W3C

Category Archives: Technology

Data on the Web? Here’s How

Este artigo em português I want a revolution. Not a political one, and certainly not a violent one, but a revolution nonetheless. A revolution in the way people think about the way data is shared on the Web, whether openly or not. This is where I typically start talking about people using the Web as […]
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Efficient representation for Web formats

EXI is a format that sends an efficient data stream of parse events that can have noticeable, measurable savings in CPU, memory and bandwidth. Test results have consistently shown EXI advantages for XML, HTML, and now CSS/JavaScript minify, over gzip and zip formats. You may want to look at EXI overview presentation for CSS. Since […]
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HTML 5.1 is the gold standard

A couple weeks ago the W3C Web Platform Working Group published HTML 5.1 as a Standard. It was merely days after the second anniversary of the advent of the 5th major version of the core language of the World Wide Web (you may read the press release we put out when HTML 5 became a W3C recommendation). […]
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W3C and Big Data

The term big data, or to give it marketing spin, Big Data, means different things to different people. For operators of wind turbine arrays it might mean handling the 2GB of data created by each turbine every hour describing its power generation and the sensor readings that are then used to predict and prevent component […]
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Just how should we share data on the Web?

The UK government is currently running a survey to elicit ideas on how it should update data.gov.uk. As one of the oldest such portals, despite various stages of evolution and upgrade, it is, unsurprisingly, showing signs of age. Yesterday’s blog post by Owen Boswarva offers a good summary of the kind of issues that arise […]
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Memento at the W3C

The W3C Wiki and the W3C specifications are now accessible using the Memento “Time Travel for the Web” protocol. This is the result of a collaboration between the W3C, the Prototyping Team of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Web Science and Digital Library Research Group at Old Dominion University. The Memento protocol is […]
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