First Drafts of “Annotation use cases” and “Requirements for Latin Text Layout and Pagination”

The Digital Publishing Interest Group has published two First Public Working Drafts:

W3C Invites Implementations of Compositing and Blending Level 1

The Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group and the SVG Working Group invite implementation of the Candidate Recommendation of Compositing and Blending Level 1. Compositing describes how shapes of different elements are combined into a single image. There are various possible approaches for compositing. Previous versions of SVG and CSS used Simple Alpha Compositing. In this model, each element is rendered into its own buffer and is then merged with its backdrop using the Porter Duff source-over operator. This specification will define a new compositing model that expands upon the Simple Alpha Compositing model by offering: additional Porter Duff compositing operators; advanced blending modes which allow control of how colors mix in the areas where shapes overlap; compositing groups. In addition, this specification will define CSS properties for blending and group isolation and the properties of the ‘globalcompositeoperation’ attribute as defined in HTML Canvas 2D Context, Level 2.

W3C Invites Implementations of CSS Syntax Module Level 3

The Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group invites implementation of the Candidate Recommendation of CSS Syntax Module Level 3. This module describes, in general terms, the basic structure and syntax of CSS stylesheets. It defines, in detail, the syntax and parsing of CSS – how to turn a stream of bytes into a meaningful stylesheet. CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc.

Upcoming Workshop on Web Annotations: Footnotes, comments, bookmarks, and marginalia on the Web

W3C announced a workshop on digital annotations for the Web, part of our ongoing effort on enhancing the Web experience.

Annotating is the act of creating associations between distinct pieces of information. Annotation is a ubiquitous activity online in many guises: comments on articles, footnotes, sticky notes, “hot spots” on images, timestamped notes on video or audio tracks, highlighted text passages in ebook readers, evocative pictures attached to song lyrics, quotes and links on social media, and even tagged bookmarks, are all forms of annotation. One of the most common and engaging Web activities for the average person is discussion of a document or piece of media.

Many projects and companies are now turning to annotations to solve a variety of issues with communication on the Web, and is of particular interest to the education, research, and digital publishing industries. To address these needs, W3C’s Web Annotations workshop will focus on identifying standardization priorities for chartering a potential Web Annotations Working Group, on such topics as:

  • Robust anchoring to dynamic third-party documents
  • Styling selections and annotations
  • Data models
  • Federation and syndication
  • Web storage and management of annotations
  • Client side APIs and methods for the implementation of annotation systems
  • Practical experience with annotation systems
  • Annotation of data

W3C membership is not required to participate. The event is open to all, but all participants are required to submit a position paper or statement of interest by 28 February 2014.

Draft charter for an annotation group at W3C

W3C has published a draft charter for a possible Annotation Working Group. The mission of the Group, which may be proposed to be added to the Digital Publishing Activity, is to define a generic data model for annotations, and define the basic infrastructural elements to make it deployable in browsers and reading systems.

The goal of this draft is to provide a framework for a public discussion on the creation of group. Community perspectives on the scope of this proposed charter at a Workshop on Annotation that W3C organizes in April, co-located with the I Annotate conference in San Francisco. The current plan is to finalize the charter soon after that event. Once the charter is finalized, it will be reviewed by the director and W3M and then sent to W3C members for formal approval.

Comments and questions as well as general expressions of interest and support are expected on the public-annotation@w3.org mailing list.

Five Documents Published by the HTML Working Group

The HTML Working Group has updated a Candidate Recommendation, published two Last Call Working Drafts, updated a Working Draft and a Working Group Note today:

  • Updated Candidate Recommendation of HTML5. This specification defines the 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). In this version, new features are introduced to help Web application authors, new elements are introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention has been given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability.
  • Last Call Working Draft of Polyglot Markup: A robust profile of the HTML5 vocabulary. A document that uses polyglot markup is a document that is a stream of bytes that parses into identical document trees (with some exceptions, as noted in the Introduction) when processed either as HTML or when processed as XML. Polyglot markup that meets a well-defined set of constraints is interpreted as compatible, regardless of whether it is processed as HTML or as XHTML, per the HTML5 specification. Polyglot markup uses a specific DOCTYPE, namespace declarations, and a specific case—normally lower case but occasionally camel case—for element and attribute names. Polyglot markup uses lower case for certain attribute values. Further constraints include those on void elements, named entity references, and the use of scripts and style. Comments are welcome through 25 February 2014.
  • Last Call Working Draft of W3C DOM4. DOM defines a platform-neutral model for events and document nodes. Comments are welcome through 4 March 2014.
  • Updated Working Draft of HTML 5.1. This specification defines the 5th major version, first minor revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). In this version, new features continue to be introduced to help Web application authors, new elements continue to be introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention continues to be given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability.
  • Working Group Note of W3C HTML Ruby Markup Extensions. The ruby markup model currently described in the HTML specification is limited in its support for a number of features, notably jukugo and double-sided ruby, as well as inline ruby. This specification addresses these issues by introducing new elements and changing the ruby processing model. Specific care has been taken to ensure that authoring remains as simple as possible.

CSS Fragmentation Module Level 3 Working Draft Updated

The CSS Working Group published an updated Working Draft of CSS Fragmentation Module Level 3. This module describes the fragmentation model that partitions a flow into pages, columns, or regions. It builds on the Page model module and introduces and defines the fragmentation model. It adds functionality for pagination, breaking variable fragment size and orientation, widows and orphans.

CSS Grid Layout Module Level 1 Working Draft Updated

The W3C CSS Working Group has published an updated Working Draft of CSS Grid Layout Module Level 1. This CSS module defines a two-dimensional grid-based layout system, optimized for user interface design. In the grid layout model, the children of a grid container can be positioned into arbitrary slots in a flexible or fixed predefined layout grid. CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc.

Some W3C Documents in EPUB3

I have been having fun the past few months, when I had some time, with a tool to convert official W3C publications (primarily Recommendations) into EPUB3. Apart from the fact that this helped me to dive into some details of the EPUB3 Specification, I think the result might actually be useful. Indeed, it often happens that a W3C Recommendation consists, in fact, of several different publications. This means that just archiving one single file is not enough if, for example, you want to have those documents off line. On the other hand, EPUB3 is perfect for this; one creates an eBook contains all constituent publications as “chapters”. Yep, EPUB3 as complex archiving tool:-)

The Python tool (which is available in github) has now reached a fairly stable state, and it works well for documents that have been produced by Robin Berjon’s great respec tool. I have generated, and put up on the Web, two books for now:

  1. RDFa 1.1, a Recommendation that was published last August (in fact, there was an earlier version of an RDFa 1.1. EPUB book, but that was done largely manually; this one is much better).
  2. JSON-LD, a Recommendation published this week (i.e., 16th of January).

(Needless to say, these books have no formal standing; the authoritative versions are the official documents published as a W3C Technical Report.)

There is also draft version for a much larger book on RDF1.1, consisting of all the RDF 1.1 specifications to come, including all the various serializations (including RDFa and JSON-LD). I say “draft”, because those documents are not yet final (i.e., not yet Recommendations); a final version (with, for example, all the cross-links properly set) will be at that URI when RDF 1.1 becomes a Recommendations (probably in February).

(Republished from my personal blog.)

Chinese Digital Publishing Community Group at W3C

A new Community Group has been set up at W3C, called “Chinese Digital Publishing Community Group”. The group aims to provide a platform for the Chinese digital publishing industry to share perspectives on Chinese text layout, copyrights and other occupational standards. The group will conduct its discussion in Chinese; its work will complement, and will cooperate with, the Digital Publishing Interest Group at W3C. No specifications will be published by the group.