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Category: Update

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Updated Working Draft: Requirements for Hangul Text Layout and Typography

The updated Working Draft of Requirements for Hangul Text Layout and Typography brings the English version of the draft into line with a number of changes prompted by feedback that were added to the editor’s copy. Notes pointing to as yet unresolved comments were also added to the document. It also points to the new location of the editor’s draft, on github, and suggest the use of github issues for future comments.

The document describes requirements for general Korean language/Hangul text layout and typography realized with technologies like CSS, SVG and XSL-FO. The document is mainly based on a project to develop the international standard for Korean text layout.

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Updated article: Character encodings for beginners

This article was updated to emphasize that UTF-8 should be the default character encoding on the Web. In addition, editorial changes were made to improve the readability of the article and bring it in line with more recent templates.

Translators are requested to update their translations appropriately.

Categories: Update

Updated article: Tagging text with no language

The article Tagging text with no language was updated to correct that statement that lang=”” is not appropriate for HTML. This was introduced with HTML5.

In addition, various editorial changes were made and the page was reorganized, moving the information about XHTML and XML schema considerations to a new advanced section.

Counter Styles: two documents published

The Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group has published a Candidate Recommendation of CSS Counter Styles Level 3. It adds new built-in counter styles to those defined in CSS 2.1, but, more importantly, it also allows authors to define custom styles for list markers, numbered headings and other types of generated content.

At the same time, the Internationalization Working Group has updated their Working Draft of Predefined Counter Styles, which provides custom rules for over a hundred counter styles in use around the world. It serves both as a ready-to-use set of styles to copy into your own style sheets, and also as a set of worked examples.

Updated article: Why use the language attribute?

The article Why use the language attribute? received a number small of editorial changes, which have been incorporated into the translated versions.

In addition, the following new paragraph was added to the section ‘Styling Pages':

Other typographic and layout features that are affected by language include line-breaking, justification, and case conversion, and more are coming as the specifications develop.

This paragraph has been added, in English, to the German, Russian and Ukrainian translations of the article. Translators, are asked to please provide a translation of the new paragraph.

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Categories: Update

Updated article: Declaring language in HTML

The article Declaring language in HTML was changed at the end of May. A noticeable change was the introduction of additional headings, to enable readers to more quickly spot relevant information. Also a new section was added: What if element content and attribute values are in different languages?

German, Spanish, Russian and Ukranian translators are asked to update their translations.

Categories: Update, w3cWebDesign

Last Call draft published for Encoding spec

A Last Call Working Draft of Encoding has been published.

While encodings have been defined to some extent, implementations have not always implemented them in the same way, have not always used the same labels, and often differ in dealing with undefined and former proprietary areas of encodings. This specification attempts to fill those gaps so that new implementations do not have to reverse engineer encoding implementations of the market leaders and existing implementations can converge.

The body of this spec is an exact copy of the WHATWG version as of the date of its publication, intended to provide a stable reference for other specifications. We are hoping for people to review the specification and send comments about any technical areas that need attention (see the Status section for details).

Please send comments by 1 July 2014.

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Updates to two Working Group Notes published

Authoring HTML: Handling Right-to-left Scripts and Authoring HTML: Language declarations have both been updated to a new format that lists do’s and don’ts, but points to existing or new articles for detailed information. This will significantly help in keeping the material up to date in the future as technology changes. The documents have also been thoroughly overhauled to reflect the latest changes and information on

The first document provides advice to content authors using HTML markup and CSS style sheets about how to create pages for languages that use right-to-left scripts, such as Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Thaana, Urdu, etc. It explains how to create content in right-to-left scripts that builds on but goes beyond the Unicode bidirectional algorithm, as well as how to prepare content for localization into right-to-left scripts.

The second helps content authors specify the language of content, which is useful for a wide number of applications, from linguistically-sensitive searching to applying language-specific display properties. In some cases the potential applications for language information are still waiting for implementations to catch up, whereas in others it is a necessity today. Adding markup for language information to content is something that can and should be done now and as content is first developed. If not, it will be much more difficult to take advantage of any future developments.

Updated article: Declaring character encodings in CSS

This update brings the article in line with recent developments in CSS, and reorganizes the material so that readers can find information more quickly. This led to the article being almost completely rewritten.

The article addresses the question: How do I declare the character encoding of a CSS style sheet?

German, Greek, Spanish, Hebrew, Hungarian, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese translators are asked to update their translation of this article within the next month, otherwise the translations will be removed per the translation policy, since the changes are substantive.

Updated article: Choosing & applying a character encoding

This update brings the article in line with recent developments in HTML5, and reorganizes the material so that readers can find information more quickly. This led to the article being almost completely rewritten.

The article addresses the question: Which character encoding should I use for my content, and how do I apply it to my content?

German, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian translators are asked to update their translation of this article within the next month, otherwise the translations will be removed per the translation policy, since the changes are substantive.


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