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W3C Updates Recommendation Track Process

W3C enacted today the 1 August 2014 W3C Process Document. This revision updates the chapter that defines the Recommendation Track, the steps and requirements followed by W3C Working Groups to standardize Web technology. The W3C technical report development process is designed to support multiple specification development methodologies: maximize consensus about the content of stable technical reports; ensure high technical and editorial quality; promote consistency among specifications; facilitate royalty-free, interoperable implementations of Web Standards; and earn endorsement by W3C and the broader community. The primary change to the Recommendation Track is to merge “Last Call” and “Candidate Recommendation.” A Process Transition FAQ lists other changes to the Recommendation Track, explains the two-year transition plan for adoption by groups, describes the relation to the W3C Patent Policy, and more.

This document was developed between the W3C Advisory Board and the public Revising W3C Process Community Group.

New Privacy Policy for W3C Site

W3C today updated its privacy policy to reflect current technology and W3C practices. The policy does not make material changes to what W3C does with information resulting from visits to our site. If you have questions, please write to site-policy@w3.org.

Upcoming coordinated Workshop: Encouraging open data usage by commercial developers

W3C and its European host, ERCIM, announce the report from the first workshop in the Share-PSI 2.0 series. Share-PSI 2.0 is the European network for the exchange of experience and ideas around implementing open data policies in the public sector. It brings together government departments, standards bodies, academic institutions, commercial organisations, trade associations and interest groups to identify what does and doesn’t work, what is and isn’t practical, what can and can’t be expected of different stakeholders.

In the first workshop, held as part of the 5th Annual Samos Summit on ICT-enabled Governance, the focus was Uses of Open Data Within Government for Innovation and Efficiency. The report shows the many different strategies being adopted to foster a culture of data sharing across the public sector leading to significant efficiencies in operation, more effective delivery of the public task, reduced corruption and greater trust in important institutions like the police. From Helsinki to Athens via Dublin and Zagreb, from Oslo to Madrid via Tirana, Tenerife and Trentino – the public sector is making smarter use of the Web.

The Samos workshop also sets us up nicely for the next workshop in the series. Taking place in Lisbon in the first week in December, Encouraging open data usage by commercial developers will be highly interactive with many facilitated discussions and very few presentations.

W3C membership is not required to participate. The event is open to all, but all participants are required to submit a position paper or statement of interest by 5 October 2014. Share-PSI 2.0 is coordinated by W3C/ERCIM as part of the Data Activity and is closely aligned with the Data on the Web Best Practices Working Group.

CSS Ruby Layout Module Level 1 Draft Published

The Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group has published a Working Draft of CSS Ruby Layout Module Level 1. “Ruby”, a form of interlinear annotation, are short runs of text alongside the base text. They are typically used in East Asian documents to indicate pronunciation, or to provide a short annotation. This module describes the rendering model and formatting controls related to displaying ruby annotations in CSS. CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Learn more about the Style Activity.

W3C Invites Implementations of HTML5

The HTML Working Group invites implementation of the Candidate Recommendation of HTML5. This specification defines the 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). In this version, new features are introduced to help Web application authors, new elements are introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention has been given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability. Learn more about the HTML Activity.

For Review: Updated Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (WCAG WG) requests review of draft updates to Notes that accompany WCAG 2.0: Techniques for WCAG 2.0 (Editors’ Draft) and Understanding WCAG 2.0 (Editors’ Draft). Comments are welcome through 12 August 2014. (This is not an update to WCAG 2.0, which is a stable document.) To learn more about the updates, see the Call for Review: WCAG 2.0 Techniques Draft Updates e-mail. Read about the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI).

Developers Guide to Features of Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools Draft Published

The First Public Working Draft of Developers’ Guide to Features of Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools was published today by the Evaluation and Repair Tools Working Group (ERT WG). The document describes features that web authoring tools and quality assurance tools can incorporate to support web accessibility evaluation. It is useful for tool developers to get introductory guidance on these features, and is useful for people who want to compare tools, for example, during procurement. The document is intended to promote awareness of accessibility evaluation tool features and to encourage tool developers to include relevant features so that tools better support Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 conformance evaluation. Learn more about the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI).

W3C Training: HTML5 and Responsive Web Design

W3DevCampus Registration is now open for two new online courses from W3C:

  • HTML5 [Register]. This course runs for 6 weeks, starting 22 September 2014. In addition to a JS crash course, numerous interactive examples and an “animated monster” contest, this new edition gives an introduction on Web components.
  • Responsive Web Design [Register]. This course runs for 4 weeks starting 3 October 2014. This course focuses on best practices, accessibility and optimization.

An early bird rate is available for both courses until 24 August. Learn more about W3DevCampus, the official W3C online training for Web developers and watch the intro video.

First Draft of Mixed Content Published

The Web Application Security Working Group has published a First Public Working Draft of Mixed Content. This specification details how user agents can mitigate risks to security and privacy by limiting a resource???s ability to inadvertently communicate in the clear, or to expose non-public resources to the web at large. This specification describes how and why user agents disallow rendering and execution of content loaded over unencrypted or unauthenticated connections in the context of an encrypted and authenticated document. Learn more about the Security Activity.

W3C Launches Push for Social Web Application Interoperability

W3C today launched a new Social Activity to develop standards to make it easier to build and integrate social applications with the Open Web Platform. Future standards —including vocabularies for social applications, activity streams, embedded experiences and in-context actions, and protocols to federate social information such as status updates— will address use cases that range from social business applications, to cross-organization federation, to greater user control over personal data. Read the complete joint press release with OpenSocial Foundation.

W3C chartered two groups today to carry out these activities:

  • The Social Web Working Group will define the technical standards and APIs to facilitate access to social functionality as part of the Open Web Platform. These include a common JSON-based syntax for social data, a client-side API, and a Web protocol for federating social information such as status updates.
  • The Social Interest Group will co-ordinate messaging around social at the W3C and formulate a broad strategy to enable social business and federation. It will harvest use-cases and review specifications produced by technical working groups in the light of those use-cases.

The Social Web Working Group’s first face-to-face meeting will take place the last week of October, as part of TPAC 2014, W3C’s annual gathering of Working Groups.