The future of style

The Future of Style aggregates posts from various blogs that talk about the development of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) [not development with Cascading Style Sheets]. While it is hosted by the W3C CSS Working Group, the content of the individual entries represent only the opinion of their respective authors and does not reflect the position of the CSS Working Group or the W3C.

Latest articles

W3C Strategic Highlights: Web for All (Web Accessibility)

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 25 March 2019

 

WAI icon

(This post is part of a series recapping the October 2018 W3C Strategic Highlights and does not include significant updates since that report.)

W3C “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)  2.1”, which became a W3C Recommendation in June, has been adopted for web content, electronic documents, and non-web software, such as native mobile applications by the three official European Standards Organizations, CEN, CENELEC, and ETSI who published an updated version of EN 301 549 “Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services”. W3C staff involvement fosters continued harmonization of formal and informal European standards with the international technical guidance from W3C.

A billion people in the world have disabilities—one out of every seven—according to the World Report on Disabilities. Helping build accessibility-supporting specifications, guidelines, evaluation and educational materials helps ensure that your own organization is improving access to the Web for people with disabilities.

Learn why accessibility is essential for people with disabilities and useful for all: watch the Video Introduction to Web Accessibility and W3C Standards (4 minutes).

Accessibility activities support W3C’s Web for All mission. The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) continues to help ensure a cohesive package of coordinated accessibility activities, distributed throughout the groups and areas of W3C. Notable progress include:

Accessibility reviewers for W3C specs are always welcome in the APA WG, and the RQTF is looking for industry and user community researchers.

W3C Strategic Highlights: Web for All (Internationalization (i18n))

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 21 March 2019

 

text and signs in different language scripts

Internationalization (i18n)

(This post is part of a series recapping the October 2018 W3C Strategic Highlights and does not include significant updates since that report.)

To live up to the “World Wide” portion of its name, and for the Web to truly work for stakeholders all around the world, there must be a collaboration of language experts, Web site designers, developers, and vendors who are active in moving the Web forward. To ensure a rapid response to the growth of the Web, the W3C wants to marshal the resources of organizations and experts who care about these problems and enlist their help in strengthening internationalization support for the Web.

The W3C Internationalization Initiative was set up last July to supplement the core funding received from W3C Member fees so as to increase in-house resources dedicated to accelerating progress in making the World Wide Web “worldwide” by gathering user requirements, supporting developers, and education & outreach. In the next year, we have set the following goals:

For an overview of current projects see the i18n radar. W3C’s Internationalization efforts progressed on a number of fronts recently:

The Web needs your help

Photo: a boy Tibetan monk, reading a book with Tibetan letters

W3C’s Internationalization Initiative a sponsorship program is designed to provide participants and funding to address three main aspects of the internationalization continuum:

Enablement Development Education
Stake­hold­ers Governments, Publishers, User communities,… W3C Working Groups, Application developers,… Content authors & developers, localizers,…
Typ­i­cal ac­tiv­i­ties Gap analysis & prioritization Documenting requirements Guidelines & checklists Reviews Architectural solutions Educational resources Outreach Checker tools

Minutes Telecon 2019-03-20

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 20 March 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page19 March 2019

19 Mar 2019 Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 78

Source: Surfin' Safari 16 March 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 78 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 242087-242836.

Pointer Events

Web Inspector

WebDriver

Web API

Accessibility

Media

Minutes Telecon 2019-03-13

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 13 March 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Dynamic Typography with Fluid Sizing and Variable Fonts–Jason Pamental at Design ’19

Source: Web Directions Blog John • 11 March 2019

Typography has been one of the great challenges in digital design, particularly on the Web. The arrival of font embedding, and services like Typekit a few years ago extended the range of fonts available to designers significantly, but came with performance costs.

And while designers developed ‘responsive’ techniques for layout, responsive typography, that adapts to the user’s screen size and resolution has taken longer to emerge. One of the real pioneers of responsive typography (he literally wrote the book on it) is Jason  Pamental, who we’re privileged to have speak at Design ’19.

About Jason Pamental

Jason is a seasoned design and user experience strategy leader with over 20 years’ experience on the web in both creative and technical roles, and an Invited Expert to the W3C Web Fonts Working Group.

Dynamic Typography with Fluid Sizing and Variable Fonts

At Design ’19 Jason will look at newer developments in CSS make it easier than ever to create robust, scalable, elegant typographic systems on the web and in apps. But the fun really starts when you add Variable Fonts. The design, technical, and performance benefits are really exciting, but when you combine them with other CSS capabilities like custom properties, calculations, and grid it’s a whole new way to think about design and development.

