of CSS relating to the alignment of boxes within their containers in the various CSS box layout models (block, flexbox, grid, tables). CSS Display Level 3 describes how the CSS formatting box tree is generated from the document element tree and defines properties that control the types of boxes thus generated.

As we are wrapping up work on these specs in preparation for CR, most of the changes are fairly minor fixes and clarifications. A list of significant changes can be found in their respective Changes sections.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-align] or [css-display]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Minutes Telecon 2017-07-19

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 20 July 2017

Full Minutes

Updated Working Draft: CSS Display Level 3. Updated Working …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page20 July 2017

20 Jul 2017 Updated Working Draft: CSS Display Level 3. Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Alignment Level 3.

Minutes Telecon 2017-07-12

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 13 July 2017

Full Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 35

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 12 July 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 35 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 218629-219131.

Performance

Media

Web Inspector

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Accessibility

WebAssembly

WebCrypto

Web APIs

CSS

New Working Draft: CSS Fonts Level 4. Updated Working Draft:…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page11 July 2017

11 Jul 2017 New Working Draft: CSS Fonts Level 4. Updated Working Draft: Motion Path Level 1.

Minutes Telecon 2017-07-05

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 07 July 2017

Full Minutes

Video of the Week: CSS + SVG: A Designer’s Delight – Sara Soueidan

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 30 June 2017

Sara SoueidanWe’re going back to Respond 16 for our Video of the Week this week, when Sara Soueidan came to visit and delivered an inspiring, eye-opening keynote presentation on what can be done with CSS and SVG working together.

It’s an excellent talk, and really needs no more introduction than that.

 

 

Want more?

Like to see and read more like this? Be the first to score invitations to our events? Then jump on our once-a-week mailing list to keep up with everything happening at Web Directions. And you’ll get a complimentary digital copy of Scroll magazine.


The post Video of the Week: CSS + SVG: A Designer’s Delight – Sara Soueidan appeared first on Web Directions.

Minutes Telecon 2017-06-28

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 29 June 2017

Full Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 34

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 28 June 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 34 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 217978-218629.

WebRTC

Media

JavaScript

Security

Web Inspector

Web API

WebCrypto

WebAssembly

Rendering

Accessibility

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Minutes Telecon 2017-06-21

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 22 June 2017

Full Minutes

What’s new in Chromium 59 and Opera 46

Source: Dev.OperaSimon Pieters • 22 June 2017

Opera 46 (based on Chromium 59) for Mac, Windows, Linux is out! To find out what’s new for users, see our Desktop blog post. Here’s what it means for web developers.

Animated PNG

Opera now supports animated PNG, or APNG for short. APNG is a file format that works similarly to GIF. The difference is that APNG is smaller and supports both 24-bit images and 8-bit transparency. It has become quite popular recently, particularly since Apple adopted the APNG file format for the iOS 10 iMessage apps. APNG was also supported in Presto-based Opera 12.

Watch the APNG demo and learn more about this format.

SVG favicons

This was actually added in Opera 44, but we missed to write about it!

This might still be a bit rough in the edges, but in general SVG favicons should now work in Opera! (Not yet in Chromium.) To see this in action, check some of the WHATWG standards which use SVG favicons. Firefox also supports SVG favicons, and it was also supported in Presto-based Opera 12.

Expensive background tab throttling

Opera now throttles expensive background tabs. This reduces the processing power required for background tabs and improves battery life and browsing performance. Try it out yourself with this background timer throttling demo.

As a web developer, you also can help with reducing the work that your page or app does while being in a background tab by using requestAnimationFrame instead of timers to drive animations, and the Page Visibility API to stop unnecessary work when the page is hidden.

Service worker navigation preload

The Service Worker navigation preload API enables the browser to preload navigation requests while a service worker is starting up. See Speed up Service Worker with Navigation Preloads by Jake Archibald for more information.

Other features in this release

Deprecations and interoperability improvements

What’s next?

If you’re interested in experimenting with features that are in the pipeline for future versions of Opera, we recommend following our Opera Developer stream.

Code Leaders 17 Launch

Source: Web Directions BlogJohn • 16 June 2017

We can see that more and more engineers and developers are moving into positions where they are expected to have and develop managerial skills.

But managing teams of devs can involve unique circumstances and require specialised skills.

That’s why we invented Code Leaders.

Running in conjunction with our long standing, highly regarded Code Conference for front end engineers and JavaScript developers, Code Leaders focuses on what senior engineering decision makers need to know about right now.

