W3C

Results of Questionnaire WAI Curricula Dragonfly Review for Teaching Ideas

The results of this questionnaire are available to anybody. In addition, answers are sent to the following email addresses: dmontalvo@w3.org,shadi+EOsurvey@w3.org

This questionnaire was open from 2020-05-06 to 2020-05-14.

3 answers have been received.

Jump to results for question:

  1. Review level
  2. Module 1: Page Structure
  3. How to teach accessibility tree
  4. Module 2: Navigation and Menus
  5. Module 3: Images and Graphics
  6. Notions about types of images for a developer
  7. Module 4: Tables
  8. Module 5: Forms
  9. Additional comments

1. Review level

What level of review did you do?

Summary

ChoiceAll responders
Results
I thoroughly reviewed the materials. 2
I skimmed them.
I need more time and will review by the date provided below.
I didn't get to it and will not in the near future. I abstain from providing comment.

(1 response didn't contain an answer to this question)

Details

Responder Review level
Howard Kramer I thoroughly reviewed the materials.
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins I thoroughly reviewed the materials.

2. Module 1: Page Structure

Please focus on teaching ideas for:

  • Do you think current teaching ideas are enough to cover existing learning outcomes?
  • What do you think is missing?
  • What do you think could be improved?

Please comment below or leave a GitHub Issue indicating the module and/or topic that the issue applies to.

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer It seemed the current teaching ideas were sufficient to cover the learning outcomes. Maybe out of scope for the question was that I thought there should be more links to existing resources, for example, under "Skills required for this module."

For Teaching Ideas for the first part might have students use a screenreader emulator or a screenreader. Suggesting other type of emulators, such as ones for color blindness, etc., might help.
Shadi Abou-Zahra #1. (Minor) There seems to be a mismatch between the module-level learning outcome "Understand how different assistive technology users orient and navigate web pages", which seems to focus on users of assistive technologies, and the topic "Different Ways of Interacting with a Web Page", which seems to address all users with disability. Seems like the module-level learning outcome should be expanded accordingly, to something like "Understand how different users orient and navigate web pages" (ie. remove "assistive technology" from the sentence).

#2. (Major) I'm wondering how generic or abstract the topic "Different Ways of Interacting with a Web Page" is, and how much of that would be taught in the Introduction curriculum. Either this will be fairly basic and is more appropriate for the Introduction curriculum, or it will be a fairly dry in-depth training to assistive technologies and adaptive strategies. I'm wondering if it is better to learn the specific aspects of assistive technologies and adaptive strategies in conjunction with the corresponding accessibility feature. For example, to learn about the screen reader keystrokes for moving through headings in the context of teaching headings structure rather than in absence of a specific context.

#3. (Major) I feel that the "Semantics and Structure" topic lumps everything together and does not really add much. In particular, the teaching ideas seem to be expansion of the learning outcomes but do not really provide specific ideas. I'm wondering if this topic should be broken out into smaller pieces. For example, one topic to focus specifically on "Marking up page sections". There the learning outcomes would be things like "Identifying the semantic role of different page regions", "Listing the WCAG success criteria associated with this feature", "Using native HTML5 elements to identify different page regions", and "Using WAI-ARIA semantics to identify different page regions" (maybe other learning outcomes too). The teaching ideas could include things like "trying to identify different page regions using a screen reader on random web pages, and discussing the findings", "comparing the structure of different page layouts and discussing the pros and cons of each approach", and "improving the structure of a web page they find in the wild, or discuss why the structure is already sufficient".
Estella Oncins

3. How to teach accessibility tree

Please focus on Teaching ideas for topic "Semantics and Structure"

Currently, there is a lerning outcome that says:

Describe main accessibility properties and how they are communicated by assistive technologies.

And a teaching idea that says:

Introduce accessibility properties such as name, role, and value. Explain that these are used by assistive technologies to communicate what the name of the element is, what it is for, and what its current status is (if any). Later modules will expand on how to add, remove, or alter accessibility properties of an object for non-standard or complex widgets.

This idea intends to build foundations on future modules for what is currently called advanced developer curriculum.

  • Do you think mentioning the accessibility tree is appropriate in this context?
  • Do you think it is too early in the process?
  • How could we better introduce the accessibility tree and accessibility properties

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer I think the term "accessibility tree" will throw people if it's not explained. Need to either explain it or leave it for later.

Again, perhaps out of scope, I thought the assessment for this module could be improved.
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins Maybe a hands-on approach so students can experience the problem themselves.

4. Module 2: Navigation and Menus

Please focus on teaching ideas for:

  • Do you think current teaching ideas are enough to cover existing learning outcomes?
  • What do you think is missing?
  • What do you think could be improved?

Please comment below or leave a GitHub Issue indicating the module and/or topic that the issue applies to.

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer More or less I would answer to the first question.
Perhaps links to some examples when suggesting use of ARIA tags such as aria-haspopup or aria-expanded. I think more guidance may be needed.

