W3C

Category Archives: Privacy

A Time for Compromise on Do Not Track

We last blogged about the Tracking Protection Working Group in June, immediately after the group's face-to-face meeting in Bellevue. That meeting was productive and laid the ground work for further progress. The "Tracking Preference Expression" (DNT) header is now implemented...
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Report from Bellevue: meaningful advances on Do Not Track

As mentioned last week, the difficult and at times controversial discussion of Do Not Track standardization continued with a three-day meeting of the Tracking Protection Working Group in Bellevue, Washington. I want to report briefly on the course of discussion and the progress made, including meaningful advances towards consensus on Do Not Track.
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Tracking Controversy

The Web has transformed how we do business, how we interact, and how we innovate. As a result, the future of Web technology can be a high-stakes conversation. When stakeholders with strong competing interests engage in that conversation, controversy is...
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The state of Do Not Track

It's time to take stock of the last two months in Do Not Track. Since the White House announcement in February, a lot has happened, both in the policy conversations that surround the work in the W3C Tracking Protection...
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Do Not Track: The Regulators’ Challenge.

The fine people at the UC Berkeley law school have pulled together an amazing two-day workshop about Web Tracking in Brussels. The conversation kicked off today with European Commissioner Neelie Kroes talking about privacy, self-regulation and do not track,...
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Tracking Protection and Do Not Track at W3C

We see broad support for specification work on both Tracking Protection Lists and Do Not Track. Furthermore, there is widespread interest in also working towards consensus on the definition of tracking: what is it that a user setting "Do Not Track" asks for, and how do sites comply with such a request? What are the next steps at W3C?
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