As the things we build and the teams and organisations that build them become ever more complex, technical knowledge and capabilities simply aren’t enough. Code Leaders is designed for engineering and development leaders, senior developers, lead engineers, engineering managers, CTOs.

It doesn’t matter so much what your role is called, if you’re responsible for building and leading teams, and making strategic decisions about the technologies your company or organisations uses, Code Leaders is designed for you.

Code Leaders takes place over a single, intensive day, and features real world experts addressing key challenges of technology, leadership and developing, maintaining and growing great engineering teams.

There’s full information on the website, including registration and some great pricing options, but here’s a brief overview of what you can expect from Code Leaders.

Session 1: Technology

In this session, we’ll look at the current state, and near term developments of the core technologies of the web: JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SVG and the browser’s APIs, from two of the world’s leading experts.

JavaScript: Now and Next: Brian Terlson

Code Leaders - Brian Terlson

Where is JavaScript at right now, in 2017? And where is it headed in the near future? What changes will most impact the way you work in the coming years? How can you get involved in the process?

The State of Front End Technologies: Chris Lilley

Code Leaders - Chris Lilley

In our era of Web Apps, where JavaScript seems paramount, the core technologies of the web: HTML, CSS, SVG, and the browser’s DOM APIs still very much have a place when developing for the web. Chris Lilley gives us a sense of what’s coming for the foundations of the web platform.

Session 2: Best Practice

In this session, we’ll look at how networks impact performance, and security, and the architecture of Web Apps, again with two world leaders in these fields.

The Changing Face of Loading Resources: Andrew Betts

Code Leaders - Andrew Betts

The underlying transport mechanisms of the web, including HTTP and TCP are being overhauled. This session looks at the evolution of these largely out-of-sight but incredibly important protocols, with huge implications for performance and security for today’s web.

Modern Web App Architectures: Zero Cho

Code Leaders - Zero Cho

What is the architecture of complex Web Apps? Few apps work at the scale of Twitter, with hundreds of millions of users, and billions of messages a month. Hear about the architecture, and lessons learned building Twitter Lite.

Session 3: Culture

This session turns to the challenges that face senior engineering professionals and management: people, and ensuring the best from and for them. We draw on the experience of experts in building more diverse, inclusive, highly performing teams.

Re-imagining the Hiring Process: Elle Meredith & Lachlan Hardy

Code Leaders - Elle Meredith

We’ve all been on the other side of the table. A laundry list of required technologies and practices, white boarding code, logic puzzles, folks “hiring for culture fit”. But do these practices ensure the best possible hires, and ultimately the best performing teams?

Designing a Culture that Fosters Growth: Josh Duck

Code Leaders - Josh Duck

In this session Josh, now back in Australia managing a team at the ABC, shares lessons he learned working for Facebook, renowned for both its engineering prowess and also growing its engineering head count at an almost unimaginable rate over the last decade.

 

That’s quite a day.

Now, we’ve deliberately limited numbers for Code Leaders to ensure the greatest opportunity for participants to connect with one another, our leaders and invited experts. It’s a day for minimum screen time, and maximum connection and communication.

During the day you’ll be seated with a group of fellow participants with a balance of experience as leaders. Each table will have a facilitator, someone with significant industry experience, and will have the opportunity to put questions to our expert speakers.

Throughout the day there’ll be the opportunity for every participant to develop their leadership abilities by facilitating post-briefing discussion among your group.

You’ll also get the opportunity to connect with our leaders and invited experts during the day.

This is a new event, we’ve kept our prices low, and we do encourage you to register early. Given the number of tickets we’ve already sold, it is likely that this event will sell out.

If you’re in the business of leading or managing teams of engineers and developers – or you’d like to get to that kind of position – do not miss Code Leaders.

The post Code Leaders 17 Launch appeared first on Web Directions.

The 2017 edition of the CSS Day will take place on the 16th …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page16 June 2017

16 Jun 2017 The 2017 edition of the CSS Day will take place on the 16th of June (in Amsterdam). Speakers include Tab Atkins, Jen Simmons, Rachel Andrew, Håkon Wium Lie and Bert Bos.

Håkon Wium Lie will talk about ‘CSS in print’ and Bert Bos a…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page15 June 2017

15 Jun 2017 Håkon Wium Lie will talk about ‘CSS in print’ and Bert Bos about ‘CSS Grid’ at the CWI in Amsterdam on the 15th of June. Registration required.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 33

Source: Surfin' SafariJon Davis • 14 June 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 33 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 217407-217978.

Performance

JavaScript

WebRTC

Media Streams and Capture

Media

CSS Grid

Web API

Rendering

Web Inspector

Bug Fixes

Feeds

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