W3C

Web of Things Current Status

This page summarizes the relationships among specifications, whether they are finished standards or drafts. Below, each title links to the most recent version of a document.

Completed Work

W3C Recommendations have been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and are endorsed by the Director as Web Standards. Learn more about the W3C Recommendation Track.

Group Notes are not standards and do not have the same level of W3C endorsement.

Group Notes

2017-12-14

Web of Things (WoT) Security and Privacy Considerations

This document provides non-normative guidance on Web of Things (WoT) security and privacy. The Web of Things is descriptive, not prescriptive, and so is generally designed to support the security models and mechanisms of the systems it describes, not introduce new ones. However, a WoT system also has its own unique assets, such as a Scripting API and Thing Descriptions, that need to be protected and also have security and privacy implications.

Drafts

Below are draft documents: other Working Drafts . Some of these may become Web Standards through the W3C Recommendation Track process. Others may be published as Group Notes or become obsolete specifications.

Other Working Drafts

2017-09-14

Web of Things (WoT) Architecture

This document describes the abstract architecture for the W3C Web of Things. It is derived from a set of use cases and can be mapped onto a variety of concrete deployment scenarios, several examples of which are given.

2017-09-14

Web of Things (WoT) Thing Description

This document describes a formal model and common representation for a Web of Things (WoT) Thing Description. A Thing Description describes the metadata and interfaces of Things, where a Thing is an abstraction of a physical entity that provides interactions to and participates in the Web of Things.

2017-09-14

Web of Things (WoT) Scripting API

This document describes the abstract architecture for the W3C Web of Things. It is derived from a set of use cases and can be mapped onto a variety of concrete deployment scenarios, several examples of which are given.