W3C WBS Home

Results of Questionnaire Images Tutorial Review - August 2013

The results of this questionnaire are available to anybody. In addition, answers are sent to the following email address: bim@w3.org

This questionnaire was open from 2013-08-19 to 2013-09-19.

14 answers have been received.

Jump to results for question:

  1. Support for publishing the Images Tutorial
  2. Image concepts
  3. Functional images
  4. Images of text
  5. Informative images
  6. Complex images
  7. Groups of images
  8. Image maps
  9. Decorative images
  10. Tips and Frequently asked questions
  11. Overall

1. Support for publishing the Images Tutorial

Note that as a "WAI Resource" (as opposed to a W3C TR/Recommendation/Note), we can make changes quickly if needed later -- with only Working Group approval, we do not need a public review period for this.

Summary

ChoiceAll responders
Results
I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages as they are 4
I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion) 9
I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages only with the changes in the comments sections below
I do not support publishing these Images Tutorial pages, because of the comments in the comments sections below
I abstain (not vote)

(1 response didn't contain an answer to this question)

Details

Responder Support for publishing the Images Tutorial
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Sharron Rush I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Sylvie Duchateau I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Anna Belle Leiserson I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages as they are
Vicki Menezes Miller I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Howard Kramer I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Andrew Arch I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Denis Boudreau I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Helle Bjarnø I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages as they are
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages as they are
Suzette Keith I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Ian Pouncey I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages; however, I suggest the changes in the comments sections below (for editors' discretion)
Paul Schantz I support publishing these Images Tutorial pages as they are

2. Image concepts

Image concepts
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Image concepts
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion:
Functional images “carry out an action” is not quite accurate because they don’t carry it out without user interaction. Suggest “Functional images allow user interaction that causes a change in content or context” or something like that.
Sylvie Duchateau 1. [Important before publication]
Location: First sentence after heading level 1.
Current wording: "Every image needs to have a text alternative - text that provides an equivalent alternative to the image, by describing the information or function represented."
Suggested revision: add something telling the reader that tje explanation why every image needs a text alternative can be found further in the document.
Rationale: I wonder if people who don't know how important it is to add a text alternative to an image will read the rest of the document and have the patience to get to the paragraph: "why is this important".

2. In "why is this important, two first bullets after "Accessible images are beneficial in many situations such as for:"
Current wording: "People using screen readers: The text alternative can be read aloud or rendered as Braille;" and "People and websites using software that reads web pages aloud: The text alternative can be read aloud;"
Suggested revision: mix both bullets or make them clearer.
Rationale: For someone who does not know web accessibility, it man not be easy to understand the difference between images read by screen readers or software that read web pages aloud.
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller Importance: Relatively high for consideration

Very first sentence:

"Every image needs to have a text alternative - text that provides an equivalent alternative to the image, by describing the information or function represented."

I think the first sentence could mislead the group of people who are new to accessibility in the sense that they may not read until "decorative" images and simply enter a text alternative to describe the image. I've seen this in too many sincere efforts to implement accessibility.

I would prefer to be more clear upfront since I fear a number of users may not read until the end, i.e, until "decorative" images.

Suggested text:

Every image needs careful consideration as to its purpose. A text alternative must be provided to describe the information or function represented by an image. If an image is decorative, it should be considered as described in the list below. etc. as is.
Howard Kramer priority: medium - for editors' discretion
location: list right after heading "Image Concepts"
Note: I sent my suggested changes to wai-eo-editors@w3.org but on further thought it goes beyond copy editing so I'll include here.
current wording:
Functional images: Used alone as a link or button to activate a function, typically icons for printing and submitting forms - the text alternative needs to describe the function rather than the image;
Images of text: Representations of readable text, typically used when special fonts are wanted - the text alternative needs to contain the same words as shown in the image;
Informative images: Used to graphically illustrate concepts and information, typically pictures and illustrations - the text alternative needs to be at least a short description conveying the essential information presented by the image;
Complex images (such as graphs and diagrams): Used to convey data and detailed information - the alternative needs to be a full text equivalent of the data and information represented in the image;
Groups of images: Where a collection of images is used to convey a single piece of information - the text alternative for one item is used to convey the information conveyed by the entire group;
Image maps: Where one image is used to contain multiple clickable areas - the text alternative for the image as a whole should provide an overall context for the links, while text alternatives for the clickable areas need to describe the purpose or destination of the links;
Decorative images: Used purely for decorative purposes and do not convey any unique information - the text alternative needs to be null (alt="");