He’ll cover how they work together by using some variable fonts in layouts that work across screen dimensions, accessibility needs, design requirements, and even network speeds—better than you thought possible.

About Design ’19

Great design is no longer a nice to have for successful digital products, services and customer experiences. It’s vitally important. Design brings world leading experts across the complete Product Design spectrum to share their insights and expertise. If you are involved with the design of digital product or services, you can’t afford to miss this one-of-a-kind Australian event. Only in Melbourne, arguably Australia’s Design capital, April 11 and 12, 2019.

Who’s it for?

Design is for everyone involved with the design of great products and services. From user research, to product owners and managers, UX, CX, IxD and Product Designers, Design Managers, Art and Creative Directors, content developers and strategists.

Register now

Tickets start from just $1195, for early bird pricing (ends March 16). So don’t delay, register today!

The post Dynamic Typography with Fluid Sizing and Variable Fonts–Jason Pamental at Design ’19 appeared first on Web Directions.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 77

Source: Surfin' Safari 06 March 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 77 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 241432-242087.

WebRTC

Web API

CSS Grid

Accessibility

Media

Web Inspector

Bug Fixes

Safari app Extensions

Updated Working Draft: CSS Color Level 4.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page05 March 2019

5 Mar 2019 Updated Working Draft: CSS Color Level 4.

Updated Working Draft: CSS Pseudo-Elements Level 4.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page25 February 2019

25 Feb 2019 Updated Working Draft: CSS Pseudo-Elements Level 4.

W3C Strategic Highlights: Strengthening the Core of the Web (Fonts)

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 21 February 2019

table showing increments of increasing font usage

(This post is part of a series recapping the October 2018 W3C Strategic Highlights and does not include significant updates since that report.

WOFF 1.0 and WOFF 2.0, published as a Recommendation last winter, are widely implemented W3C Recommendations. However, for fonts with many glyphs (such as are typically used for Chinese and Japanese, for example), even with the compression provided by WOFF, download sizes are still large. Static subsetting runs the risk of missing glyphs, or some text being rendered in a fallback font.

Early experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of a font enrichment API, where a server delivers a font with minimal glyph repertoire and the client can query the full repertoire and request additional subsets on-the-fly. The API takes care of progressively enriching the downloaded font, without requiring cumbersome CSS manipulations or multiple, separate font files. This API could be implemented as a script library, or as a native browser API. In other experiments, the Brotli compression used in WOFF 2 was extended to support shared dictionaries and patch update. This avoids the need for a new API or a new transport protocol. It still requires the browser to implement dynamic patching and refresh of in-use font resources.

The Fonts Working Group was recently chartered to examine, and solve, this font enrichment issue.

Read more in the newly chartered Fonts Working Group charter, and the W3C Blog post on CSS Fonts 3.

Minutes Telecon 2019-02-20

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 21 February 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 76

Source: Surfin' Safari 20 February 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 76 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 240780-241432.

Dark Mode

WebRTC

Web API

CSS

Rendering

Payment Request

Media

Web Inspector

Browser Changes

W3C Strategic Highlights: Strengthening the Core of the Web (CSS)

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 18 February 2019

 

image demonstrating discretionary ligatures

 

(This post is part of a series recapping the October 2018 W3C Strategic Highlights and does not include significant updates since that report.)

The CSS Working Group gathers requirements from two large groups of CSS users: the publishing industry and application developers. Within W3C, those groups are exemplified by the Publishing groups and the Web Platform Working Group. The former requires things like better pagination support and advanced font handling, the latter needs intelligent (and fast!) scrolling and animations.

What we know as CSS is actually a collection of almost a hundred specifications, referred to as ‘modules’. The group published 38 documents since July 2018 (Working Drafts, Candidate Recommendations); a significant increase due to the recent automation and streamlining of the transition request process, and facilitating transition requests with the Director.

In this period, the CSS Working Group published 3 W3C Recommendations:

  1. CSS UI Module level 3
  2. CSS Color Module level 3
  3. CSS Fonts Module level 3

CSS Fonts Module level 3 specifies how to link and use a downloadable font with CSS (thus completing our Fonts story following publication of the WOFF 2 format earlier this year). CSS Color Module level 3 defines how colors are specified on the Web. And CSS UI Module level 3 defines cursors, focus outlines, and text ellipsis (to indicate text that cannot  fit in the space provided).

