Internationalization (i18n) Activity

Making the World Wide Web worldwide!


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i18n Working Group

MultilingualWeb-LT Working Group

i18n Interest Group

Internationalization Tag Set (ITS) Interest Group

Indic Layout Task Force

Japanese Layout Task Force

Activity Statement

W3C Validator Suite
Includes i18n Checker

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July 2011 (13)
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Category: Miscellaneous

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MultilingualWeb speaker deadline coming, don’t delay!

We are expecting talks from Microsoft, Wikimedia, Mozilla, Joomla, the European Commission and CNGL representatives at the MultilingualWeb workshop in Luxembourg, and we will be filling the remaining slots soon. The deadline for submission of talk proposals is 10th February, so if you want to speak at the event please register as soon as possible. You can submit your proposal on the registration form.

We also recently announced that Ivan Herman, Semantic Web Activity Lead at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), will deliver the keynote talk.

This fourth MultilingualWeb workshop will be held in Luxembourg, hosted by the Directorate-General for Translation (DGT) of the European Commission.

The MultilingualWeb project is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the Web multilingually. The project aims to raise the visibility of existing best practices and standards and identify gaps, with a view to helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web.

Participation is free. We welcome participation from both speakers and non-speaking attendees. For more information and to register, see the Call for Participation.

Unicode version 6.1 announced

The Unicode Consortium has announced the release of Version 6.1 of the Unicode Standard, continuing Unicode’s long-term commitment to support the full diversity of languages around the world. This latest version adds characters to support additional languages of China, other Asian countries, and Africa. It also addresses educational needs in the Arabic-speaking world. A total of 732 new characters have been added.

List of changesCode charts

This version of the Standard also brings technical improvements to support implementers. Improved changes to property values and their aliases mean that properties now have easy-to-specify labels. The new labels combined with a new script extensions property means that regular expressions can be more straightforward and are easier to validate.

Over 200 new Standardized Variants have been added for emoji characters, allowing implementations to distinguish preferred display styles between text and emoji styles. For example:

26FA FE0E TENT text style
26FA FE0F TENT emoji style
26FD FE0E FUEL PUMP text style
26FD FE0F FUEL PUMP emoji style

Among the notable property changes and additions in Unicode 6.1 are two new line break property values, which improve the line-breaking behavior of Hebrew and Japanese text. Segmentation behavior was also improved for Thai, Lao, and similar languages.

Two other important Unicode specifications are maintained in synchrony with the Unicode Standard, and have updates for Version 6.1. These will be finalized in February:

UTS #10, Unicode Collation Algorithm
UTS #46, Unicode IDNA Compatibility Processing

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Ivan Herman to Keynote at the MultilingualWeb workshop in Luxembourg

Ivan Herman, Semantic Web Activity Lead at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), will deliver the keynote talk at the upcoming MultilingualWeb workshop. This 4th MultilingualWeb workshop will be held in Luxembourg, hosted by the Directorate-General for Translation (DGT) of the European Commission.

Ivan will give an overview of the current work done at the W3C related to the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and related technical issues. The goal is not to give a detailed technical account but, rather, to give a general, and accessible, overview and use this is a basis for further discussions on how that particular technology can be used for the general issue of Multilingual Web.

Formerly head of the worldwide W3C Offices program, Ivan has been with the W3C since 2001, and also holds a tenure position at the Centre for Mathematics and Computer Sciences (CWI) in Amsterdam. He is a member of IW3C2 (International World Wide Web Conference Committee), and of SWSA (Semantic Web Science Association), the committee responsible for the International Semantic Web Conferences series.

The MultilingualWeb project is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the Web multilingually. The project aims to raise the visibility of existing best practices and standards and identify gaps, with a view to helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web.

Participation is free. We welcome participation from both speakers and non-speaking attendees. For more information and to register, see the Call for Participation.

Video links now available for Limerick MultilingualWeb workshop

Video recordings of speakers at the MultilingualWeb workshop in Limerick are now available, in addition to the previously uploaded slides and IRC notes.

Entitled “A Local Focus for the Multilingual Web”, the workshop surveyed and shared information about currently available best practices and standards that can help content creators and localizers address the needs of the multilingual Web, including the Semantic Web. Attendees also heard about gaps that need to be addressed, and enjoyed opportunities to network and share information between the various different communities involved in enabling the multilingual Web. The second day was given over to an Open Space discussion with breakouts.

Work is under way on a summary report for the workshop, which will be announced in due course.

Building on the success of the Madrid, Pisa and Limerick workshops, preparations have now begun for the next workshop, to be held in Luxembourg, at the European Commission, in March 2012. See the Call for Participation.

