W3C

HTML5: Are We There Yet?

Back in September 2010, the HTML Chairs produced a timeline to advance HTML5 to Last Call. Today, the HTML Working Group published 6 of their documents as Last Call documents. It’s time to get more people to look at those documents and give some feedback.

Due to the timeline, the group postponed resolving some issues that were raised prior to Last Call; the group will now address them. In addition, there were objections to some decisions made prior to last call, and the group may revisit some of those. Other issues that were closed may be reopened based on new information (the accessibility issue related to the longdesc attribute is already reopened for example). The Working Group will use its decision policy to address these issues.

So while HTML5 is not yet a standard, we are making tangible progress, which is very exciting.

The Last Call review period extends until 3 August and we welcome your feedback. Note that the group will use the same process for managing issues in order to reach the next process transition by January 2012.

In the meantime, the testing effort is continuing. We have 1276 approved test cases, and 28,858 submitted ones. We still need more tests to ensure better coverage. The Group will also open itself to discussion on what to do for “HTML.next”. We welcome ideas.

4 thoughts on “HTML5: Are We There Yet?

  1. Hello,

    I am learning HTML coding, and am a little confused. The instructor keeps saying that different browsers don’t support all the tags in the same way.

    This makes no sense to me.

    The whole reason that we had the desktop publishing revolution with standardized page layout and fonts (Postscript) was so that anything printed anywhere would look the same.

    Now, I’m learning that this is not the case with browsers. Isn’t this like 2 steps forward and 1 back?

    I’m befuddled…this is like learning to typeset for 5 different machines! Does HTML 5 solve any of this???

    ~Juan Antonio Dominion

  2. I have one quick question related to HTML 5:
    It seems that documentation of Standard related to HTML5 is still in “DRAFT” stage. So I am wondering what should be choice one should go for if one want to redesign a public portal (eCommerce website – Cross browser compatibility is must) currently and need to make live in let’s say next 3-4 months.
    What would be the wise take – Go for HTML 5 Or use current HTML4/XHTML model.

    Regards,
    Dilip.

  3. @Juan

    Perhaps I’m a bit late in posting since you posted a few weeks ago, but from what I understand, HTML tags each have a different purpose. CSS (or potentially any other styling language) can be used to “style” each of these tags. However, browsers aren’t required to use CSS.

    The power of HTML is in its flexibility. Theoretically, I could create my own styling language called ASS (Andrew Style Sheets) and if it were standardized, I could have my own MIME-Type.

    Keep in mind that HTML itself should be used to create documents, not style the page. That’s what styling languages such as CSS are for.

    You need to try and look beyond just “webpages” and instead look at document structure, with headings, lists, paragraphs etc.

Comments are closed.