suggested revision:
• Functional images: Used alone as a link or button to activate a function – for example, icons for printing and submitting forms. The text alternative needs to describe the function rather than the image;
• Images of text: Representations of readable text, typically used when special fonts are wanted. The text alternative needs to contain the same words as shown in the image;
• Informative images: Used to graphically illustrate concepts and information, typically pictures and illustrations. The text alternative needs to be at least a short description conveying the essential information presented by the image;
• Complex images (such as graphs and diagrams): Used to convey data and detailed information. The alternative needs to be a full text equivalent of the data and information represented in the image;
• Groups of images: When a collection of images is used to convey a single piece of information, the text alternative for one item should convey the information conveyed by the entire group;
• Image maps: When one image is used to contain multiple clickable areas, the text alternative for the image as a whole should provide an overall context for the links, while text alternatives for the clickable areas need to describe the purpose or destination of the links;
• Decorative images: Used purely for decorative purposes and do not convey any unique information. The text alternative should be null (alt="");
rationale: The use of hyphens, dependent clauses and no periods was a bit confusing – I wasn’t sure where phrases stopped or continued and sometimes wasn’t sure when a dependent clause was merely a complete sentence.

priority: medium - for editors' discretion
location: 2nd bullet item under "why is this important"
current wording: People and websites using software that reads web pages aloud: The text alternative can be read aloud;

I'm just not sure what this means and how it differs from the 1st bullet item - individuals using screenreaders.
Andrew Arch Priority: strong suggestion for editors' discretion
Location: concept bullets (& menu)
Suggested revision: change the order to – decorative; informative; functional; text; complex; groups; image-maps
Rationale: reflects frequency of encounter (and partly complexity of solution)

Priority: medium suggestion for editor’s discretion
Location: Image of Text bullet
Revision: change text from [Representations of readable text, typically used when special fonts are wanted] to [Representations of readable text as images are sometimes used when special fonts are required (but should not generally be used unless part of a logo – the text should be styled real text whenever possible)].
Rationale: Suggestion to reword (or something similar) to discourage the use of images of text – urgent text makes it sound as though it’s ok to use these image types.

Location: Why is this important section
Priority: low suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [Images are used extensively on websites so they create major barriers] to [Images are used extensively on websites and can create major barriers]
Rationale: Images don’t have to ‘always’ create ‘major’ barriers – this is what is currently implied

Location: ??
Priority: for editor’s discretion
add a note about reading a page aloud to someone, e.g. over the phone or on a radio show, and what would the reader say about the images – gives an initial idea about to what should be in the alternative text
Denis Boudreau No comments.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey
Paul Schantz OK as-is

3. Functional images

Functional images
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Functional images
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion
1. See comment in previous item #3
2. Suggest to add the instruction for functional images adjacent to link text that has the same function. The recommendation is to wrap the text and the functional image into a single anchor tag and then use alt=”” on the image to avoid a user having to hear the same link twice. The technique is shown in decorative images later on, but should also be referenced here, in my opinion.

Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller Minor suggestion (not important):
Instead of:

"Functional images are those that carry out an action,..."
suggested text:
"Functional images are those images which serve the purpose of carrying out an action..."
Howard Kramer priority: medium - for editors' discretion
location: 1st paragraph
current wording: For example the text alternative should be "print" rather than "image of a printer" and "search" rather than "magnifying lens".
suggested revision: As shown in example 2 and 4 below, an image of a printer or magnifying glass, when conveying functions of "print" and "search", respectively, should have a text alternative of "print" rather than "image of a printer" and "search" rather than "magnifying lens".
rationale: there's no context or referent to the current phrasing. Should an image of a printer always have an alt text of "print." There's no qualifier.
Andrew Arch Location: opening para
Priority: low for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [ For example the text alternative should be "print" rather than "image of a printer" and "search" rather than "magnifying lens".] to [ For example the text alternative should be "print" rather than "image of a printer" and "search" rather than "magnifying lens" for associated action buttons and “ACME home page” rather “ACME logo” for a linked image.]
Rationale: gives more context plus adds another example (and, yes I note it is the first example below, but adds breadth for people who only read the opening para.