Read more  about CSS and see All CSS specifications.

New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Transforms Level 1.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page14 February 2019

14 Feb 2019 New Candidate Recommendation: CSS Transforms Level 1.

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 75

Source: Surfin' Safari 06 February 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 75 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 239991-240780.

WebRTC

Intelligent Tracking Prevention

Web Authentication

Media

Accessibility

Layout

Web API

WebDriver

Web Inspector

CSS

Browser Changes

Bug Fixes

Updated CR of CSS Contain

Source: CSS WG Blog Florian Rivoal • 04 February 2019

(This should have been published much earlier. Apologies for the belated announcement).

The CSS WG has published a Candidate Recommendation and invites implementations of the CSS Containment Module Level 1.

This CSS module describes the contain property, which indicates that the element’s subtree is independent of the rest of the page. This enables heavy optimizations by user agents when used well.

This is a minor update, driven by implementation experience and testing, focused on bug fixing and clarifications. Barring anything unexpected, the CSS-WG expects little to no change after this. People who intend to review this specification but have not yet had the chance to do so are strongly encouraged to look at it as soon as possible, as implementations are progressing, and growing usage in the wild will increasingly limit possible changes.

Significant changes are listed in the change section. A comprehensive test suite for the full specification was developed. A Disposition of Comments is also available.

Please send feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-contain]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated CR of CSS Scroll Snapping Level 1

Source: CSS WG Blogfantasai • 31 January 2019

The CSS Working Group has published an updated Candidate Recommendation of CSS Scroll Snapping Module Level 1. This module contains features to control panning and scrolling behavior with “snap positions”.

The Changes are just fixing some errors in the previous draft. See also Disposition of Comments.

Please send any further feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-scroll-snap-1]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Updated <‘property’> notation in Value Definition Syntax

Source: CSS WG Blog fantasai • 31 January 2019

The CSSWG just published updates to CSS Values and Units Level 3 and CSS Values and Units Level 4 redefining the <'property'> notation, which represents the value space of a property for re-use in other syntax definitions, to exclude any top-level #-multiplier. (See §2 Value Definition Syntax.)

The reason for this change it to make it easier to define syntax for list-valued properties and shorthands: for example, previously <'background-clip'> would represent [ border-box | padding-box | content-box ]# (a list of keywords), which precluded re-using it in defining the background shorthand syntax. Now that the top-level #-mark is ignored when importing syntaxes this way, shorthands of list-valued properties and other patterns which extend an existing value set become much easier to describe.

The full list of changes since the previous CR update can be found in the Changes section, and a Disposition of Comments is also available. (There were no substantive changes to Level 4 other than copying over the Level 3 changes.)

Please send any feedback by either filing an issue in GitHub (preferable) or sending mail to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org with the spec code ([css-values]) and your comment topic in the subject line. (Alternatively, you can email one of the editors and ask them to forward your comment.)

Minutes Telecon 2019-01-30

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 31 January 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Updated Working Draft: CSS Values and Units Level 4. Updated…

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page31 January 2019

31 Jan 2019 Updated Working Draft: CSS Values and Units Level 4. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Values and Units Level 3. Updated Candidate Recommendation: CSS Scroll Snap Level 1.

W3C Dev Meetup 2018 retrospective

Source: W3C BlogMarie-Claire Forgue • 24 January 2019

Taking advantage of the presence of world renowned Web experts attending the TPAC18 week last October in Lyon, the W3C developer relations team organized a developer meetup featuring five prominent speakers and twelve demonstrations. Hosted by the University of Lyon, this event was made possible with the support from Qwant, Microsoft, Mozilla, NTT Communications, StickerMule, Webcastor and WithYou.

What a successful event! About 250 participants joined us and all the rooms were instantly packed. The evening started with a first visit of the demos. These were  a combination of technologies already in deployment as well as technologies still under exploration and prototyping. Standards-track demos included CSS Houdini, Web Authentication, Web Audio, Immersive Web, Web of Things and Web payments. As for the demos of exploratory technologies, we had IntersectionObserver v2, Machine learning for the Web, MapML and WebVMT. In addition, the event’s sponsors Qwant and NTT Communications demoed a privacy tool called “Masq” and a WebRTC Gateway, respectively.

