W3C

All posts by Wendy Seltzer

Introducing the W3C Strategy Funnel

W3C has a variety of mechanisms for listening to what the community thinks could make for good future Web standards. These include discussions with the Membership, discussions with other standards bodies, and the activities of thousands of engineers in nearly 300 community groups. There are lots of good ideas, and lately the strategy team in […]
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W3C announces antitrust guidance document

The W3C supports a community including more than 400 member organizations in developing Open Standards for the Open Web Platform. Many of these organizations are competitors in highly competitive markets. Others are researchers, consumers, and regulators. They come together in W3C Working Groups and Interest Groups to develop standards for interoperability: shared languages, formats, and APIs. The W3C Process supports this […]
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Privacy Bridges with Do Not Track

We welcome the inclusion of W3C’s Do Not Track specification among the “privacy bridges” proposed by an international group of privacy experts as structures to improve US-EU privacy cooperation. “Bridges” is an apt descriptor for W3C’s work on voluntary consensus technical standards, through which we aim to make the Web work for users, developers, and […]
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TPE to CR: Advancing the conversation about Web tracking preferences

W3C’s Tracking Protection Working Group today published the Candidate Recommendation of the Tracking Preference Expression (TPE) and calls for implementation and testing of the specification. Congratulations to the Working Group on this progress. Abstract: This specification defines the DNT request header field as an HTTP mechanism for expressing the user’s preference regarding tracking, an HTML […]
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W3C Updates General Document License

W3C announced today an update to liberalize its general document license. The updated license —applied today to all documents the W3C has published under its general document license— permits the creation of derivative works not for use as technical specifications, and the excerpting of Code Components under the W3C Software License. When writing Recommendations, we […]
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Strengthen Web Security on The Day We Fight Back

We see pervasive monitoring as an attack on the Web and its users. The Web is for everyone. The W3C community builds Web protocols and formats to enable individuals and groups to communicate with those they are trying to reach, and to protect those communications from eavesdropping of third parties. Vulnerabilities to pervasive surveillance threaten […]
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