Location: somewhere
Priority: Medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: add an example (or at least a note) about the situation where an image is a link and adjacent to a text link
Rationale: This is covered elsewhere as I recall, but should also be covered (or cross-referenced) here under functional images

Location: Example 3
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [It has the text alternative "opens in new window"] to [It has the text alternative "new window"]
Rationale: reduces verbiage (terse messages of this nature are preferred by people in my experience)
Denis Boudreau I wish the 2nd example (Icon image that has a function) would have a alt that instead read "Print this page" and not just "Print" just so the description of the function would be clearer.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith Discretion: "Example 3: Icon image within link text" this is an important stumbling block. I wonder if the example should be split into two. One regular use of an image as link and one (as in example provided) dealing with image link opening in new tab/window? This would more readily allow an inexperienced user to simple copy the code snippet.
Ian Pouncey The rule for functional images is to define the call to action text first, then decide on an image that represents it. Usually this is done the other way round, which is why we have so many odd examples on the web.
Paul Schantz OK as-is

4. Images of text

Images of text
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Images of text
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion to provide edits for this sentence:.
“Wherever possible you should always use styled text instead because images of text cannot be resized without losing clarity and the background and text colors can't be changed to suit users' reading preferences.”

Edited version:
The strongest design technique is to use actual text - styled with CSS - rather than image-based text presentation. This is because actual text is flexible, it can be resized without losing clarity and the background and text colors can be modified to suit users' reading preferences. Images are more likely to distort and pixelate when resized. In those uncommon situations where images of text must be used...(etc)
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer priority: mild - for editors' discretion (more like I'm thinking out loud
location: last block - Math ML
not a wording issue. Just wondered if there might be a link to a greater explanation of the code (but I'm on the fence on this)
rationale: I have no working knowledge of MathML so I wasn't sure I quite followed the code.
This section looks great.
Andrew Arch Location: Example 2
Priority: strong suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: change the case of “Initiative” to “initiative” in the text and the code to reflect the actual way the word is used in the logo/image
Rationale: alt text should be an accurate representation of image text

Location: Example 1
Priority: ??
Revision: can the style and angle of the text not be done with a custom font and CSS3 is supporting browsers?
Rationale: I thought CSS was capable of this now – but I’m no expert

Location: Related WCAG 2 techniques
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: consider adding other techniques associated with SC 1.4.5
Rationale: rounds out the explanations better
Denis Boudreau I am wondering if it would be a god thing to mention the benefit of
actually adding punctuation to alt attribute values so screen readers
and other ATs actually make a short pause before following up with the next piece of content (this is especially useful if an informative image is part of a paragraph with some regular text).
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey In example 3 I worry that someone might think that this is how you should describe all images of mathematical expressions, including both the meaning and a description of the notation. I don't think that's what you intend, rather this is an example of content that describes the notation and therefore makes the extended description appropriate, but because the Math ML does not include the further information it may be seen as something that is required in all image representations of expressions.
Paul Schantz Suggestion for editor's discretion: most text styles actually CAN be achieved with advanced CSS styling, notwithstanding browser support. However, for the purposes of this tutorial that is probably not relevant ("advanced" being the key word).