Thanks to VideoLectures for hosting the videos.

W3C Workshop, Call for Participation: The Multilingual Web – The Way Ahead

15 – 16 March 2012, Luxembourg. Co-located with the European Commission’s Language Technology Showcase Days, and hosted by the Directorate-General for Translation (DGT) of the European Commission.

The MultilingualWeb project is looking at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the Web multilingually. The project aims to raise the visibility of existing best practices and standards and identify gaps. The core vehicle for this is a series of four events which are planned over two years.

After three highly successful workshops in Madrid, Pisa, and Limerick, this final workshop in the series will continue to investigate currently available best practices and standards aimed at helping content creators, localizers, tools developers, and others meet the challenges of the multilingual Web.

Participation is free. We welcome participation from both speakers and non-speaking attendees. For more information, see the Call for Participation

RSS feed links changed

The Internationalization Activity home page has recently been ported to WordPress. This means that the URIs for the various RSS feeds have changed. You can find the new links at the page W3C I18n news filters and RSS feeds.

The current URIs will continue to work for a short while, to support the transition, but you should change as soon as possible.

URIs for category filters have also changed, as have those for search key text within posts (useful for finding the history of a particular article or document). The latter have been converted to tags.

Slides and IRC logs for Limerick MultilingualWeb workshop now available

The MultilingualWeb Workshop in Limerick was once more a success, thanks to the efforts of the excellent speakers and the local organizers, but also thanks this time to the participants themselves who enthusiastically took part in the Open Space discussion organized by TAUS. This will hopefully lead to some longer term initiatives, and most groups are already planning to continue their discussions in Luxembourg, next Spring. We had around 90 attendees.

The program page has now been updated to point to speakers’ slides and to the relevant parts of the IRC logs. Links to video recordings will follow shortly.

There will also be a page pointing to social media reports, such as blog posts, tweets and photos, related to the workshop. If you have any blog posts, photos, etc. online, please let Richard Ishida know (ishida@w3.org) so that we can link to them from this page.

A summary report of the workshop will follow a little later.

Registrations are filling up for the MultilingualWeb workshop in Limerick, 21-22 Sept.

Register now if you want to ensure that you get a place.

Participation in the workshop is free, but spaces are limited. We have another great program in place.

The keynote speaker will be Daniel Glazman, of Disruptive Innovations, and co-chair of the W3C CSS Working Group. He is followed by a strong line up in sessions entitled Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, Users, and Policy. On the morning of the second day Jaap van der Meer of TAUS will facilitate “Open Space” style discussion sessions, where workshop participants themselves will choose topics to discuss in several breakout groups.

There will be a dinner reception on the evening of 21 September (free of charge, workshop registrants only).

The MultilingualWeb workshops, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, look at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The workshops are successful because they attracted a wide range of participants, from fields such as localization, language technology, browser development, content authoring and tool development, etc., to create a holistic view of the interoperability needs of the multilingual Web.

This workshop is co-located with the 16th Annual LRC Conference, and hosted by the LRC (Language Research Centre) and the University of Limerick.

We look forward to seeing you in Limerick!

Initial program published for MultilingualWeb Workshop in Limerick

An initial program has been published for the upcoming W3C MultilingualWeb workshop in Limerick, Ireland, 21-22 September 2011. (Co-located with the 16th Annual LRC Conference.)

The keynote speaker will be Daniel Glazman, of Disruptive Innovations, and co-chair of the W3C CSS Working Group. He is followed by a strong line up in sessions entitled Developers, Creators, Localizers, Machines, Users, and Policy.

See the Call for Participation for details about how to register for the workshop. Participation in the workshop is free.

The MultilingualWeb workshops, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the W3C, look at best practices and standards related to all aspects of creating, localizing and deploying the multilingual Web. The workshops are successful because they attracted a wide range of participants, from fields such as localization, language technology, browser development, content authoring and tool development, etc., to create a holistic view of the interoperability needs of the multilingual Web.

We look forward to seeing you in Limerick!

New version of the Internationalization Checker released

The ‘i18n checker‘ is a free service by W3C that provides information about internationalization-related aspects of your HTML page, and advice on how to improve your use of markup, where needed, to support the multilingual Web.

This latest release uses a new user interface and redesigned source code. It also adds a number of new tests, a file upload facility, and support for HTML5.

This is still a ‘pre-final’ release and development continues. There are already plans to add further tests and features, to translate the user interface, to add support for XHTML5 and polyglot documents, to integrate with the W3C Unicorn checker, and to add various other features. At this stage we are particularly interested in receiving user feedback.

Try the checker and let us know if you find any bugs or have any suggestions.

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