The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

Updated Working Drafts of CSS Text Level 3 and CSS Text Level 4

Source: CSS WG Blog fantasai • 20 September 2018

The CSS Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of CSS Text Level 3 and CSS Text Level 4. This module contains various typesetting properties not related to font selection, such as alignment, line breaking, white space collapsing, text justification, and other forms of text-level spacing adjustments.

CSS Text Level 3 is a fairly late-stage Working Draft. This update fixes a number of issues not addressed in and/or raised after the 22 August 2017 publication last year. The Disposition of Comments tracking issues raised and fixed since the 2013 Last Call Working Draft has been updated.

CSS Text Level 4 is still an early-stage exploratory Working Draft, currently maintained as a diff spec against Level 3. This update fixes some issues in the previous WD and adds the line-padding, text-group-align, and text-spacing: space-first features. The Changes section summarizes all changes since the First Public Working Draft.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-text]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Minutes Telecon 2018-09-19

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 20 September 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Design at Web Directions Summit ’18

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 20 September 2018

At our earliest events, the design aspects of our programs were very much focussed on Web design.

But over the last decade or so, just as professionals have increasingly specialised, and design in the broad sense has become central to what we build, so too has the focus on design shifted at Web Directions.

What was once called Web Design, became Front End Design–with its focus on CSS in particular–is now largely part of Front End development. If that is what you do, in our engineering track you’ll find a good deal of focus on these aspects of designing and building for the Web. There are amazing new layout and typographical capabilities now widely supported, that we’re covering there.

The design track has evolved to focus on aspects of design such as interaction and UX design, design research, typography and even illustration. But as it says in our name, (the Directions bit), our aim is always to look to where we are headed next. As we’ve done for many years, we’ll provide insights into the topics and techniques we feel should be on your radar, and starting to incorporate into your practice today.

We also pay attention to the broader practice of design, and the way design integrates into business and strategy, and a topic now central to everything we do: ethics.

Some of the particular highlights for this year’s Summit with a design focus include

Oliver Reichenstein, one of the most influential experts in the field of Information Architecture, and founder of IAWriter, the hugely popular writing app, will consider deeply the connection between design, philosophy and ethics.

Yiying Lu will be familiar to many. She grew up in Shanghai, came to Australia to study design, and now works with companies from early stage startups to the scale of Disney. As our world becomes increasingly cross-cultural, Yiying will shed light on how design can help cross cultures in a digital world, a challenge particularly vital to Australia.

Mara Giudice is a legend in the world of design. With high level roles in product design at Facebook and AutoDesk where she was VP of Design in her resume, and books like the the highly influential ‘The Rise of the DEO’, about Leaders who understand the transformative power of design and embrace its traits and tenets, Maria has been instrumental in the transition of design from marginal to central in strategic decision making.

Joe Toscano: our models for interacting with machines are changing rapidly, toward a conversational, chat based approach. The past few years have been filled with chatbot experiments—some brilliant, many not—but the future has yet to be experienced. As artificial intelligence capabilities advance, conversation will become the next major interaction model, not just a messenger experience.
Joe Toscano, an award winning Experience Designer at the likes of Google, and now founder of the not for profit Design Good, will explain why conversation will play such a large role in the future, define how it will happen, and suggest how you can integrate conversation into your product roadmap.

Caroline Sinders: Hugely popular when she spoke at Directions 2016 on the fateful morning of Donald Trump’s election, Caroline has a long career in thinking deeply about the impact of technology on the individual, society and culture. With stints in design research at IBM Watson, BuzzFeed, and the Wikimedia Foundation, Caroline will ask: Instead of building future worlds imagined in the ’60s during the Space Race, what is the future now, and how can we build it?

