HTML+RDFa 1.1 is a Proposed Recommendation; two other RDFa Proposed Edited Recommendations Published

The RDFa Working Group has published a Proposed Recommendation for HTML+RDFa 1.1. This specification defines rules and guidelines for adapting the RDFa Core 1.1 and RDFa Lite 1.1 specifications for use in HTML5 and XHTML5. The rules defined in this specification not only apply to HTML5 documents in non-XML and XML mode, but also to HTML4 and XHTML documents interpreted through the HTML5 parsing rules.

The Working Group has also published two Proposed Edited Recommendations for RDFa Core 1.1 and XHTML+RDFa 1.1, folding in the errata reported by the community since their publication as Recommendations in June 2012; all changes are editorial.

W3C’s RDF Validation Workshop – Practical Assurances for Quality RDF Data

W3C announced today a RDF Validation Workshop – Practical Assurances for Quality RDF Data, 10-11 September 2013, in Cambridge, USA. The Semantic Web has demonstrated considerable value for collaborative contributions to data. Adoption in many mission-critical environments requires data to conform to specified patterns. Validation in a banking context shares many requirements with quality assurance of linked clinical data. Systems like Linked Open Data, which don’t have formal interface specifications, share these validation needs. Most data representation languages used in conventional settings offer some sort of input validation, ranging from parsing grammars for domain-specific languages to XML Schema or RelaxNG for XML structures. While the distributed nature of RDF affects the notions of “validity”, tool chains need to be established to ensure data integrity. The goal of this workshop is to discuss use cases for data validation on the Semantic Web with development of technologies to enable those use cases. W3C membership is not required to participate. The event is open to all. All participants are required to submit a position paper by 30 June 2013.

JSON-LD Algorithms and API 1.0: 2nd Last Call

The JSON-LD Community Group and the RDF Working Group have announced the 2nd Last Call publication of the JSON-LD 1.0: Algorithms and API specification.

JSON-LD harmonizes the representation of Linked Data in JSON by describing a common JSON representation format for expressing directed graphs; mixing both Linked Data and non-Linked Data in a single document. The format has already been adopted by large companies such as Google in their Gmail product and is available to over 425 million customers around the world.

The syntax is designed to not disturb already deployed systems running on JSON, but provide a smooth upgrade path from JSON to JSON-LD. It is primarily intended to be a way to use Linked Data in Web-based programming environments, to build interoperable Linked Data Web services, and to store Linked Data in JSON-based storage engines. The JSON-LD 1.0 Algorithms and API specification describes useful Algorithms for working with JSON-LD data. It also specifies an Application Programming Interface that can be used to transform JSON-LD documents in order to make them easier to work with in programming environments like JavaScript, Python, and Ruby.

This is a 2nd Last Call publication for the JSON-LD 1.0 Algorithms and API specification. Changes since the previous publication include a shift to use a Future’s based API design approach, better base URL processing, and better translation of data from RDF.
All substantive technical work on the specification is complete. Feedback on both specifications is encouraged and should be sent to public-rdf-comments@w3.org. The 2nd Last Call period will end in 3 weeks, on June 06th 2013.

If you would like to learn more about JSON-LD, there is a helpful introductory video on the topic as well as the json-ld.org website.

New vCard in RDF Ontology draft

The Semantic Web Interest Group has published a new draft for the vCard-in-RDF Ontology, edited by Renato Iannella and James McKinney. The new draft updates the previous version by aligning it with the latest IETF vCard specification, ie, RFC6350.

This is a draft; If you wish to make comments regarding this document, please send them to semantic-web@w3.org (subscribe, archives). The goal is to publish an Interest Group Note once there is a consensus in the community.

The The PROV Family of Documents are W3C Recommendations

The W3C Provenance Working Group was chartered to develop a framework for interchanging provenance on the Web. The Working Group has now published the PROV Family of Documents as W3C Recommendations, along with corresponding supporting notes. You can find a complete list of the documents in the PROV Overview Note. PROV enables one to represent and interchange provenance information using widely available formats such as RDF and XML. In addition, it provides definitions for accessing provenance information, validating it, and mapping to Dublin Core.

JSON-LD 1.0 is a Last Call Working Draft

The JSON-LD Community Group and the RDF Working Group are pleased to announce the Last Call publication of the JSON-LD 1.0 specification and the JSON-LD 1.0: Algorithms and API specification.

JSON has proven to be a highly useful object serialization and messaging format. JSON-LD is a JSON-based format that can be used to serialize Linked Data. The syntax is designed to not disturb already deployed systems running on JSON, but provide a smooth upgrade path from JSON to JSON-LD. It is primarily intended to be a way to use Linked Data in Web-based programming environments, to build interoperable Web services, and to store Linked Data in JSON-based storage engines. JSON-LD is capable of serializing any RDF graph or dataset and most, but not all, JSON-LD documents can be directly transformed to RDF.

The JSON-LD 1.0 Algorithms and API specification describes useful Algorithms for working with JSON-LD data. It also specifies an Application Programming Interface that can be used to transform JSON-LD documents in order to make them easier to work with in programming environments like JavaScript, Python, and Ruby.

This is a Last Call publication for both specifications. All substantive technical work on each specification is complete. Feedback on both specifications is encouraged and should be sent to public-rdf-comments@w3.org. The Last Call period will end in 4 weeks, on May 10th 2013.

You can learn more about JSON-LD in the video introduction to JSON-LD.

Working drafts for RDF 1.1 Semantics, TriG, N-Triples and N-Quads published

The W3C RDF Working Group has published two Working Drafts today:

  • RDF 1.1 Semantics. This document describes a precise semantics for the Resource Description Framework 1.1 and RDF Schema. It defines a number of distinct entailment regimes and corresponding systems of inference rules. It is part of a suite of documents which comprise the full specification of RDF 1.1.
  • TriG. This document defines a textual syntax for RDF called TriG that allows an RDF dataset to be completely written in a compact and natural text form, with abbreviations for common usage patterns and datatypes. TriG is an extension of the Turtle format.

The RDF Working Group also published two Group Notes today:

  • N-Triples. N-Triples is a line-based, plain text format for encoding an RDF graph.
  • N-Quads. N-Quads is a line-based, plain text format for encoding an RDF dataset.

Successful PROV Tutorial at EDBT

On March 20th, 2013 members of the  Provenance Working Group gave a tutorial on the  PROV family of specifications at the EDBT conference in Genova, Italy. EDBT (“Extending Database Technology”) is widely regarded as one of the prime venues in Europe for dissemination of data management research.

The idea behind the tutorial was to provide a “database-centric” view of PROV, as a complement to the Semantic Web perspective offered by other tutorials, past and future, namely the ISWC’12 PROV tutorial (Boston, Nov. 2012) and the upcoming ESWC’13 PROV tutorial (Montpellier, France May 26-30).

The 1.5 hours tutorial was attended by about 26 participants, mostly from academia. It was structured into three parts of approximately the same length. The first two parts introduced PROV as a relational data model with constraints and inference rules, supported by a (nearly) relational notation (PROV-N). The third part presented known extensions and applications of PROV, based on the extensive PROV implementation report and implementations known to the presenter at the time.

All the presentation material is available here.

We encourage you to take a look at this tutorial material or attend one of the future tutorials on PROV.