The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

Summit 17 – Lo, the Product & Design Track

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 15 September 2017

It’s time for Part Two of the Program Launch for Web Directions Summit 17: the Product & Design Track.

We are returning to our most popular conference format: two days, with two tracks – one focused on Engineering, the other on Product & Design, plus over-arching opening and closing keynotes on each day – a format to suit the whole team.

In this way, we are positioning Summit as a coming together of the different disciplines we practise, and as a peak event on your team’s professional development calendar.

We launched the Engineering Track program on Wednesday, and today we’re going to share with you the full program for the Product & Design Track of Summit 17.

Given this, we’re extending the Super Early Bird period by one week to Friday 22 September. And remember, if you register now to lock in the lowest possible pricing,  you  can pay later – even if that’s after the Early Bird closes.

Read on for an overview of the design track  or  Register now

 (don’t forget the special offer at the end of this email).

Product & Design Track, Day One

 Summit 17 - Chris Messina Lessons from the Death of the PC

Chris Messina

As the PC meets its slow demise, we stand on a precipice overlooking a broad shift in how technology is designed and serves people, with new hardware and embedded technologies that spell new paradigms for user experience, voice experience, and conversation experience.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Rob Manson The Landscape of (Extended) Reality

Rob Manson

For a technology that’s been over 55 years in the making, it’s taken a long time for VR to become an “overnight success”. What’s driving this buzz and how does VR relate to Augmented, Mixed, and Extended Reality?

 

 

 Summit 17 - Mark Dalgleish DesignOps: The Future of Design, as a Service

Mark Dalgleish

By focusing developers entirely on translating a company’s design language into production-ready code and monitoring its real-world effectiveness, teams can deliver high quality design across large organisations at a pace not previously possible.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Ben Birch & Tim Churchward Style Guides, So Hot Right Now

Ben Birch & Tim Churchward

A look at emerging tools and strategies that drive collaboration at the boundary of design and development, point out some pitfalls you might want to avoid, and help you evaluate the right approach for your team and organisation.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Nicola Rushton Retros, Research and Opinionated Design

Nicola Rushton

How do you create a culture of open communication, fast feedback and shared ownership? When it comes to normalising the sharing of feelings and helping a team own their process, structure is key.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Rona Shaanan Disruptive Design: The Designer as an Agent of Change

Rona Shaanan

You’re a designer, hired by an engineer-driven company that wants to get some of that umpteen per cent rise in productivity from being design driven. You are the agent of change. Now what?

 

 Summit 17 - Dan Rubin A Life on the Web

Dan Rubin

Dan has lived a life curiously suited to the web, one that has eschewed the traditional linear career structure and more closely resembles the inter-connected, graph-like nature of the web itself. Find out what he’s learned along the way.

 

So that’s Day One – although there’s actually one more speaker to lock in. Even then, we’re deep-diving into some major key topics already. Let’s see what’s on Day Two.

Product & Design Track, Day Two

 

 Summit 17 - Genevieve Bell Artificial Intelligence: Making a Human Connection

Genevieve Bell

It’s tempting to keep separate the art and science of the robot and the artificial intelligence that underpins it. However, there are reasons to thread them back together and understand how the story of AI is connected to the history of human culture.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Richard Rutter 13 Golden Rules of Typography on the Web

Richard Rutter

Typography is what comes between the author and the reader. If you design websites or use CSS then you are a typographer. The guidelines in this talk combine implement­ation details with typographic theory, to set you on the road to designing beautiful and effective responsive typography.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Lauren Lucchese Designing Conversations

Lauren Lucchese

How do we design for conversational UIs, when the content is the experience, and words are the interface? Can we design contextually relevant conversations for bots that evoke emotion and lead to relationships rooted in trust, empathy, and understanding?

 

 

 Summit 17 - Simon Wright Designing Better Coffee

Simon Wright

How the idea for, and design of, a new brand of ethical coffee came to be, and how the design was informed by the business and ethical goals, while these, too, were in turn shaped by the design decisions.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Sarah Pulis Designing for Extremes

Sarah Pulis

Designing for the “average user” doesn’t mean  you are designing for everyone. It means you’re designing for no-one. There is no average user. But what happens if instead you deliberately design for the extremes, for each individual?