Cyd Harrell was until recently Chief of Staff at F8, an agency embedded in the US Digital Service (similar to Australia’s DTA). With extensive experience in design leadership and research in the private and public sector, Cyd will consider how to use your metaphorical capacity to do great qualitative analysis. She’ll dig into how to source apt metaphors from users and from your team, how to use them as pointers into the salient parts of a mountain of qualitative data

But this barely scratches the surface of what is on offer. Jennifer Hom, and illustrator and Experience Design Manager at Airbnb will showcase the development process of Airbnb’s illustrative aesthetics. Tim Buesing will demonstrate how transparency creates trust and brings success to products, services and brands. Allison Ravenhall will show us what the latest Accessibility standards mean for designers.

And that’s not even the entire design focussed program. Take a look at the full schedule now, then register your place for this once-a-year event. There are extra special pricing for freelancers and not for profits, and great team offers as well.

The post Design at Web Directions Summit ’18 appeared first on Web Directions.

New Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3. Updated Working Draft…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page20 September 2018

20 Sep 2018 New Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3. Updated Working Draft: CSS Text Level 3. Updated Working Draft: CSS Text Level 4.

Engineering at Web Directions Summit ’18

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 13 September 2018

From the very beginning, our events have had a strong focus on development. With our background in developing (both for the Web and of tools for other web developers) it’s something we’ve always thought a lot about, and continue to focus on.

As the event matured, and as the roles of development and design separated out, we added a second track, focussed on design, and that dual focus on engineering and design at Web Directions Summit continues today.

But we quite deliberately call this our engineering track (rather than our developer, or development track), since we want to reflect the breadth of what we cover there.

This track is about core technologies–CSS and JavaScript, and working with them. But it’s importantly about the practices, patterns and approaches critical to building successful modern front ends.

Core technologies

Our goal when we focus on specific technologies is to help our attendees get a sense of the things we feel they should be starting to concentrate on–avoiding hype and short term trends, and honing in on things that will become fundamental to how we build for the Web.

This year, there’s a strong focus on:

GraphQL: The longstanding RESTful approach to architecting web applications is in many places starting to give way to GraphQL. Peggy Ryazis, from Meteor, will explore some of the use-cases and success stories of top companies as they’ve made the move to GraphQL. She’ll also offer guidance as to how to move through the phases of adoption at your company.

WebAssembly: JavaScript engines in modern browsers have become increasingly powerful and for some time now, developers have been targeting a subset of the JavaScript language that brings particular performance benefits. This is now standardised as WebAssembly, and supported in all modern browsers. It’s not simply for porting old codebases to the web either, but can be used in many interesting ways, as Alex Danilo from Google will cover.

CSS Layout: A revolution in web layout is happening, driven by the widespread support of CSS Grid and Flexbox. We’re privileged to have perhaps the world expert in these technologies, Rachel Andrew here to talk about them.

Variable Fonts: Not only is layout undergoing a revolution on the Web so too is typography, with Variable fonts, a technology also now widely supported in modern browsers. With significant performance as well as design benefits, it’s a technology everyone should have on their radar. Mandy Michael will be here to get you up to speed on this exciting technology.

There’s much more besides, including deep dives into the Virtual DOM and the CSS Box model.

Patterns and Practices

As I mentioned, we don’t just highlight technologies, but also patterns and practices essential for building modern front ends, including performance, security, debugging and quality assurance techniques and more.

Performance: One of the world experts on web application performance, Patrick Hamman, will look at HTTP/2 Server push, and its benefits (and potential challenges).

Security: Erwin van der Koogh will look at recent additions to the browser security stack and how you can massively increase the security of your site with relatively little work.

Scaling: with more than 80 apps, 150 developers in 4 different countries and more than 700k LOC. Atlassian has had to learn about scale. Nadia Makarevich will cover the strategies and tools that Atlassian has developed to create and support a high-velocity, high-quality engineering environment, challenges and obstacles that they had to overcome and hoops that they jumped through on the way.

We’ll also cover modern debugging and quality assurance techniques, look at the current state of the art in development including typed JavaScript, and more.

It’s a huge program, with value for your whole engineering team, from Junior developer to CTO. And speaking of teams, we have great offers for teams, including videos from other recent Web Directions events like Code earlier this year, plus more.

The post Engineering at Web Directions Summit ’18 appeared first on Web Directions.

