W3C

Talks by W3C Speakers

Many in the W3C community — including staff, chairs, and Member representatives — present W3C work at conferences and other events. Below you will find a list some of the talks. All material is copyright of the author, except where otherwise noted.

Listing is based on the following search constraints:

  • Possible presentation dates: past few months and upcoming
  • Technology area: Web of Devices

November 2015

  • 2015-11-13 (13 NOV)
    Abstract:
    The W3C Multimodal Architecture is a standard for integrating components of a multimodal system into a smoothly coordinated application through the use of standard life-cycle events. SCXML, InkML, EMMA, JSON, etc are used within the Multimodal Architecture to manage various of modalities of interaction and represent the semantics of user inputs in a modality-independent fashion. Participants will learn how to use these standards to enhance existing applications with multimodality (e.g., typing, handwriting, speaking) using the Openstream's context-aware multimodal platform. Attendees can get hands-on with developing portable multimodal applications based on MMI Architecture.

December 2015

  • 2015-12-04 (4 DEC)

    Multimodal Interaction Standards at the World Wide Web Consortium

    by Deborah Dahl

    Relevant technology areas: Browsers and Other Agents and Web of Devices.

    Abstract:
    The W3C Multimodal Interaction Working Group has developed several standards that can be used to represent multimodal user inputs and system outputs. We will discuss three of them in this talk. Extensible Multimodal Annotation (EMMA) represents cross-modality metadata for user inputs and system outputs. Ink Markup Language (InkML) represents traces in electronic ink, for example, for applications such as handwriting or gesture recognition. Finally, Emotion Markup Language (EmotionML) can be used to represent emotions. We will describe these three standards, talk about how they interoperate (including a demo of EMMA and EmotionML), and discuss future directions.

February 2016

  • 2016-02-14 (14 FEB)
    Abstract:
    This tutorial will provide you with a good understanding of the many unique characteristics of non-Latin writing systems, and illustrate the problems involved in implementing such scripts in products. It does not provide detailed coding advice, but does provide the essential background information you need to understand the fundamental issues related to Unicode deployment, across a wide range of scripts. The tutorial goes beyond encoding issues to discuss characteristics related to input of ideographs, combining characters, context-dependent shape variation, text direction, vowel signs, ligatures, punctuation, wrapping and editing, font issues, sorting and indexing, keyboards, and more. The concepts are introduced through the use of examples from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic, Hebrew, Thai, Hindi/Tamil, Russian and Greek.

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