Wasn't sure about the usefulness of this practice, especially the removal of images:
Practice — Students disable images and CSS to navigate a given menu. Assess how students identify missing information and provide it using clear text or text alternatives.
Maybe it would be better to show students different types of navigation menus and different types of in-page navigation.
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins Maybe a hands-on approach so students can experience the problem themselves.

5. Module 3: Images and Graphics

Please focus on teaching ideas for:

  • Do you think current teaching ideas are enough to cover existing learning outcomes?
  • What do you think is missing?
  • What do you think could be improved?

Please comment below or leave a GitHub Issue indicating the module and/or topic that the issue applies to.

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer I thought these learning outcomes were not clear:
Specific keystrokes or functions to access text alternatives.
Better image indexing and ranking of images with the information in their alternative texts.

The practice:
Practice — Students are shown image buttons or links without text alternatives and are asked to provide them. Assess how students provide adequate alternative texts for some specific types of images.
might be better is it is specifically mentioned to refer to the images tutorial, to have to identify the type of each image and then provide the alternative text. And why focus only on image buttons or links? What about other types of image?

Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins Even if it is a curricula for developers I would encourage students to provide an alternative text for an image under "Explain that alternative texts are a WCAG requirement under success criterion 1.1.1 Non-text Content"

6. Notions about types of images for a developer

In learning outcomes for module "Images and Graphics" topic "Including Images in Websites" we had:

List some types of images from an accessibility perspective. For example, informative, functional, text, complex, and decorative images

The teaching idea associated to this learning outcome is:

Introduce the different types of images and provide examples for each of them. For reference, see the pages for image types at Images tutorial

Asking a developer to "Distinguish" the different types of images may be too much of an overlap, especially since we plan to develop further curricula for designers and content authors (where this distinction falls under). However, some notions that not all images are the same and that there are different ways to describe an image (or not describe it at all) may be needed in this context as a developer may sometimes be asked to provide descriptions for images that content authors failed to provide.

  • Do you agree with this approach?
  • Do you think we should get into more details about the types of images in this curriculum?
  • Do you have further suggestions?

Details

Responder
Howard Kramer This kind of addresses my questions above. I think we should get more into the details about the types of images.
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins I can not access the link

7. Module 4: Tables

Please focus on teaching ideas for:

  • Do you think current teaching ideas are enough to cover existing learning outcomes?
  • What do you think is missing?
  • What do you think could be improved?

Please comment below or leave a GitHub Issue indicating the module and/or topic that the issue applies to.

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins

8. Module 5: Forms

Please focus on teaching ideas for:

  • Do you think current teaching ideas are enough to cover existing learning outcomes?
  • What do you think is missing?
  • What do you think could be improved?

Please comment below or leave a GitHub Issue indicating the module and/or topic that the issue applies to.

Details

Responder Comments
Howard Kramer
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins

9. Additional comments

Use the space below to include any additional observations or concerns you would like to see addressed at this stage.

Details

Responder Additional Comments
Howard Kramer Sorry - ran out of time for 9 & 10.
Shadi Abou-Zahra
Estella Oncins Really good job.
Some practical exercises might be good so students can experience the problems but I leave it to editor's discretion

More details on responses

Non-responders

The following persons have not answered the questionnaire:

  1. Judy Brewer
  2. Eric Velleman
  3. Andrew Arch
  4. Shawn Henry
  5. Sylvie Duchateau
  6. Kazuhito Kidachi
  7. Sharron Rush
  8. Dónal Fitzpatrick
  9. David Sloan
  10. Mary Jo Mueller
  11. Vicki Menezes Miller
  12. Reinaldo Ferraz
  13. Vivienne Conway
  14. Bill Kasdorf
  15. Jan McSorley
  16. Cristina Mussinelli
  17. Brent Bakken
  18. Kevin Rydberg
  19. Adina Halter
  20. Denis Boudreau
  21. Laura Keen
  22. Sarah Pulis
  23. Kris Anne Kinney
  24. Bill Tyler
  25. Gregorio Pellegrino
  26. Amanda Mace
  27. Ian Smith
  28. Ruoxi Ran
  29. Jennifer Chadwick
  30. Carlos Duarte
  31. Sean Kelly
  32. Muhammad Saleem
  33. Sarah Lewthwaite
  34. Lewis Phillips
  35. Ash Harris
  36. Kim Hodges
  37. Isaac Durazo
  38. Daniel Montalvo
  39. Hidde de Vries
  40. Kevin White
  41. Mark Palmer
  42. Omar Bonilla
  43. Jade Matos Carew
  44. Sonsoles López Pernas
  45. Greta Krafsig
  46. Dónal Rice
  47. Gerhard Nussbaum
  48. Jason McKee
  49. Valentina Kirinić
  50. Roberto Perez
  51. Letícia Seixas Pereira
  52. Jayne Schurick
  53. Donna Bungard
  54. Vijaya Gowri Perumal
  55. Billie Johnston
  56. Emily Lewis
  57. Michele Williams
  58. Mark McCallum

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