 

 

 Summit 17 - Kazjon Grace Personalised Curiosity: Why and how machine learning can keep your users surprised and engaged

Kazjon Grace

How an AI model of curiosity inspired by cognitive science can be used to encourage us to broaden our tastes.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Oliver Weidlich On Mobile, Context is King

Oliver Weidlich

Most mobile service designs take no notice of what the device knows, or previous interactions, and assume each ‘channel’ is a new unconnected experience. But in a mobile-connected world, we can design richer and more contextual experiences.

 

 Summit 17 - Amélie Lamont Don’t Kill Them Softly: Fostering a Culture of Fearless Feedback

Amélie Lamont

Like opinions, harmful or useless feedback can kill your team by demoralisation. Design Anthropology can inform a framework that fosters a fearless feedback culture focusing on creating value, rather than pointing out flaws.

 

So, like the Engineering Track, we’ve curated a seriously substantial program of Product & Design presentations, each focused on a key topic or issue facing designers now and into the immediate future.

Now, you should be aware that tickets are already selling fast (just as they did in Melbourne for Code, when we sold out before Early Bird even closed). In fact, as you’ll see below, for Summit we’ve already sold out of Gold tickets.

Pricing

Register during the Primary Early Bird period up to and including Friday 22 September and get $200 off the regular cost.

NB Don’t forget the option of a Three Day Pass to Summit plus our new Culture or Reality conferences – outstanding value!

You’ll find much more info about the speakers and their presentations on the Summit 17 website.

Curating a two-track conference is a bit like putting together two conferences at once, and there’s an inevitable concern to make each track as potent as the other. With this conference, I think we’ve really achieved something special with both tracks.

If your work focuses on Product & Design, I think you’ll find Summit 17 to be just what you need.

See you there.

The post Summit 17 – Lo, the Product & Design Track appeared first on Web Directions.

Minutes Telecon 2017-09-13

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 13 September 2017

Full Minutes

Summit 17 – Behold, the Engineering Track

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 13 September 2017

Web Directions is back!

We’ve taken our annual Sydney end-of-year conference back to the structure that’s best known and loved: two huge days, with two big tracks – one focused on Engineering, the other on Products and Design, plus stellar over-arching opening and closing keynotes on each day from high profile industry leaders;  a format to suit your whole team, across disciplines.

At the same time, we move forward. We renamed the conference Summit to distinguish it from other Web Directions events, and to characterise it as both a coming together of the different disciplines we practise, and a peak of our professional development year.

If there’s just a single web / tech / digital conference you go to each year, we want it to be Web Directions Summit.

We’ve so far announced eight Summit speakers, all important figures of international stature. We still have a detail or two to finalise in the Product / Design Track, but we can’t stand to wait any longer, so today we’re going to share with you the full program for the Engineering Track of Summit 17.

We’ll launch the other track next week, and because of that, we’re going to extend the Super Early Bird period by one week to Friday 22 September (the best ticket deals), and the second Early Bird to Friday 20 October (still good deals there).

When you have a line-up this good, you can’t keep it to yourself!

And remember, you can register now to get your Super Early Bird discount, and pay later – even if that’s after the Early Bird closes.

Engineering Track, Day One

 Summit 17 - Chris Messina Lessons from the Death of the PC

Chris Messina

As the PC meets its slow demise, we stand on a precipice overlooking a broad shift in how technology is designed and serves people, with new hardware and embedded technologies that spell new paradigms for user experience, voice experience, and conversation experience.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Iker Jamardo WebXR: Virtual and Augmented Reality on the Web

Iker Jamardo

A deep dive into the current state of the Virtual and Augmented Reality technologies on the web, with the most outstanding examples of VR/AR websites to date, cutting edge browser prototypes and an update on standards progress.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Chris Eppstein Some Thoughts on CSS Architectures, Frameworks and Tooling

Chris Eppstein

Insights and thoughts about how and why styling components led us to CSS-in-JS (and, inevitably, JS-in-CSS) and how tooling can bridge the divide between what’s best for the developer and what’s best for the browser

 

 

 Summit 17 - Kyle Simpson Keep Betting on JavaScript

Kyle Simpson

JavaScript is no longer trying to prove itself. It has arrived, it’s now fully a first class citizen in the programming language ecosystem. So what’s over the horizon for the world’s most ubiquitous and popular (by usage, if not emotion!) language?