Minutes Telecon 2018-09-12

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 13 September 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

New Superseded Recommendation: CSS Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page13 September 2018

13 Sep 2018 New Superseded Recommendation: CSS Level 1.

W3C Developer meetup in Lyon, October 22

Source: W3C Blog Marie-Claire Forgue • 12 September 2018

logo of W3C devmeetup in LyonMark your calendar and register now for another amazing W3C developer meetup! This free event is scheduled on Monday October 22 (from 6:30pm to 10:30pm) on the premises of Université de Lyon, in the 7th district of downtown Lyon (France), near square Jean Macé.

We’re particularly excited to be back in Lyon to meet and discuss again with Web designers and application developers from Lyon and Greater Lyon.

logo of University of LyonWe are taking advantage of the presence of world renowned experts to build a great evening of demonstrations, presentations and discussions. With special thanks to Université de Lyon, W3C Member, for hosting the event!

A partnership between W3C and La Cuisine du Web

In addition to our strong relationship with Université de Lyon, we are really happy to partner with La Cuisine du Web (Lyon’s Webdevs cluster) since their annual Blend Web Mix conference is happening the same week. As a recognition of this partnership, our W3C developer meetup is part of BlendWebMix OFF.

The W3C international community is in Lyon for a week to attend the annual W3C TPAC (Technical Plenary /  Advisory Committee) event. Over 550 people are gathering to coordinate the development and adoption of Web standards in W3C’s working groups, community groups, the Advisory Board, the Technical Architecture Group, etc.

One of the major values we hear from participants of our developer meetup as part of the TPAC week is around the opportunities for developers and standardistas to mingle and exchange on the current status and the future the Web platform. So, what’s planned for this year’s W3C developer meetup?

Everyone loves demos!

Doors opens at 6pm, and the show starts at 6:30 with cool demonstrations of Web technologies in action – a combination of technologies already in deployment as well as technologies still under exploration and prototyping. This is a unique opportunity to discover technologies you may not have heard of, and discuss with their designers and implementors on use cases to which they’re applicable and how to get them deployed in real conditions.

Confirmed demos so far include: Immersive Web (AR/VR), Machine learning for the Web (WebML), MapML and Web of Things. We are expecting about ten demonstrations total. Follow us on our @w3cdevs twitter account where to find teasers about these demos between now and the event.

Some of the demos will be available again after the talks over drinks and snacks, from 9 to 10:30pm.

A great line-up of speakers

Collage of Lyon's devmeetup speakers

From 7:30pm until 8:45pm, we will listen to a series of five talks given by experts on CSS, privacy, internationalization, and Web documentation.

Register now!

Participation in the meetup is open to everyone at no cost – so please register and reserve your seat asap because space is limited.

Thanks to our sponsors!

This event would not have been possible without the support from our sponsors Qwant, Microsoft, Mozilla, NTT Communications, StickerMule and WithYou. Many thanks to them!

Collage of Lyon's devmeetup sponsors logos

Sponsorship opportunities are still available for companies who want to showcase their commitment to the Web Platform to an expected crowd of 350+ attendees.

Iterating on the Web

Source: Web Directions BlogJohn • 11 September 2018

Every few months or so a tweet or blog post in the web development world seems to ignite a heated conversation about CSS, CSS in JS, the future of Web development, whether certain folks are out of touch, and if so how. A bit of side eye and snark. Here’s something I wrote about this topic during a now long forgotten outbreak back in 2013!

The most recent such ‘conversation’ was triggered by this tweet:

Only 43% of the 13,000 people who answered know CSS well!

The right answer: both will be blue! 🤯

The class order on the element does not matter. These two classes have the same specificity, so CSS falls back to source order. Today y'all learned!

Demo: https://t.co/OB2rh2OWG4 https://t.co/lgNP5VkEsO

— Max Stoiber (@mxstbr) September 8, 2018

and the quiz to which it refers.

Tim Kadlec followed up with a detailed post, which doubles as a passionate defence of understanding the core technologies of web development, among them CSS.

