Internationalization (i18n) Activity

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i18n WG

i18n Interest Group

i18n Tag Set (ITS) IG

Indic Layout Task Force

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W3C Validator Suite
Includes i18n Checker

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Monthly Archives: March 2004

Posts

Web Internationalization: Standards and Practice

New talk slides [HTML]

Tutorial by Yves Savourel & Tex Texin at the 25th Internationalization & Unicode Conference in Washington DC, USA on 31 March, 2004.

Categories: Talks

An Introduction to Writing Systems: A review of script characteristics affecting computer-based script support and Unicode

New talk slides [HTML]

Tutorial by Richard Ishida at the 25th Internationalization & Unicode Conference in Washington DC, USA on 31 March, 2004.

Categories: Talks

Associating Character Encoding and language Information with HTML, XHTML and CSS Files

New talk slides [HTML(1) HTML(2)]

Presentation by Richard Ishida at the 25th Internationalization & Unicode Conference in Washington DC, USA on 31 March, 2004.

Categories: Talks

Internationalized Software Testing

New talk slides [Star Office] [Powerpoint]

Presentation by Andrea Vine at the 25th Internationalization & Unicode Conference in Washington DC, USA on 31 March, 2004.

Categories: Talks

New article: Serving XHTML 1.0

Read the article

Very briefly describes some, often surprising, aspects of how servers send XHTML to the user agent (eg. a browser), and how common user agents handle the markup they receive. This article provides background information that helps explain why some aspects of CSS styling don’t work the way you expect, and also sets the scene for the approach you should use for declaring encodings.

By Richard Ishida, W3C.

Categories: Articles, New resource

New tutorial: Using language information in XHTML, HTML and CSS

This tutorial was decommissioned on 4 June, 2007.

Link to tutorial

Information about the language in use on a page is important for accessibility, styling, searching, and other reasons. In addition, language information that is typically transmitted between the user agent and server can be used to help improve navigation for users and the localizability of your site. This tutorial will help you take advantage of the opportunities that are available now and in the near future by using language information appropriately.

After reading this tutorial you should:

  • know how to apply language-specific CSS styling, where browsers support it
  • have a general understanding of the concept of server-based language negotiation
Categories: Miscellaneous

New tutorial: Character sets & encodings in XHTML, HTML and CSS

Link to tutorial

If a user agent (eg. a browser) is unable to detect the character encoding used in a Web document, the user may be presented with unreadable text. This information is particularly important for those maintaining and extending a multilingual site, but declaring the character encoding of the document is important for anyone producing XHTML/HTML or CSS. This tutorial will give you an understanding of the topic that will help you make the right choices when doing so. The topic is not as straightforward as it may sometimes appear, and the advice contained here is the end result of a great deal of thought and discussion.

After reading this tutorial you should:

  • get advice on choosing an encoding for XHTML/HTML documents
  • understand when and how to declare the character encoding (charset) for documents using XHTML/HTML and CSS
  • have a grasp of aspects of serving and coding XHTML/HTML files that affect the above
  • know when and how to use escapes and entities to represent characters
Categories: New resource, Tutorials

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