 

 

 Mehdi Valikhani Meta Programming in JavaScript

Mehdi Valikhani

Meta whaaat?! Meta programming is a way to customise built-in features of a programming language. Say we have an array of multiple Beer objects, each of them has a field called ‘name’. What if I tell you that you could fetch VB’s data using ‘beers[‘VB’]’!

 

 

 Summit 17 - Erwin van der Koogh Back-end Development for Front-end Developers

Erwin van der Koogh

With the release of AWS Lambda and similar “serverless” computing services, anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of JavaScript can write reliable and scalable back-ends. And front-end developers actually have a big advantage.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Josh Duck Exploring Static Types: Writing Typesafe Code that Feels Like Real JavaScript

Josh Duck

Flow and TypeScript are changing the foundations of JavaScript. Far from turning code into an object oriented mess, static typing gives us JS code that’s cleaner and more predictable. With typechecking, we end up with easier interfaces for humans, too.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Dan Rubin A Life on the Web

Dan Rubin

Dan has lived a life curiously suited to the web, one that has eschewed the traditional linear career structure and more closely resembles the inter-connected, graph-like nature of the web itself. Find out what he’s learned along the way.

I think you’ll agree that is a pretty substantial Day One: five internationals and three locals, big picture and deep dive, a few perspectives on JS, some “now” and some “coming soon”.

Let’s see what Day Two holds.

Engineering Track, Day Two

 

 Summit 17 - Genevieve Bell Artificial Intelligence: Making a Human Connection

Genevieve Bell

It’s tempting to keep separate the art and science of the robot and the artificial intelligence that underpins it. However, there are reasons to thread them back together and understand how the story of AI is connected to the history of human culture.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Amir Shevat Moving from Web & Mobile to Messaging – To Bot or Not to Bot

Amir Shevat

We’re seeing a big move from web and mobile apps to conversational interfaces. The future of work doesn’t include endless email chains, 30 open browser tabs, or siloed tools. Find out instead what bots and delightful UI can do for you.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Jessica Edwards Workers of the Web Unite

Jessica Edwards

With increasing browser support for Service Workers, developers can now create websites that work offline, independent of network status, and with great flexibility. By understanding the Web Worker API, we can better understand Service Workers and how to use them.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Tammy Everts Performance is About People, Not Metrics

Tammy Everts

A brief history of UX and web performance research, highlighting key studies that connect the dots between performance and user experience, with some educated guesses about new metrics just around the corner. Some day we’ll laugh at how little we actually knew.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Hannah Malcolm Delivering a Web Experience in 10KB

Hannah Malcolm

Can you deliver a compelling web experience in less than 10KB, without the need for JavaScript? Learn about the challenges and breakthroughs in designing and building the Best Design winner of the 2016 A List Apart competition.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Phil Nash 2FA, WTF?

Phil Nash

Everyone is hacking everything. Everything is vulnerable. Your site, your users, even you. Are you worried about security? You should be! Let’s look at one time passwords, implementing 2FA in web applications and the only real life compelling use case for QR codes.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Elle Meredith The Latest in Browser Developer Tools

Elle Meredith

The capability of tools like Firebug in our modern browsers has grown extraordinarily, but keeping up with them is hard work. Get up to speed with some of the more overlooked ways in which we can improve performance, code quality and more.

 

 

 Summit 17 - Amélie Lamont Don’t Kill Them Softly: Fostering a Culture of Fearless Feedback

Amélie Lamont

Like opinions, harmful or useless feedback can kill your team by demoralisation. Design Anthropology can inform a framework that fosters a fearless feedback culture focusing on creating value, rather than pointing out flaws.

All up: nine international speakers, seven locals, four broad theme keynotes, and 12 tightly focused presentations on many of the fundamentally key topics and issues with which engineers are engaging, now and into the immediate future.

And this is just the one track!