I agree considerably with Tim, but I also understand where others who take different perspective (mostly tweets, I’ve not found a detailed post countering Tim’s) are coming from.

Developing for the Web is hard

Here’s the thing. Developing for the Web places a significant burden on developers knowledge, and I think I have a reasonable perspective on this having for many yeas been a developer for the Mac OS and Windows.

When developing for most platforms (like Mac OS, or iOS) developers have

And this doesn’t even begin to address the networked architecture of Web applications (even with Service Worker, manifests and PWAs, we don’t by any means have the sort of luxury that installed apps do in terms of performance, bundling, packaging). Or that while traditionally most platforms had a quite standardised look and feel, and standard, OS supplied widgets, this is far less true of the Web.

Many have spoken about the challenge of becoming a Web developer today, and I’ll be honest, I’m not sure whether I’d be up to it (particularly at these of 51).

And then lets consider what we are building and are expected to build now, compared with what the Web looked like even 10 years ago, let alone over 20 when CSS first started to have some sort of impact.

So I have considerable sympathy for those who express frustration with complexities, who look to build layers of abstraction (React, Vue, and so on) to hide these complexities, and help developer productivity. There are many very smart, increasingly far more experienced developers than me whom I admire greatly who articulate this point of view, most of whom are far from new to developing for the Web. People like Mark Dalgleish, and Glen Maddern (who are among the most frequent speakers at our events).

Dialog not debate?

I feel there’s an important dialog missing here, one I’ve been trying to foster at various of our conferences going back some years (I’ve brought together a number of these presentations below if you want to watch them).

One the one hand (and this will somewhat simplify each ‘side’, for the sake of brevity, not disrespect to either), we have those, and I’d on balance probably include myself in this camp, who’d argue that the core technologies of the Web are precisely that–foundational, and a deep understanding of them conceptually (not necessarily an encyclopaedic knowledge of every syntactic aspect) is fundamental working knowledge for professional Web developers.

The other side would argue that just as this was true of assembly language 40 years ago, and the abstractions we’ve built above the lower level tools in the intervening years mean assembly is no longer a core technology, the growing complexity of what we build for the Web and the associated frameworks and abstractions (Vue, Angular, React) means a deep understanding of technologies like CSS, HTML and JavaScript, and specifically problematic aspects like CSS’s global scope, specificity rules and the cascade are no longer core knowledge (or shouldn’t be and need to be abstracted away).

What I do feel is lacking from this conversation is something I’ve been trying to get at in a number of the presentations and discussions we commissioned for our conferences over the last 2-3 years. Just as jQuery introduced concepts and language and platform features (classlist, querySelector, to name a couple) by highlighting the shortcomings of the DOM from a web app perspective, and compile-to-jaavscript languages like coffeescript (arrow functions) on JavaScript, what is it that CSS (in particular, it seems CSS is the recurring ‘culprit’ here) lacks, that CSS-in-JS, and other approaches are looking to work around? And how might CSS evolve to incorporate these?

Harnessing The Web’s Iterative Innovation

Because the cycle of innovation we’ve seen over decades now when it comes to its technologies has been innovation on top of the core languages and platform features like the DOM (some times this innovation takes place in the browser, sometimes in frameworks and libraries, sometimes in conventions, patterns and practices). These innovations prove the use case and value of their approach, and the ones that bring the greatest benefit are reabsorbed into the underlying languages and technologies.

No one doubts for a moment that ES today has improved dramatically due to this approach. And at a much greater rate than it did before the days of jQuery and coffee script et al.

But all this takes dialog, each ‘side’ articulating their position, listening to the other, in a spirit of trying to understand, not simply attempting, rhetorically or otherwise to win. What’s the goal here? To be right? Two win the argument, or to help the Web become the best platform it can be?

Related Presentations

It’s precisely this challenge I’ve been trying to tease out for some time with various presentations by invited experts at our conferences these last few years.

