W3C

Category Archives: Workshops

HTML5 Tour hits India!

W3C has embarked on an HTML5 Tour in India and it is a huge success. The W3C India team, under the leadership of Swaran Lata, has put together a five city tour that launched 17 Sept 2013 in New Delhi, India. In putting the tour together, the Office worked with Mike Smith, HTML Activity Lead, […]
More…

W3C and Digital Publishing

The publishing world in general is undergoing major changes these days due to the presence of Web technologies. People are using electronic book readers more and more. “Citizen journalism” through blogs offers new possibilities to express people’s opinion, thereby also...
More…

Do Not Track in the Short, Medium and Long Term

Since we last talked about Do Not Track on this blog, the Tracking Protection Working Group has continued the hard work of making decisions and driving to consensus. The Working Group is now preparing for a face-to-face meeting in October. Furthermore, W3C is holding a broader-looking workshop to take place in November.
More…

The W3C Social Business Jam is a few days away!

There’s been a lot of discussion on how the social web is changing business. One of the challenges slowing down the adoption of social web is due to a lack of cross-industry interoperability, as social business is still in its early stages. Open standards are one way the industry can overcome this challenge. As the W3C is one of the organizations working to help, we've decided to host an event to determine future directions for standardizing the social web for business-driven use-cases. The all online W3C Social Business Jam runs from Nov 8-10th (Tuesday through Thursday) and you have to register to participate.
More…

Web Tracking and User Privacy Workshop: Test Cases for Privacy on the Web

The level of interest and participation in last month's Workshop on Web Tracking and User Privacy — about a hundred attendees spanning multiple countries, dozens of companies, a wide variety of backgrounds — confirms the broad interest in Do Not Track. These discussions are test cases for how we will handle privacy on the Web and how standards can address complex issues involving both technology and policy.
More…