W3C

XBL Current Status

This page summarizes the relationships among specifications, whether they are finished standards or drafts. Below, each title links to the most recent version of a document.

Completed Work

W3C Recommendations have been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and are endorsed by the Director as Web Standards. Learn more about the W3C Recommendation Track.

Group Notes are not standards and do not have the same level of W3C endorsement.

Group Notes

2012-05-24

XBL 2.0

The XML Binding Language (XBL) describes the ability to associate elements in a document with script, event handlers, CSS, and more complex content models, which can be stored in another document. This can be used to re-order and wrap content so that, for instance, simple HTML or XHTML markup can have complex CSS styles applied without requiring that the markup be polluted with multiple semantically neutral div elements.

It can also be used to implement new DOM interfaces, and, in conjunction with other specifications, enables arbitrary tag sets to be implemented as widgets. For example, XBL could be used to implement the form controls in XForms or HTML.

Drafts

Below are draft documents: other Working Drafts . Some of these may become Web Standards through the W3C Recommendation Track process. Others may be published as Group Notes or become obsolete specifications.

Other Working Drafts

2007-07-18

XBL 2.0 Primer: An Introduction for Developers

This practical guide provides you with the knowledge required to effectively use the XML Binding Language 2.0. It introduces both the basic and advanced concepts of XBL and describes its syntax and scenarios that should be considered best-practice. It also describes the purpose of the language elements described in the XBL 2.0 specification.

XBL describes the ability to associate elements in one document with script, event handlers, styles, and more complex content models in another document. You can use XBL to re-order and wrap content so that, for instance, simple HTML or XHTML markup can have complex CSS styles applied without requiring that the markup be polluted with multiple div elements. In addition, if you are a programmer, you can use XBL to implement new DOM interfaces, and, in conjunction with other specifications, it enables arbitrary XML tag sets to be treated as "widgets" (pluggable user interface components).