Now, you should be aware that tickets are already selling fast (just as they did in Melbourne for Code, when we sold out before Early Bird even closed). In fact, as you’ll see below, for Summit we’ve already sold out of Gold tickets.

Register during the Primary Early Bird period up to and including Friday 22 September and get $200 off the regular cost.

NB Take a look at the add-on deals available by registering for a Three Day Pass to Culture or Reality conferences the day before Summit – outstanding value!

You’ll find much more info about the speakers and their presentations on the Summit 17 website.

As someone who’s been in the business for over a decade now, I can assure you that this is one of the strongest programs for a conference engineering track I have ever been privileged to curate. I’m very proud of it, and I know you’ll love it.

See you there.

The post Summit 17 – Behold, the Engineering Track appeared first on Web Directions.

Minutes Telecon 2017-09-06

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 07 September 2017

Full Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 37

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 06 September 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 37 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 219567-220128.

Web API

JavaScript

WebAssembly

Apple Pay

CSS

Web Inspector

WebDriver

Rendering

Accessibility

Media

Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Alignment Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page06 September 2017

6 Sep 2017 Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Alignment Level 3.

New Candidate Recommendation: Media Queries Level 4.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page05 September 2017

5 Sep 2017 New Candidate Recommendation: Media Queries Level 4.

Minutes Paris F2F 2017-08-03 Part II: Fonts, Display, Counter Styles

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 02 September 2017

Fonts 3

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CSS Fonts 4

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CSS Display Level 3

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Minutes Paris F2F 2017-08-03 Part I: Tables, Automating Test Coverage, CSS UI, F2F Scheduling

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 02 September 2017

Tables

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CSS UI 3

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The Law of Least Power and Defunct StackOverflow Answers

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 02 September 2017

Sadly, I don’t get the chance to work with JavaScript extensively day to day much anymore, but from time to time I do get the chance to explore a new idea and build something hopefully useful and interesting.

In an age of single page app architectures, it’s surprising what new, novel and interesting things you can build with a relatively small amount of plain old JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and little else. As terribly out of fashion as that might sound.

But one downside of not working with the technologies every day is you forget … well, just about everything. Exploring something at the weekend, I loaded a video element and there were no controls – before recalling dimly you need to set a boolean attribute controls for a video element to display controls.

But that’s not really the point of this piece.

So, where do you go when you can’t remember simple things like “How can I be sure that this element is currently visible in the user’s window”?

The internet!

Which leads directly to the fountain of all programming wisdom, Stack Overflow.

Yes, the parody is essentially real.

parody book cover of O'Reilly book titled Copying and Pasting from Stack Overflow

But answer after answer to this and similar questions about basic DOM APIs and common patterns lead to the response “well, in jQuery you …”. And of course the questions end up being closed off at some point by moderators.

The thing is, a few years ago, jQuery was such a ubiquitous part of a developer’s toolkit that this seemed a perfectly reasonable approach. Who didn’t use jQuery?

And since it smoothed off so many bumpy surfaces in terms of browser differences, answers using jQuery could be more succinct and more immediately practically useful. A plain old vanilla JavaScript and DOM API answer might have required a bunch of additional code for edge cases, different browsers, and so on.

But now? jQuery is a far less central technology, as much as it’s still widely used. Its core value propositions, smoothing over the pain of browser inconsistencies, and providing higher order functionality, have largely gone away (browsers have become more consistent, the DOM API now supports features ‘inspired’ by jQuery like classList and querySelector).

And so, for all but those using jQuery in ongoing application development, these answers (which due to StackOverflow’s high pagerank dominate search results for related topics) are doubly useless. They are no longer cut and paste code that “just works”, nor do they help us understand the underlying APIs and their workings.

This speaks to an important software engineering principle (software engineering is a practice we on the web have frankly paid too little attention to, as I’ve been on the record arguing for many years): The Law (or rule, or principle) of least power. It’s been formulated by Tim Berners-Lee, no less (so, you know, any of us who work on the web should perhaps pay at least a little attention to his thoughts, since he invented this whole damned thing), as “choosing the least powerful [computer] language suitable for a given purpose”.

Which, to many, may sound backwards. But it is at work here in jQuery based stack overflow answers.

