Important note: This Wiki page is edited by participants of the EOWG. It does not necessarily represent consensus and it may have incorrect information or information that is not supported by other Working Group participants, WAI, or W3C. It may also have some very useful information.


Promoting BAD

From Education & Outreach
Revision as of 14:28, 5 November 2012 by Shawn (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Nav: EOWG wiki main page


We welcome your help telling presenters, developers, teachers, trainers, and advocates about BAD.
You are welcome to use the sample wording below for your own blog posts, newsletter articles, etc.
If you write a blog, newsletter article, or such, please let us know by sending e-mail to wai-eo-editors@w3.org and we'll add it to our list.

Resources & Pointers

Audiences

  • Teachers, trainers
  • Conference presenters
  • Web developers
  • Accessibility advocates
  • Web accessibility evaluators and testers
  • (old audience analysis)

Tweet ideas

(Note: short uri to doc: http://bit.ly/BADdemo, short URi to message for potential promoters: http://bit.ly/BADshare )

  • BAD to Good: Demo shows example website with #accessibility barriers and fixes http://bit.ly/BADshare Useful for presentations. #a11y
  • BAD to Good: WAI demo website with #accessibility barriers and fixes http://bit.ly/BADdemo Useful for presentations. #a11y
  • Need to show web devs how to fix #accessibility issues without sacrificing visual style? http://bit.ly/BADdemo #a11y
  • Read about WAI's Before and After Demo (BAD) and use it to show #accessibility at work http://bit.ly/aboutBAD #a11y
  • Need practical examples of #accessibility coding techniques? WAI made Before and After Demo for you. http://bit.ly/BADdemo #a11y
  • Cool new site, easy to use and share to show accessible design techniques applied. @w3c_wai resource. http://bit.ly/BADdemo #a11y
  • Great resource for accidental accessibility team leads. Before and After Demo from @w3c_wai http://bit.ly/aboutBAD #a11y

Draft blog posts, newsletter blurbs, etc.

Audience: Teachers, trainers

Use BAD to Train Developers to Create Great Pages for Accessibility (initial co-editors Sharron Rush and Wayne Dick)

Teaching web development professionals about web accessibility almost always includes the need to clear up misunderstandings about the impact of accessible design on visual style and presentation. The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the W3C has just updated a set of demonstration web pages to help trainers do just that.

Designing for web accessibility means creating web pages and applications that can be used by all - including people with disabilities. Many web and application developers believe that accessible web sites must be dull and lack interactivity. The Before and After Demo (BAD) is a free and useful teaching tool that gives trainers and internal accessibility advocates a set of practical examples, implemented within a set of related pages. Trainers can use BAD to demonstrate that pages can be fully accessible without changing the cool visual features that developers love.

Dr. Wayne Dick is the former Chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of California at Long Beach.

“BAD is great for these reasons,” says Dr Dick. “And here is support for that…..”

Audience: Public speakers

BAD Shows Audiences How to Do Good for Accessibility (initial co-editors Sharron Rush and Wayne Dick)

Web accessibility means designing pages and applications so that they can be used by everyone, including people with disabilities, some of whom use assistive technologies to browse the web. Accessibility is required by federal law in many instances and courts are broadening their interpretation of how the legal requirements are implemented. Many know that web accessibility is an increasingly important issue, but are not sure what to do.

It is not uncommon for individuals who recognize and speak up about the need for accessibility within an organization to find that they have become experts by default. For those in this situation and who are invited to speak to groups about web accessibility, an updated tool from the W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) can help.

The Before and After Demo (BAD) is an updated set of related web pages that provide fully integrated examples of accessibility at work. Sharp, new, and fun to use, BAD is designed to serve a variety of purposes. In addition to raising general awareness of web accessibility issues, BAD is a highly effective way to show how Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2) can be applied without sacrificing visual appeal or interactivity.

BAD shows common accessibility barriers using practical examples. The demonstration consists of an inaccessible Web site, an accessible version of the same site, as well as a report about the demonstrated barriers. The demonstration does not attempt to cover every checkpoint of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) nor to provide an exhaustive list of examples but to demonstrate some key aspects of Web accessibility appropriate for short, focused presentations.

Demonstrating practical examples during presentation is usually very effective. The description pages provide an overview of the accessibility barriers and features that are shown in the Demo. Together with the inaccessible and accessible Demo pages, concrete before and after examples can be explained during presentations.

Presenters are encouraged to use the demo live or to download the pages with the understanding that some pages will not have full interactivity without connection to a server. WAI is interested to hear if BAD is good for you. Please use the demo and then let WAI know about your experience. Send your comments to wai-eo-editors@w3.org (a publicly archived list) or wai@w3.org (a WAI staff-only list).

...insert contact info.

Audience: Web developers

Use BAD for Great Examples of Web Accessibility (initial co-editors Sharron Rush and Wayne Dick)

Here is a resource tip for the next time you need to meet an accessibility requirement. You had that accessibility training a few weeks age but you’re not exactly certain what they said about radio buttons and don’t really have time to sort through the guidelines and techniques of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2). When you need a good example, think BAD.