In particular at Code 2017, we had Mark Dalgleish, and Glen Maddern and Mandy Michael

Glen Maddern–The Road to Styled Components: CSS in Component-based Systems

Glen Maddern, who along with Max Stoiber (see the tweet that started all this off above from Max), took the best of CSS and the web to build a new way to style component-based systems. In this talk, Glen shared what they thought about and why they arrived where they did: styled-components

Mark Dalgleish–A Unified Styling Language

In the past few years, we’ve witnessed a massive increase in the amount of CSS experimentation, with ideas like CSS Modules and — most controversially — the rise of CSS-in-JS. But does mixing our styles and logic run counter to the original ideas of CSS? Does it break progressive enhancement?

In this talk, we’ll take an empathetic look at these new approaches, how they relate to the history of CSS, and why they might possibly hold the key to the future of CSS — all from the point of view of someone who has been writing CSS since 1999.

Mandy Michael–Traditional CSS at Scale(?)

Mandy Michael loves CSS. She believes there’s power in its simplicity and flexibility.

When the team at Seven West Media Perth redeveloped The West Australian’s digital platform in a tight 4-month deadline, they embraced the CSS they know and love with a component driven approach, utilising ITCSS, BEM and SCSS with strict linting and code review. But while she’s a long-time lover of traditional approaches to CSS, the lessons Mandy learned have led her to the ultimate question: is there a better way?

RoundTable

We then brought Mandy, Glen and Mark together for a further discussion of the issues their presentations had raised.

The post Iterating on the Web appeared first on Web Directions.

New Proposed Recommendation: Selectors Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page11 September 2018

11 Sep 2018 New Proposed Recommendation: Selectors Level 3.

Web Directions Summit ’18 Program launched

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 07 September 2018

We’re in full swing gearing up for our annual Summit, our big two track conference, taking place November 1 and 2 in Sydney.

This year we’re excited to be returning to our home for many years, the Convention Centre in Darling Harbour, Sydney. Bringing as good a lineup as we’ve ever had.

The full program is online now, and we’ll be focusing on some of the speakers, topics and themes in the coming weeks.

For frontend developers and engineers we’ll be covering GraphQL, Performance, JavaScript in-depth, CSS layout, variable fonts, and much more.

In the Design track we’ll address conversational interfaces, designing across cultures, UX research, design systems, content strategy, ethics in design and a whole lot more.

All topped and tailed with engaging, challenging keynotes from the likes of Oliver Reichenstein and Maria Giudice.

If you’ve been to our Summit before, you’ll know it’s amazing speakers and ideas in a fantastic setting, fully catered, great coffee and more. If you’ve not been and you work in web, technology and design, this is the event on the Australia calendar for our industry, as it has been for many years.

Places are going quickly, and early bird pricing ends September 14th, so don’t miss out.

But that’s not all

This year, Web Directions Summit is preceded by two, one day, focussed conferences, Culture and AI.

Culture

Culture addresses the challenges in building great teams, and organisational cultures. From hiring to onboarding to developing teams, there’s insights from real world experts. Whether you’re a manager of design or engineering teams, or work in people, talent, or HR, Culture will help you do this better.

AI

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are no longer the preserve of large companies with huge budgets. “AI as a service” like Watson, and similar services from AWS, Google Cloud Platform, and other providers bring natural language processing, image recognition, speech to text, text to speech, and other AI capabilities into the hands of small teams and startups.

Our AI conference looks at the business, design and technology challenges, as well as the opportunities presented by these technologies, with case studies and insights from people using them right now.

What seems a bit like science fiction today will be bread and butter for digital products and services before too long. Get up to speed with these opportunities at AI.

The post Web Directions Summit ’18 Program launched appeared first on Web Directions.

Updated Working Draft of CSS Box Alignment Level 3

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 31 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Box Alignment Module Level 3. This module contains the features of CSS relating to the alignment of boxes within their containers in the various CSS box layout models: block layout, table layout, flex layout, and grid layout. It also includes the new cross-module gap properties (row-gap, column-gap, gap).