How does this work in the case of StackOverflow answers? If we choose the underlying DOM APIs, and then the simplest, plainest JavaScript to access them, this solution is essentially immortal. It will always work. People with foundation knowledge of web technologies will in decades hence understand. People who work with jQuery will understand. Angular, CoffeeScript, TypeScript, even React users (calm down) will understand. Because they all understand JavaScript, right? Right?

Instead, we now have effectively useless answers, crowding out potentially good ones.

To draw a slightly longer bow, the same principle applies to deeper architectural decisions. Right now, I see literally a mania for React. We’ve seen it (with less fervour) for many other DOM and CSS frameworks, tools and libraries, for variants on and supersets of JavaScript.

jQuery, once utterly dominant, is increasingly a legacy technology. How many grid frameworks had their moment in the sun? Bootstrap, Angular, CoffeeScript, all had moments where they seemed to define best practice.

Now even simple websites, the sort we used to build with tables and spacer gifs, then CSS, are now built with React.

The ads that used to look for jQuery developers now look for React developers.

We’ve been here before.

I don’t know. Perhaps we have reached the perfect (or at least good enough) architecture and toolset for building web stuff. But when a pattern keeps emerging time after time, I think it makes sense to consider whether there’s something fundamental to that pattern. So what is that pattern?

On the web we seem to have cycles that look like this: we start with something really simple, like the original HTML. No styling, no images even, just a few page elements (headings, paragraphs, a few inline styles) and links.

Over time, features are added (for example, tables and images) and we uncover patterns that allow us to transcend what the platform imagined – hacking tables and gifs to create Killer Layouts (look it up). These patterns become increasingly complex and arcane, and require ever more specialisation.

And then something newer and simpler arrives (for example, CSS in the mid 90s), that seems initially too trivial to allow us to do anything meaningful, too limited, that makes it too hard to do what we were doing easily before (“easily”, because we’d built a body of practices and patterns and technologies over a period of years).

A perfect example is Image Replacement (IR) Techniques. For the uninitiated, before web fonts and the likes of Typekit (you can thank me later for all this – No, seriously) we developed (well, I say “we”, but I always thought they were a terrible idea) techniques that would allow us to render text as an image, then display this on a page, while maintaining accessibility by displaying the actual text of the element in a way that screen readers (and search engines) could read, but hid the text itself from sighted viewers.

Just explaining what they did is exhausting and frustrating. But they did allow you to “display” fonts that weren’t on the user’s computer.

And then web fonts came along. And, in a stroke, IR techniques were redundant.

Of course, we now have a set of challenges around loading web fonts, and do we have the Flash of Unstyled Content, or Flash of No Content?

You see how it goes?

This has played out over and over on the web (and beyond, but more of that another day). A kind of Groundhog Day, where each recurring day is also a different one.

But.

Underneath all of these patterns and practices and frameworks and libraries are core technologies. And underlying principles.

Some that pertain specifically to the web, some that predate the web (as I mentioned, that significantly overlooked field of software engineering).

These are foundations – technological, and of practice – that we ignore, overlook, or flaunt at our peril.

And a simple example of the consequences is that all those StackOverflow answers are now worse than useless.

 

The post The Law of Least Power and Defunct StackOverflow Answers appeared first on Web Directions.

Minutes Paris F2F 2017-08-02 Part II: Flexbox, Selectors, focus-ring, Inert

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 27 August 2017

Flexbox

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focus-ring

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Minutes Paris F2F 2017-08-02 Part III: Motion Path, Sizing, Step Function Parameter Names, Intrinsic Sizing of No Intrinsic Size Images

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 27 August 2017

Motion Path

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Minutes Paris F2F 2017-08-02 Part I: Grid, CSS Counter Styles, Media Queries 4, Additive CSS, CSS Alignment

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 27 August 2017

Grid

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Media Queries 4

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Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page24 August 2017

24 Aug 2017 Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1.

Minutes Telecon 2017-08-23

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 23 August 2017

Full Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 38

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 22 August 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 38 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 220128-220795.

