Accessibility By Roles - Analysis

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@@Editor's note: This document is a work in progress meant to be built collaboratively and commented by the WAI-Engage community. Every member of this community is welcomed to either send comments directly to the editor through email at dboudreau [at] accessibiliteweb [dot] com or by editing the content below using the wiki. In order to keep track of all modifications, please provide a summary of all the changes brought to the document within the wiki interface and check if this is a minor edit or not. Thank you. (dboudreau, 2012/04/13)


Applicable WCAG 2.0 Success Criteria

The analysis function covers the tasks normally associated with analysis of the project’s strategic orientations, analysis of the options for technology platforms, or functional analysis of Web interfaces.

Principles Applicable Success Criteria
A AA AAA
Perceivable -- -- --
Operable -- -- 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5
Understandable 3.2.1, 3.3.1 3.3.3, 3.3.4 3.3.5, 3.3.6
Robust -- -- --
Total (9) 2 2 5

Applicable Success Criteria by Principles

The applicable success criteria relevant to the Analysis role are organized by principles (perceivable, operable, understanding, robust) below.

Perceivable

No success criteria applicable for the Analysis role as of yet.

Operable

Success Criteria Description Specific Benefits Sufficient Techniques
2.2.3 No Timing (AAA) Timing is not an essential part of the event or activity presented by the content, except for non-interactive synchronized media and real-time events.
  • People with physical disabilities often need more time to react, to type and to complete activities. People with low vision need more time to locate things on screen and to read. People who are blind and using screen readers may need more time to understand screen layouts, to find information and to operate controls. People who have cognitive or language limitations need more time to read and to understand. People who are deaf and communicate in sign language may need more time to read information printed in text (which may be a second language for some).
  • In circumstances where a sign-language interpreter may be relating audio content to a user who is deaf, control over time limits is also important.
Techniques for SC 2.2.3
2.2.4 Interruptions (AAA) Interruptions can be postponed or suppressed by the user, except interruptions involving an emergency.
  • Individuals with attention deficit disorders can focus on content without distraction.
  • Individuals with low vision or who use screen readers will not have content updated while they are viewing it (which can lead to discontinuity and misunderstanding if they start reading in one topic and finish in another).
Techniques for SC 2.2.4
2.2.5 Re-authenticating (AAA) When an authenticated session expires, the user can continue the activity without loss of data after re-authenticating.
  • This Success Criterion benefits people who may require additional time to complete an activity. People with cognitive limitations may read slowly and require additional time to read and respond to a questionnaire. Users interacting via a screen reader may need extra time to navigate and complete a complicated form. A person with motor impairments or who navigates with an alternative input device may require additional time to navigate through or complete input within a form.
  • In circumstances where a sign-language interpreter may be relating audio content to a user who is deaf, control over time limits is also important.
Techniques for SC 2.2.5

Understandable

Success Criteria Description Specific Benefits Sufficient Techniques
3.2.1 On Focus (A) When any component receives focus, it does not initiate a change of context.
  • This Success Criterion helps people with visual disabilities, cognitive limitations, and motor impairments by reducing the chance that a change of context will occur unexpectedly.
Techniques for SC 3.2.1
3.3.1 Error Identification (A) If an input error is automatically detected, the item that is in error is identified and the error is described to the user in text.
  • Providing information about input errors in text allows users who are blind or colorblind to perceive the fact that an error occurred.
  • This Success Criterion may help people with cognitive, language, and learning disabilities who have difficulty understanding the meaning represented by icons and other visual cues.
Techniques for SC 3.3.1
3.3.3 Error Suggestion (AA) If an input error is automatically detected and suggestions for correction are known, then the suggestions are provided to the user, unless it would jeopardize the security or purpose of the content.
  • Providing information about how to correct input errors allows users who have learning disabilities to fill in a form successfully. Users who are blind or have impaired vision understand more easily the nature of the input error and how to correct it. People with motion impairment can reduce the number of times they need to change an input value.
Techniques for SC 3.3.3
3.3.4 Error Prevention (Legal, Financial, Data) (AA) For Web pages that cause legal commitments or financial transactions for the user to occur, that modify or delete user-controllable data in data storage systems, or that submit user test responses, at least one of the following is true:
  • Reversible: Submissions are reversible.
  • Checked: Data entered by the user is checked for input errors and the user is provided an opportunity to correct them.
  • Confirmed: A mechanism is available for reviewing, confirming, and correcting information before finalizing the submission.
  • Providing safeguards to avoid serious consequences resulting from mistakes helps users with all disabilities who may be more likely to make mistakes.
Techniques for SC 3.3.4
3.3.5 Help (AAA) Context-sensitive help is available.
  • Assistance for text input helps individuals with writing disabilities and people with reading and intellectual disabilities who often have difficulty writing text in forms or other places that need text input.
  • Additionally, these kinds of assistance help people who are aging and have the same difficulty in text input and/or mouse operation.
Techniques for SC 3.3.5
3.3.6 Error Prevention (All) (AAA) For Web pages that require the user to submit information, at least one of the following is true:
  • Reversible: Submissions are reversible.
  • Checked: Data entered by the user is checked for input errors and the user is provided an opportunity to correct them.
  • Confirmed: A mechanism is available for reviewing, confirming, and correcting information before finalizing the submission
  • Providing safeguards to avoid consequences resulting from mistakes helps users with all disabilities who may be more likely to make mistakes.
Techniques for SC 3.3.6

Robust

No success criteria applicable for the Analysis role as of yet.