This update contains better and more thorough definitions of the effect of self-alignment on statically-positioned absolutely-positioned boxes
and of content-alignment on scroll containers. See specific changes.

One interesting and useful side-effect of these changes is that the internal padding of a scroll container will increase the scrollable area at the block-end and inline-end edges of a scroll container with non-normal content alignment, resolving a longstanding author request.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-align-3]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Alignment Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page30 August 2018

30 Aug 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Alignment Level 3.

Candidate Recommendation of CSS Display Level 3

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 28 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published a Candidate Recommendation and invites implementations of the CSS Display Module Level 3. This module describes how the CSS formatting box tree is generated
from the document element tree and defines properties that control the types of boxes thus generated.

New features since Level 2 include:

The draft also features

Changes since the last Working Draft are listed in the Changes section. A Disposition of Comments is also available.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-display]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated CSS Cascading and Inheritance Levels 3 & 4

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 28 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published updated Candidate Recommendations of CSS Cascading and Inheritance Level 3 and CSS Cascading and Inheritance Level 4. This CSS module describes how to collate style rules and assign values to all properties on all elements by way of cascading (choosing a winning declaration among many) and inheritance (propagating values from parent to child).

These updates are largely about clarifications; however we also:

A full list of changes since the earlier publications are listed in the Changes sections: Level 3 Changes, Level 4 Changes. See also the Dispositions of Comments: Level 3 DoC, Level 4 DoC

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-cascade]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Display Level 3. Updated C…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page28 August 2018

28 Aug 2018 New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Display Level 3. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Cascading and Inheritance Level 3. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Cascading and Inheritance Level 4.

Updated Draft of CSS Logical Properties and Values Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 27 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Logical Properties and Values Level 1. This module introduces properties and values that control layout through
logical (writing-mode–relative), rather than physical, direction and dimension mappings.

The most significant open issue in the draft is the syntax for switching margin-style
shorthand parsing from physical to logical. The CSSWG would appreciate feedback and suggestions on this feature, see Issue 1282 and comment about constraints.

The other two open issues are about how logical longhands inherit (Issue 3029) and whether shorthands expand to all longhands or only either logical or physical (Issue 3030). Use cases that would tip the decision in one direction vs the other are particularly welcome (so far we have none, so the only consideration at the moment is implementation complexity).

We encourage everyone interested in this module to put some thought into these issues and to send any feedback for consideration. We hope to close off the issues by the end of October and transition the module to Candidate Recommendation shortly afterwards.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-logical-1]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated Working Draft: CSS Logical Properties and Values Lev…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page27 August 2018

27 Aug 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Logical Properties and Values Level 1.

Minutes Telecon 2018-08-22

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 22 August 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Minutes Telecon 2018-08-15

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 15 August 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

Updated CR of CSS Scroll Snapping Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blog fantasai • 15 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Candidate Recommendation of CSS Scroll Snapping Module Level 1. his module contains features to control panning and scrolling behavior with “snap positions”.

The Changes include:

CSS Values and Units L3 Updated CR

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 15 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Candidate Recommendation of CSS Values and Units Level 3. This CSS module describes the common values and units that CSS properties accept and the syntax used for describing them in CSS property definitions.

Changes since the 2016 Candidate Recommendation include

A Disposition of Comments is also available. Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-values-3]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

New Proposed Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3. New Working …

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page14 August 2018

14 Aug 2018 New Proposed Recommendation: CSS Fonts Level 3. New Working Draft: CSS Values and Units Level 4. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Values and Units Level 3.

New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Painting API Level 1. Upda…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page09 August 2018

9 Aug 2018 New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Painting API Level 1. Updated Working Draft: CSS Display Level 3. Updated Working Draft: CSS Box Model Level 3.

Call for Review: EPUB 3.2

Source: W3C BlogDave Cramer • 08 August 2018

We live in exciting times for the world of ebook standards, with the IDPF-W3C merger and web publications. Yet for most of us, the EPUB we create and consume has not changed in a while. EPUB 3.0 came out nearly seven years ago. The minor changes of EPUB 3.0.1 happened more than four years ago. EpubCheck hasn’t had a major release in nearly three years. That’s not necessarily a bad thing for mature specs. EPUB 3 works. It satisfies lots of use cases, and lots of actual users. Most publishers have existing tools and processes to create and distribute EPUB 3 (if you don’t, you should).

