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Category: Miscellaneous

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An Opera extension for the multilingual Web

One of the most popular Opera extensions is Translate, which translates a page using an automatic service. But some pages have already been translated, and checked for quality manually. HTML has provided markup to make this clear (rel="alternate" hreflang="xx" as attributes to a link) for more than a decade, but this has not been implemented in browsers, which makes it hard for users to discover.

The new Opera extension Swaplang, developed specifically for the MLW project, is an example of how a browser might natively implement this functionality. If a page uses the proper HTML markup, it shows that there are alternatives available and lets you select between them. To try it, go to the Swaplang download page with Opera 11 (or higher) and install it

If you need a test page, try Character Encodings.

The extension is still in development, with some enhancements expected. The source code is available under the Apache 2.0 open source license, in case you would rather take it in your own directions…

W3C Workshop, Call for Participation: Content on the Multilingual Web

4-5 April 2011, Pisa, Italy. Hosted jointly by the Istituto di Informatica e Telematica and Istituto di Linguistica Computazionale, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche.

The MultilingualWeb project is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the Web multilingually. The project aims to raise the visibility of existing best practices and standards and identify gaps. The core vehicle for this is a series of four events which are planned for the coming two years.

After the highly successful workshop in Madrid last year, this workshop will continue to survey currently available best practices and standards aimed at helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web.

Participation is free. We welcome participation from both speakers and non-speaking attendees. For more information, see the Call for Participation

MultilingualWeb Madrid report now available

A report summarising the MultilingualWeb workshop in Madrid is now available from the MultilingualWeb site. Alongside the summaries are links to slides, video recordings, and the IRC log for each speaker and the discussion sessions.

Entitled “The Multilingual Web: Where are We?”, the workshop surveyed and shared information about currently available best practices and standards that can help content creators and localizers address the needs of the multilingual Web, including the Semantic Web. Attendees also heard about gaps that need to be addressed, and enjoyed opportunities to network and share information between the various different communities involved in enabling the multilingual Web. Just over a hundred people attended.

The site also has pointers to blog posts, tweets and photos as well as other information related to the workshop.

Building on the success of the Madrid workshop, preparations have now begun for the next workshop, to be held in Pisa, Italy, in March 2011. A Call for Participation will be issued soon.

Unicode locale extension BCP 47 Extension U published as RFC 6067

RFC 6067 specifies an extension to BCP 47. BCP 47 provides subtags that specify language and/or locale-based behavior.

Many locale identifiers require additional “tailorings” or options for specific values within a language, culture, region, or other variation. This extension provides a mechanism for using these additional tailorings within language tags for general interchange.

The maintaining authority for the extension defined by this document is the Unicode Consortium. The Unicode Consortium defines a standardized, structured set of locale data and identifiers for locale data in the “Common Locale Data Repository” or “CLDR”.

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MultilingualWeb Madrid slides, video recordings, and IRC notes now available

Slides, video recordings of speakers and IRC notes for the MultilingualWeb workshop in Madrid are now available from the MultilingualWeb site. There are also pointers to blog posts, tweets and photos related to the workshop.

Entitled “The Multilingual Web: Where are We?”, the workshop surveyed and shared information about currently available best practices and standards that can help content creators and localizers address the needs of the multilingual Web, including the Semantic Web. Attendees also heard about gaps that need to be addressed, and enjoyed opportunities to network and share information between the various different communities involved in enabling the multilingual Web. Just over a hundred people attended.

Work is under way on a summary report for the workshop, which will be announced in due course.

Building on the success of the Madrid workshop, preparations have now begun for the next workshop, to be held in Pisa, Italy, in March 2011. A Call for Participation will be issued soon.

Unicode version 6.0 released

The newly finalized Unicode Version 6.0 adds 2,088 characters, with over 1,000 new symbols.

The October 2010 release includes the Unicode Character Database (UCD), Unicode Standard Annexes (UAXes), and code charts. With the release of these components, implementers are able update their software to Unicode 6.0 without delay. The final text of the core specification will be available in early 2011.

U+1F4F1 MOBILE PHONE

A long-awaited feature of Unicode 6.0 is the encoding of hundreds of symbols for mobile phones. These emoji characters are in widespread use, especially in Japan, and have become an essential part of text messages there and elsewhere. Unicode 6.0 now provides for data interchange between different mobile vendors and across the internet. The symbols include symbols for many domains: maps and transport, phases of the moon, UI symbols (such as fast-forward) and many others – including the symbol for mobile phone itself.

U+20B9 INDIAN RUPEE SIGN

A late-breaking addition is the newly created official symbol for the Indian rupee. “With the help of the Indian government and our colleagues in ISO, we were able to accelerate the encoding process.” said Mark Davis, president of the Consortium. “Once computers and mobile phones update to the new version of Unicode, people will be able to use the rupee sign like they use $ or € now.”

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MultilingualWeb Workshop, Madrid. Initial program published.

The MultilingualWeb project, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The project will raise visibility of what’s available and identify gaps via a series of four events, over two years.

The first workshop takes place in Madrid on 26-27 October 2010. It is free and open to the public.

A first view of the workshop program has just been published. Speakers represent a wide range of organizations and interests, such as:

BBC, DFKI, European Commission, Facebook, Google, Loquendo, LRC, Microsoft, Mozilla, Opera, SAP, W3C, WHO, WWW Foundation, and more.

Session titles include: Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, and Users. The workshop should provide useful cross-domain networking opportunities.

If you are interested in attending the workshop, see the Call for Participation for details on how to register.

MultilingualWeb Workshop, Madrid. Speaker proposals due 17th September

The MultilingualWeb project, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The project will raise visibility of what’s available and identify gaps via a series of four events, over two years.

The first workshop takes place in Madrid on 26-27 October 2010.

Many interesting speaker proposals have already been submitted, and the program committee has also now confirmed lead speakers for each of the main workshop sessions from the following organizations:

Internationalizers: W3C
Creators: BBC World Service
Localizers: SAP
Users: Facebook
Machines: DFKI
Policy makers: Localisation Research Centre

See the Call for Participation for details about how to register for the workshop.

In particular, if you wish to speak at this event, and haven’t yet submitted a proposal, please send an expression of interest (see the CFP) by September 17th.

CLDR 1.9 Collation Changes proposed

The Unicode CLDR committee is making Unicode locale-sensitive collation a major focus for the next release, CLDR 1.9. There are specific changes for a large number of languages, plus a change in the default ordering of punctuation vs symbols for all languages.

See the background document for more information:
http://www.unicode.org/review/pr-175.html

If you have any feedback on any of the actions, please contact the Unicode Consortium as described in the background document.

Review period for this issue closes on October 1, 2010.

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W3C Workshop, Call for Participation: The Multilingual Web – Where Are We?

26-27 October 2010, Madrid. Hosted by the
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

The MultilingualWeb project is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the Web multilingually. The project aims to raise the visibility of existing best practices and standards and identify gaps. The core vehicle for this is a series of four events which are planned for the coming two years.

As the first of the four events, this workshop will survey currently available best practices and standards aimed at helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web.

Participation is free. We welcome participation from both speakers and non-speaking attendees. For more information, see the Call for Participation


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