Beacon API

Fetch API

Web Payments

CSS

Web API

Media

Apple Pay

Web Inspector

WebDriver

Updated Working Draft: CSS Text Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page22 August 2017

22 Aug 2017 Updated Working Draft: CSS Text Level 3.

Program for W3C Publishing Summit Announced

Source: W3C Blog Bill McCoy • 17 August 2017

openweb quote illustration The program for the inaugural W3C Publishing Summit (taking place November 9-10, 2017 in the San Francisco Bay Area) has just been announced. The program will feature keynotes from Internet pioneer and futurist Tim O’Reilly and Adobe CTO Abhay Parasnis. along with dozens of other speakers and panelists who will showcase and discuss how web technologies are shaping publishing today, tomorrow, and beyond.

Publishing and the web interact in innumerable ways. From schools to libraries, from design to production to archiving, from metadata to analytics, from New York to Paris to Buenos Aires to Tokyo, the Summit will show how web technologies are making publishing more accessible, more global, and more efficient and effective. Mozilla user experience lead and author Jen Simmons will showcase the ongoing revolution in CSS. Design experts Laura Brady, Iris Febres and Nellie McKesson will cover putting the reader first when producing ebooks and automating publishing workflows. We’ll also hear from reading system creator Micah Bowers (Bluefire) and EPUB pioneers George Kerscher (DAISY) and Garth Conboy (Google).

The newly-unveiled program will also showcase insights from senior leaders from across the spectrum of publishing and digital content stakeholders including Jeff Jaffe (CEO, W3C), Yasushi Fujita (CEO, Media DO), Rick Johnson (SVP Product and Strategy, Ingram/VitalSource), Ken Brooks (COO, Macmillan Learning), Liisa McCloy-Kelley (VP, Penguin Random House), and representatives from Rakuten Kobo, NYPL, University of Michigan Library/Publishing, Wiley, Hachette Book Group, Editis, EDRLab, and more.

I’m very excited about this new event which represents an important next milestone in the expanded Publishing@W3C initiative and I hope you will join us. Register now. For more information on the event, see the W3C Publishing Summit 2017 homepage and Media Advisory.

Sponsors of the W3C Publishing Summit include Ingram/VitalSource, SPi Global, and Apex. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available, email me at bmccoy@w3.org for more information. The Publishing Summit is one of several co-located events taking place during W3C’s major annual gathering, TPAC, for which registration is open for W3C members.

Minutes Telecon 2017-08-16

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 17 August 2017

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Code 17 in 100 Tweets

Source: Web Directions BlogRicky Onsman • 15 August 2017

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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Dev Diner chatbot
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: ordering coffee
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: trending fourth
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Damon Oehlman
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Ben Teese
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: a diverse audience
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: coffee ordering system is built in Preact
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: size isn't all that matters in performance
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley web font tips
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: The browser is not a policeman
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Chris Lilley sketch
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: sketch notes
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: PWA Taiwan
Code 17: trending second
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: speaker dinner
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Day 2 Yarra
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Day 2 begins
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: coffee merging and publishing
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mandy Michael nervous
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: page loading Andrew Betts
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: webpage size performance
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: packet communication as a chat log
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: OSI at a Front End conference
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Andrew Betts summary
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: CSS discussion
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mark Dalgleish
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Nicole Sullivan shoutout
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Glen Maddern styled components
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: it's the foundations you build on
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Mandy Michael on style guides
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Code 17 in 100 Tweets: CSS is not easy
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: the future of AI is scary and exciting
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick likes sketchnote
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick tweets live
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Patrick thanks Web Directions
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Aimree Maree accessibility
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: accessibility and javascript
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: javascript accessibility
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Charlotte Jackson
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: caniuse @supports
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: feature queries
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Marcos Caceres form autocomplete
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Marcos Caceres Payment API
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head world of animation
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head fun and energy
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head comparing JS frameworks
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: Val Head on web animation
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: service workers
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: the many different ways people use the web
Code 17 in 100 Tweets
Code 17 in 100 Tweets: conference close

The post Code 17 in 100 Tweets appeared first on Web Directions.

What’s new in Chromium 60 and Opera 47

Source: Dev.OperaFredrik Söderqvist • 15 August 2017

Opera 47 (based on Chromium 60) for Mac, Windows, Linux is out! To find out what’s new for users, see our Desktop blog post. Here’s what it means for web developers.