Organizres are kicking off the devmeetup Rachel Andrew presents at W3C developer meetup in Lyon, 2018 All #devmeetup18 speakers wearing a W3C cooking cap

Then, everyone was invited to listen to the speakers. Each one delivered an expert talk: Rachel Andrew on CSS Layout, Ali Spivak on documenting Web standards on MDN, Manuel Rego on how to participate in the CSS specs development, Tristan Nitot on privacy and online services, and Richard Ishida on making the Web truly world wide.

Banner of the W3C devmeetup 18 in Lyon Stickers of some W3C technologies, that were provided by sponsor StickerMule Demo table showing WebRTC gateway by sponsor NTT Communications

The five presentations are linked from the meetup page, and  it is now possible to  watch the talks since they were recorded by Webcastor, a Lyon-based video company. We are also thankful that Qihoo 360 Technology Co Ltd. created the English captions and translated Chinese subtitles.

Find these videos and many other ones on W3C’s Vimeo page! In particular, check the short videos of Web experts shot during the TPAC week: Luke Wagner on Web Assembly, Fantasai on Spec editing best practices, Ada Rose Cannon on WebVR, etc.

Fantasai does a short video interview on Editing Specs Best Practices Luke Wagner presents the furure of Web Assembly

Please follow us on @w3cdevs to find out more about an upcoming W3C’s staff and members presence in your region, to track new Web technology development, and to understand how to contribute to W3C work.

In any case, mark your calendar now: the next W3C developer meetup, co-located with TPAC2019, is scheduled for Monday 16 September 2019, in Fukuoka, Japan. Stay tuned!

Photos credit: Eric Eggert and Marie-Claire Forgue

Minutes Telecon 2019-01-23

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 24 January 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 74

Source: Surfin' Safari 23 January 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 74 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 239566-239991.

Fetch API

Web Animations

Web Authentication

WebRTC

Media

CSS

Web API

Service Workers

JavaScript

Accessibility

Web Inspector

WebDriver

Storage

Security

What’s new in Chromium 71 and Opera 58

Source: Dev.OperaDaniel Bratell • 23 January 2019

Opera 58 (based on Chromium 71) for Mac, Windows, Linux is out! To find out what’s new for users, see our Desktop blog post. Here’s what it means for web developers.

Support for COLR/CPAL fonts

Opera now supports COLR/CPAL fonts which are vector based fonts with color information. As fonts become available, we can expect Unicode-based emojis to become more interesting.

Performance > Async touchpad pinch zoom events

By default touchpad events create synchronous synthetic ctrl+wheel events that allow documents to cancel them. This can unfortunately greatly increase the time between a user action and changes on the screen. To improve the situation the browser has changed so that if the first synthetic ctrl+wheel event is let through, then no more synthetic events will be created. If you do want to cancel pinch zoom, you need to cancel all the events. You can read more about this in the design document

JavaScript

JavaScript > Internationalization of relative times

With Intl.RelativeTimeFormat() you can now get relative time descriptions for any supported locale. Two simple examples below:

formatter = new Intl.RelativeTimeFormat("en");
formatter.format(2.5, "hour");  // "in 2.5 hours"

formatter = new Intl.RelativeTimeFormat("sv", {numeric: "auto"});  // Swedish, text or numbers.
formatter.format(-1, "week");  // "förra veckan" (last week)

You can read more about what you can do with Intl.RelativeTimeFormat by reading what the feature developers say about it.

JavaScript Modules: Credentials mode defaults to “same-origin”

The default credentials mode for module script requests is changing from “omit” to “same-origin”, providing credentials to same-origin module script requests and their descendant scripts (static & dynamic imports). The previous behavior can be surprising in that it is misaligned with other high-level features like the Fetch API, and could not be reused for the main request, causing a second server connection which added latency.

Media

Media > Removed SpeechSynthesis.speak without user activation

Unfortunately speechSynthesis.speak() has been abused so it will now only be available once the user has interacted with the page. With this change, everything that makes sounds follows the same autoplay policy.

Media > MediaElement and MediaStream nodes defined only for AudioContext (removed from OfflineAudioContext)

Opera now only allows creation of MediaElementAudioSourceNode, MediaStreamAudioSourceNode, and MediaStreamAudioDestinationNode elements using an AudioContext. Previously these could be created using an OfflineAudioContext, but that does not comply with the specification and made little sense.

