ChangedElementStrong

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strong Element Has Been Changed

Issue: Justification for the "strong" element changed status.

Details: It now represents importance rather than strong emphasis

Rationale: Why the Change is Required

  1. Better reflects the way this element is used on the web or gives it a purpose so people can start using it.
  2. List Rationale
  3. List Rationale
  4. List Rationale
  5. Applicable Design Principles (proposed)
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle

Rationale: Why the Change is Not Required

  1. HTML5 is not changing s meaning: People emphasize things because they are important.
  2. exists; browsers will continue to support it. Allowing authors to continue to use it is not doing any harm.
  3. Changing its meaning (or adding a new element with a different meaning), as currently proposed by the draft causes a namespace collision.
  4. Particularly without versioning, it would be impossible to tell whether a document meant as in strong emphasis or as in important.
  5. Applicable Design Principles (proposed)
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle
    • Specific Principle

Rationale: Why It Should be Deprecated be Instead of of Changed

  1. With nested , and CSS (including media rules) is no longer a very useful element.
  2. With the use of a HTML5 supplemental CSS stylesheet the introduction of <important> would be just as compatible and degrade gracefully. Authors particularly concerned about losing styling of
<important> could use an embedded stylesheet.
  1. It doesn't seem to have much utility, being semantically hard to distinguish from . In most situations a single form of emphasis is sufficient (or indeed, for those that have a style guide, mandated). There are several plausible ways of choosing to render emphasized text (italicized, emboldened, capitalized, coloured), but with CSS any of these can be applied to , so a distinct element is not needed for each.

Advice From Authorities

Research

Examples

Use Cases

Policies, Guidelines, and Law

Related References

Related E-mail: July 2007

part of my review of 3.12 Phrase elements (importance element)