5. Informative images

Informative images
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Informative images
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion, related to linked image adjacent linked text discussed previously:

Example 5: Note 1. Some screen readers will read source code if a functional image is given alt=””. My recommendation is to include an instruction that includes a link to the technique suggested in functional images about the use of a single anchor tag to contain both the text and the image link.
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer No suggestions - looks fantastic!
Andrew Arch Location: Example 3
Priority: strong suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: drop the alternative text entirely and amend the adjacent text to read [Turn anti-clockwise (right to left) to unscrew the cap.] and add the ‘real’ text into the code snippet
Rationale: helps everyone understand (helps people who understand text better than pictures; reinforces the message for others), and reduces repetitiveness for screen reader users

Location: Example 5
Priority: medium suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: explain the spacing in the alternative text between the quotes
Rationale: readers who don’t understand the finer points of a screen reader may suspect it’s a typo and leave it out, but in fact it’s there (as I understand) to separate he words, e.g. ‘Word format’ from the following ‘(‘

Location: Example 1
Priority: low suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [alt="Telephone number: "] to [alt="Telephone: "] and [alt="Fax number: "] to [alt="Fax: "]
Rationale: tersify – it’s obvious that the following numerical characters are a number, no need to say so 

Denis Boudreau Besides missing images, nothing to change. Example 5 requires a space between the words "and" and "PDF".
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey A bit of an edge case, but there are a number of cognitive disabilities that make recognising facial expressions difficult. This could be a good place to talk about captioning of images.
Paul Schantz Suggestion for editor's discretion:

Example 3: Image conveying succinct information: should "anti-clockwise" be "counter-clockwise"?

6. Complex images

Complex images
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Complex images
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Good, no comments
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer priority: medium - for editors' discretion
location: last block - "approach 4". 2nd sentence under the heading.
current wording: "The long description is explicitly associated to the image by using role="group" on the containing figure element.
suggested revision: "The long description, presented in the paragraph tag, is explicitly associated to the image by using role="group" on the containing figure element.
rationale: it took me a while to figure out where the longdesc, or the equivalent of the longdesc, was located in the <figure> coding.
Andrew Arch Location: ??
Priority: Strong suggestion for editor’s discretion
Revision: Add a new bullet point in the intro [Maps showing locations or other information such as weather systems] and add an example (or 2) involving maps, e.g. for location, directions, spatial distribution, etc. Many location maps for organisation offices are adjacent to the text of the address, so job done (alt=””), others give direction like google maps, but again there is a text description giving turn-by-turn instructions (so simple alt text is all that is required). For spatial distribution, a more detailed description is required, more akin to the provided Example 1.
Rationale: complex images are more than just graphs and diagrams

Location: Example 1 image
Priority: editor’s discretion
Revision: image contains the graph title – need to explain that this would be provided as text
Rationale: I showed the page to several people and they all assumed the title (2013 first quarter visitors …) was part of the image that required alternative text.

Location: Example 1
Priority: strong for editor’s discretion
Revision: 1. change the order of the approaches described - 1 should be later; 3 should be first.
Rationale: Approach 1 recommending longdesc is not supported by NVDA in firefox and not yet supported for non-screen reader users. Therefore it's an approach that does not work and should not be listed as the number one approach. It could be listed as a future technology. Approach 3 should be listed as the number one approach as it's the simplest and best supported.

Location: Example 1
Priority: strong for editor’s discretion
Revision: In Approach 4, include the phrase " - described below" in the alt text.
Rationale: the HTML5 <figure> element is not fully supported. By including this phrase, the markup works in the same way as Approach 3, so it doesn't matter if the <figure> is not supported.

Location: Example 1
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: add a note to Approach 2 that explain the broader benefits of providing access to this information for all
Rationale: helps get the rationale for the approach across
Denis Boudreau Approach 2 - I'm really not convinced that I like the use of the BR element in the example. Do we really need to use it? Why not use CSS instead or make it two different elements?

Approach 3 example - please provide punctuation at the end of the alt
value as well.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick There is an option that does not include a long description element. Namely, include a full description in the regular text for everyone. This is often a good approach since the significance of an image often needs explanation for all readers. In this case no special long description in needed. This can be better because it is not a separate addition for people with disabilities. Separate additions are often inferior because they require extra work.
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey You could use the HTML 5 <figcaption> element as a second example for approach 4. To include it with a table, which has its own <caption> could be a bit confusing though.
Paul Schantz OK as-is.