Paint Timing API

While no generalized metric perfectly captures when a page is loaded in all cases, First Paint and First Contentful Paint are invaluable numbers to measure critical user moments during loading. To give developers better insight into their site’s loading performance, the new Paint Timing API exposes metrics that capture First Paint and First Contentful Paint.

CSS font-display

Downloadable web fonts are often used to create more visually rich web experiences. Historically, Opera has delayed rendering text until the specified font is available, to ensure visual correctness. However, downloading a font can take as long as several seconds on a poor connection, significantly delaying the time until a user sees content. Opera now supports the CSS font-display property as part of an @font-face descriptor, allowing developers to specify how and when Opera displays text content while downloading fonts.

Credential Management API improvements

Starting in Opera 47, PasswordCredential also contains the user’s password, alleviating the need for a custom fetch() to access a stored password.

Some changes has also been made to to better align with the work being done in the Web Authentication Working Group. This includes the deprecation of requireUserMediation, which has been renamed to preventSilentAccess.

Other features in this release

Deprecations and interoperability improvements

What’s next?

If you’re interested in experimenting with features that are in the pipeline for future versions of Opera, we recommend following our Opera Developer stream.

CR of CSS Containment Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog Florian Rivoal • 08 August 2017

The CSS WG has published a Candidate Recommendation and invites implementations of the CSS Containment Module Level 1.

This CSS module describes the contain property, which indicates that the element’s subtree is independent of the rest of the page. This enables heavy optimizations by user agents when used well.

This is the first CR of this drafts. Implementations are encouraged, and feedback based on them much welcome. In particular, comments about interaction with other specifications would be very welcome, and you find desirable optimization opportunities that this technology fails to facilitate, the CSSWG would like to hear from you.

Significant changes are listed in the change section of the specification, and a disposition of comments is available.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-contain]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

First Public Working Draft of CSS Fonts Level 4

Source: CSS WG Blog Myles Maxfield • 08 August 2017

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of CSS Fonts Level 4. This module defines new features regarding variable fonts, font loading timeline configuration, and color fonts support.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-fonts]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page08 August 2017

8 Aug 2017 New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Containment Level 1.

You can now follow the CSS Working Group's discussions via M…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page04 August 2017

4 Aug 2017 You can now follow the CSS Working Group's discussions via Mastodon, in addition to Twitter, the blog and the blog's Atom feed.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Typed OM Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page01 August 2017

1 Aug 2017 Updated Working Draft: CSS Typed OM Level 1.

Minutes Telecon 2017-07-26

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 27 July 2017

Full Minutes

Adobe Announces Flash Distribution and Updates to End

Source: Surfin' Safari Apple's WebKit Team • 25 July 2017

Adobe has announced it will stop distributing and updating Flash Player at the end of 2020 and is encouraging web developers to migrate any existing Flash content to open standards. Apple is working with Adobe, industry partners, and developers to complete this transition.

Apple users have been experiencing the web without Flash for some time. iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch never supported Flash. For the Mac, the transition from Flash began in 2010 when Flash was no longer pre-installed. Today, if users install Flash, it remains off by default. Safari requires explicit approval on each website before running the Flash plugin.

To display rich interactive content in the browser, WebKit—the engine that powers Safari—supports the latest standards, including the following:

The WebKit Project is excited about the future of the open web. We invite you to follow this blog to learn about new technologies as they’re implemented in WebKit.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 36

Source: Surfin' Safari Jon Davis • 21 July 2017

Safari Technology Preview Release 36 is now available for download for macOS Sierra and betas of macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab. This release covers WebKit revisions 219131-219567.

JavaScript

CSS

WebRTC

Web Driver

Rendering

Media

Web Inspector

WebAssembly

Bug Fixes

Updated Working Draft of Motion Path Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog Jihye Hong • 21 July 2017

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of Motion Path Level 1.
Motion Path Level 1 describes how graphical object is positioned and animated along an author specified path.

Most of the changes are influenced by merging some features from CSS Round Display. A list of significant changes can be found in Changes section.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([motion-1] and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

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