Media > URL.createObject() can no longer be used for MediaStreams

The normal way to embed MediaStreams is to assign them to scrObject, but until now URL.createObject() has also worked. It has been deprecated since 2013 though and with this release, that obsolete method has been removed.

ServiceWorkers > Changes to when importScript() can be run

ServiceWorkers can no longer import scripts with importScripts() once the ServiceWorker has been installed.

Storage > Persistent storage permission requests

A site can request to store data persistently, that is, in a way that will not be exposed to automatic deletion just because of lack of storage space. In this version a site can request the user’s permission to do so through the persistent-storage property in the Permission API.

Removed document.origin

The document.origin property was not cross-browser and the supported, cross-browser, way to access ones origin is with self.origin so in this release document.origin was removed.

TextEncoderStream and TextDecoderStream APIs

Text encoding and decoding can now be done with streams to enable you to easily convert streams of binary data to text and vice-versa.

Unprefixed fullscreen API

For many years, the fullscreen API has had a vendor prefix (which all browser vendors have reused), but coming in Opera 58, and other Chromium 71 browser, there is a fully unprefixed fullscreen API.

CSS

CSS > Shorter syntax for double stops in color gradients

It is common to repeat color stops in a gradient to create single colored bands like this:

linear-gradient(45deg, black 25%, black 50%, white 50%, white 75%)

With the new CSS4 specification comes support for a more compact syntax where the repeated color name is no longer needed:

linear-gradient(45deg, black 25% 50%, white 50% 75%)

CSS > left and right for text-underline-position

Vertical text has had slightly undefined positioning of underlines. With the newly added values left and right for text-underline-position, it should now be possible to make a cross-browser declaration of where an underline should be positioned.

CSS > Improve :host, :host-context, and ::slotted specificity

Certain Shadow DOM v1 CSS selectors did not match in the correct order. In Opera 58, :host() and :host-context() pseudo classes as well as ::slotted() arguments will be taken into account when calculating a selectors specificity.

WebKitAnimationEvent and WebKitTransitionEvent are removed

AnimationEvent and TransitionEvent, without the WebKit prefix, has been available for some time and in this Opera version the prefixed versions were removed after usage dropped had sufficiently.

What’s next?

If you’re interested in experimenting with features that are in the pipeline for future versions of Opera, we recommend following our Opera Developer stream.

You can also see features that we and other Chromium/Blink contributors are working on by looking at the Chrome Platform Status page.

Updated Note: CSS Snapshot 2018.

Source: W3C's Cascading Style Sheets home page22 January 2019

22 Jan 2019 Updated Note: CSS Snapshot 2018.

Minutes Telecon 2019-01-16

Source: CSS WG BlogDael Jackson • 17 January 2019

Full Meeting Minutes

Release Notes for Safari Technology Preview 73

Source: Surfin' Safari 16 January 2019

Safari Technology Preview Release 73 is now available for download for macOS Mojave and macOS High Sierra. If you already have Safari Technology Preview installed, you can update in the Software Update pane of System Preferences on macOS Mojave and from the Mac App Store’s Updates tab on macOS High Sierra. After updating to macOS Mojave, you may have to reinstall Safari Technology Preview.

This release covers WebKit revisions 239091-239566.

Web API

JavaScript

CSS

Media

WebRTC

Web Animations

Web Authentication

WebGPU

Web Inspector

W3C Strategic Highlights: Introduction

Source: W3C Blog Amy van der Hiel • 14 January 2019

Over the next few weeks and months we’ll be exploring the latest W3C Strategic Highlights document here in the W3C blog in a bit more depth in order to give a deeper overview of the work W3C does to consolidate, optimize and enhance the existing landscape, which includes innovation, incubation, and research for the growth and strength of the Web (see also Jeff Jaffe’s blog post “Looking Back at TPAC 2018; Public Release of W3C Strategic Highlights” from November 2018). graphic showing the pipeline of Web innovation [Lightbulb design credit: Freepik]

W3C Strategic Highlights

The W3C Strategic Highlights outlines an exciting pipeline of innovations that W3C is working on to enable the Web to scale to meet new challenges and opportunities. Over the next weeks and months, we will focus on progress in many areas which demonstrates the vitality of the W3C and the Web community as well as the maturation and further development of an incredible number of new technologies coming to the Web.

These technologies include:

Please check back here to read more about this new work!

Minutes Telecon 2018-12-19

Source: CSS WG Blog Dael Jackson • 20 December 2018

Full Meeting Minutes

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