7. Groups of images

Groups of images
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Groups of images
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Good no comments
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer priority: mild - for editors' discretion
location: 1st paragraph
current wording: "For example the descriptive text alternative on one image should be "4 out of 5 stars", rather than "1 star" or Half star" on each image."
suggested revision: As shown in example 1 below, an image of 3 and 1/2 filled stars out of 5 should be "3 1/2 out of 5 stars", rather than "1 star" or "Half star" or "unfilled star" on each image."
rationale: as per my comment above on functional images, there's no context or referent to the current phrasing. With the 3.5 star example visible just below this paragraph you at first assume the comment refers to that image - which it doesn't.
Andrew Arch Location: Example 1
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: Either change the alt text from [ "Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars"] to [ "3.5 out of 5 stars"], or add the word ‘rating’ as text before the stars and use the shortened alt text
Rationale: tersify or clarify – sighted aren’t told this is a rating system – some of us might need that explanation too :)
Denis Boudreau I don't think groups of images happen so often I would change "A grouped collection of images is often used to convey a single piece of
information" to "A grouped collection of images is sometimes used to
convey a single piece of information".
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey
Paul Schantz OK as-is.

8. Image maps

Image maps
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Image maps
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion
First sentence: suggested change from
“...that carry out actions, such as provide links to other pages.”
to language more aligned with previous lesson.
Perhaps “...that have interactive purpose, as described in functional images.”
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer priority: medium - for editors' discretion
location: 2nd paragraph, second sentence
current wording: The text alternative for the image is "Board of Directors: "
suggested revision: The text alternative for the image is "Board of Directors and related staff: "
rationale: either the one person who is not a chair or a director should be included in overall description or it should be explained why they are not - otherwise, it's a little confusing. I hope the following doesn't seem nitpicky but something else which I think made this confusing is that this does not look like a board of directors, it looks like and organizational chart. Boards of directors usually do not have job titles. I mention this only because I think it adds to the confusion.
Andrew Arch Location: Example 1 note
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: I presume the suggestion in the note can be implemented?
Rationale: If so, we should provide hints about how to do it (or a full code example)
Denis Boudreau No comments.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey
Paul Schantz OK as-is.

9. Decorative images

Decorative images
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Decorative images
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo I think the example 3 is not a good example of decorative image, as it is a photo of a concrete being with its own name. Since the image carries a null alt, the screen reader user will not be warned of their presence and therefore will not understand what is the text that appears as a photo caption for those who can see.
In addition, an image that deserves a caption, is of sufficient importance to merit information detected by a screen reader.
I see no reason to include a picture with caption and does not have a corresponding alt text. Recall that the attribute "alt" and the caption serve different functions.
What we have to do is write the correct "alt" and the caption, so they are not exactly alike.
Sharron Rush Editor's discretion:
Example 2: May want to more fully emphasize the fact that linked images can only be successfully assigned empty alt text when wrapped in the same anchor with the link text. (Related to previous comments in #4 and #6)
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
Howard Kramer No comment except: "What a cute dog - arrrh"
Andrew Arch Location: opening para
Priority: low for editor’s discretion
Revision: in addition to [a null (empty)alt text needs to be provided (alt="") so that they can be ignored by assistive technologies such as screen readers], consider adding a note of some sort along the lines of “if the alt attribute is not included (even though empty) many screen readers will announce the image’s file name”
Rationale: adds explanation - some may wonder why the null alt text is needed

Location: example 4
Priority: low for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [This image is used to add ambience to the page] to [This image is used to add ambience or visual interest to the page]
Rationale: add additional explanation and rationale for null alt text

Denis Boudreau Example 3 - I'm really not convinced that I like the use of the BR element in the example. Do we really need to use it? Why not use CSS instead or make it two different elements?
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith Discretion: Discussions within EOWG seem to suggest that this option can readily be used for most images. Should this be clarified that many images on a typcial webpage are in fact only decorative? Maybe this could be address in the FAQ's.
Ian Pouncey In example 2 you might consider adding in REALLY BIG LETTERS that links must have some content. It's still one of the most common problems I see, images used as link content with empty or null alt text, and no other text. I also see the advice to move decorative images to CSS followed at the same time, resulting in links with no content at all, just a background image. </rant>
Paul Schantz OK as-is.