But the world, and especially the world wide web, keeps changing. HTML and CSS, the building blocks of EPUB, keep getting more powerful. Implementations evolve. New media types are invented. And specs must adapt to those changes. In April, I wrote a blog post about the recent history of EPUB 3, and why the W3C EPUB 3 Community Group was working on EPUB 3.2.

I’m pleased to say that the work has gone well. We’ve created a draft spec that satisfies our requirements of being completely backward-compatible with EPUB 3.0.1, while updating EPUB’s relationship to the core web specs of HTML, CSS, SVG, etc. But don’t take my word for it—go see for yourself.

Consider this a formal request for wide review of the EPUB 3.2 specification. Let us know what you think. Is the spec clear? Readable? Implementable? We want to hear about everything from typos to fatal flaws. If you’re comfortable with GitHub, the best way to provide feedback is through GitHub Issues. We’re also happy to receive emails. The ambitious can even send us pull requests.

EPUB 3.2 is a modular family of specifications. Feel free to review any or all of them. Note that we have not made any changes to EPUB Accessibility, as it is not tied to a particular version of EPUB.

  1. EPUB 3.2 Overview: A non-normative introduction to EPUB
  2. EPUB 3.2 Specification: One spec to rule them all!
  3. EPUB Packages 3.2: describes the package document, which provides both metadata and structure for the publication
  4. EPUB Content Documents 3.2: the good stuff: HTML, CSS, and more!
  5. EPUB Open Container Format: how to turn a bundle of content into a single file
  6. EPUB Media Overlays 3.2: how to synchronize audio and text in EPUB
  7. EPUB 3.2 Changes: what’s changed since EPUB 3.0.1.

Our plan is to spend about two months in this final review period, until around the end of September or beginning of October. We will address all the feedback, and create a final version of EPUB 3.2, which will need approval from the Publishing Business Group before being published as a final community group report.

Thank you for your attention, and please let us know if you have any questions.

—Dave Cramer (Hachette Livre) and Rachel Comerford (Macmillan Learning), co-chairs of the EPUB 3 Community Group.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Inline Layout Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page08 August 2018

8 Aug 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Inline Layout Level 3.

CSS Grid Level 2 Updated: Subgrid Specification Completed

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 04 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Grid Layout Level 2. This draft contains the “subgrid” feature that was cut from the Level 1 CR last year, along with a few other minor things.

At this point there are no further issues open against the subgrid feature, so we’re asking for everyone to conduct their final reviews against the feature. Changes since the last Working Draft are listed in the Changes section.

For the next update of this draft, we’ll be incorporating the full text of the CSS Grid Level 1 specification along with the spec text for a few small feature requests (which depend on incorporating the L1 prose):

Once that text is incorporated, the Level 2 spec will be feature complete, and we’ll start preparing it for Candidate Recommendation.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-grid-2]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated WD of CSS Inline Layout Level 3

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 04 August 2018

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Inline Layout Level 3. This module describes the css features relating to inline box layout in the block-axis dimension, particularly vertical alignment within a line and initial letter styling (drop caps, etc.).

This update includes a pile of improvements to the specification for initial letter styling as well as the outline of a property to control the height of the background/border areas of an inline box. Changes since the last Working Draft are listed in the Changes section.

There are still a lot of open issues, including more precise definition of the initial letters’ layout model as well as several property/value naming issues. The CSSWG welcomes feedback on these issues and on the draft in general.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-inline-3]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated Working Draft: CSS Grid Layout Level 2.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page04 August 2018

4 Aug 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Grid Layout Level 2.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Inline Layout Level 3.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page02 August 2018

2 Aug 2018 Updated Working Draft: CSS Inline Layout Level 3.

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