10. Tips and Frequently asked questions

Tips and Frequently asked questions
For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Tips and Frequently asked questions
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Tips and FAQs seem incomplete, but I do not have suggestions for additions at this time. Will work on it.
There is a typo in "welcom" it is missing the final e
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson
Vicki Menezes Miller
I think this could be populated a bit more but we could do that later.

One point at the sentence:
"It should be null (empty) alt text (alt=""). "
I would add after (alt="", i.e. no space between the inverted commas").
Rationale: all too often, users add the space.
Howard Kramer priority: mile - for editors' discretion
location: all faq paragraphs - I would add a little line spacing between each question & answer, for readability.
Andrew Arch Location: FAQ bullet 2
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [I can't remember if a description is not needed, should the alt be a space or null (empty)?] to [I can't remember - should the alt be a space or null (empty) if a description is not needed?]
Rationale: reads more cleanly

Location: FAQ bullet 2
Priority: low for editor’s discretion
What’s the difference between [] and []? Do the latest screen readers announce ‘image’ if there is a space but not if the alt text is null? If so, then explain this.

Location: FAQ bullet 3
Priority: low for editor’s discretion
Revision: change [but it's probably best to avoid the more generic terms] to [but it is best to avoid the more generic terms] in the last sentence
Rationale: drop ‘probably’ as people are looking to W3C for definitive advice, so let’s not beat about the bush with ‘probably’!

Location: FAQ bullet 4
Priority: medium for editor’s discretion
Do some screen readers still truncate long alt text? If so, then let’s say so and give the number of characters.
Denis Boudreau MAybe add the note about punctuating alt attribute values here? Also, I often meet people who think the character limit on a alt is 150, not 90. In both cases, the myth needs to be debunked, but maybe the question should reflect that.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith
Ian Pouncey
Paul Schantz OK as-is.

11. Overall

Overall. Note that we plan to polish the visual design. Feel free to comment on the navigation structure, usability, and such.

For each comment, remember to indicate if it is a suggestion for editor's discretion or if you feel it must be addressed before this version is published.

Details

Responder Overall
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo
Sharron Rush Overall, it is a concise and useful resource. Well done!
Sylvie Duchateau
Anna Belle Leiserson Visual polishing aside, I really like the way the left navigation works. Bravo!
Vicki Menezes Miller Bravo! Really useful tutorial.
I like the navigation structure.
I think it's simple and easy to use and understand.
Howard Kramer Still feel the next and previous links should be more prominent - conveyed via a linked image (editor's discretion).
Great content and writing.
Andrew Arch Priority: strong suggestion for editors' discretion
Location: LHS menu)
Suggested revision: change the order to – decorative; informative; functional; text; complex; groups; image-maps
Rationale: reflects frequency of encounter (and partly complexity of solution)
Denis Boudreau Awesome work.
Helle Bjarnø
Shawn Henry
Wayne Dick
Suzette Keith I really like the style of writing, and the examples with code snippets. I think this clarifies many common issues in a way that is easy to comprehend.
Ian Pouncey I think it is fine as it is, but there are a few additional examples that could be used along with some clarifying text.
Paul Schantz Navigation structure and usability are excellent. Apart from the polish (especially the background on the >>) , I wouldn't change a thing.

More details on responses


Compact view of the results / list of email addresses of the responders

WBS home / Questionnaires / WG questionnaires / Answer this questionnaire


Maintained by Laurent Carcone, from a development by Dominique Hazaël-Massieux (dom@w3.org) on an original design by Michael Sperberg-McQueen $Id: showv.php3,v 1.127 2015-02-04 08:52:34 carcone Exp $. Please send bug reports and request for enhancements to lcarcone@w3.org with w3t-sys@w3.org copied (if your mail client supports it, send mail directly to the right persons)