The Before and After Demo (BAD) is an updated set of related web pages that provide fully integrated examples of accessibility at work. The mini website is a project of the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the W3C and it is released for public use. A useful teaching tool, BAD is also great for those times when you want a quick memory boost about how to create an accessible data table for example, or how to when to use (and NOT to use) background images.

With BAD you can look at the inaccessible version of any of the four pages – Home, News, Tickets, and Survey; you can read a report about the accessibility barriers that were found; you can look at the same pages with accessibility fixes in place; you can look at the code; and you can download and use the page template, adapting it for your own needs.

While the general information can be very helpful, you may want to hone in on the one problem you need to solve - that one tricky item where you just want to know what the accessibility problem is and how can it be fixed? BAD pages come in two versions. The Before page is the inaccessible version. The After page is the same page, same function, same visual design but with accessibility built in. You can look right at the code to see how the problem was solved.

Use BAD for good accessibility outcomes. See more information about BAD. {shawn: I'm not sure which links you want in this paragraph and the next. anyway, I updated them from the outdated /2005/ links :-}

So the next time you need a good example of accessibility in action, think BAD. More about how to use the demo is found on the WAI site.

Audience: Internal Accessibility Advocates and Testers

W3C Releases BAD web accessibility demo for advocates and testers(initial co-editors Sharron Rush and Wayne Dick)

Designing for web accessibility means creating web pages and applications that can be used by all - including people with disabilities. Many web development teams delegate accessibility responsibility to a few or even to just to one team member. The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the W3C has just updated a tool to help make that job easier.

The Before and After Demo (BAD) is a set of related web pages that provide fully integrated examples of accessibility at work. Accessibility leads who are seeking ways to test, report, and convince fellow team members of practical accessibility techniques will find this a useful demonstration tool for many common accessibility errors. BAD puts accessibility in the context of a set of related web pages.

BAD provides an inaccessible version of each of the four pages – Home, News, Tickets, and Survey. Each one has a corresponding report of accessibility barriers contained in the page. An accessible version of the same pages with accessibility fixes in place can be viewed to demonstrate that the visual style remains largely unchanged.

In many instances, the real issues for people with disabilities are not clear to developers or managers. Browsing through the inaccessible Demo pages using different browser configurations or assistive technologies (such as screen readers and magnifiers) helps highlight these issues. {shawn: need to broaden to cover other disabilities & interaction, e.g., keyboard only} The accessible Demo pages can be browsed in the same manner to show the difference.

A well written evaluation report is key in the process of retrofitting websites for accessibility. It communicates the problems to managers and the developers who need to decide which solutions to implement. The evaluation reports of the Demo serve as a sample format for evaluators.

BAD is designed to serve a variety of purposes. Not only is BAD useful in raising general awareness of web accessibility issues, it also provides practical examples for developers and demonstrates that an accessible site can be just as visually appealing and interactive as the one with access barriers. If the tool is helpful, please consider sharing your experience with the creators at WAI. Send your comments to wai-eo-editors@w3.org (a publicly archived list) or wai@w3.org (a WAI staff-only list).

…insert contact info

Audience: Web Managers

Use BAD, a Good Example of Accessibility at work (initial editor Cliff Tillick)

Have you ever considered what it would cost to make your website accessible? If so, what has worried you most: - The time required? - The design features you might lose? - The impact on usability? {Shawn: not comfortable with intro about cost, and especially the possible mis-read that accessibility will cause you to lose design features.}

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could see an example of the difference an accessible website makes? Well now you can. But we should warn you, it’s BAD—as in “Before and After Demonstration.” Published through the W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative, BAD is a mockup of a website that contains a number of common barriers to accessibility and, linked to it, a website that has the same information but without those barriers.

The differences are hard to recognize—unless you use a screen reader or screen magnification to get information from these pages. {shawn: or keyboard only or... need to be inclusive!} Then the differences are obvious. {shawn: Otherwise, you might not notice them at all. that's because most of the differences are "under the covers" -that is, in the underlying code and they don't impact the visual design at all. ...}

Notes on posts, blurbs, etc.

  • Brainstorming -- possible theme -- When something bad becomes good. Making BAD good. (Jennifer, January 8, 2012)
  • What did site code look like before and how is it now fixed? How BAD can improve awareness about Web accessibility. (Sylvie, January 10, 2012)
  • For UN Newsletter (submitted on Jan. 23): Revised version:
    Web Accessibility:
    How to make a BAD site GREATLY accessible to people with disabilities, older users, and others: The Before and After Demo (BAD) is a newly released set of related web pages that provide fully integrated examples of accessibility at work. The mini website is a project of the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the W3C and is released for public use. A useful teaching tool, BAD is also great for those times when you want a quick memory boost about how to create an accessible data table for example, or how to when to use (and NOT to use) background images.

WAI IG e-mail

archived final e-mail

EOWG planning & record keeping

2012 blogs, newsletters, references, etc.

2012 EOWG Recent Contacts

  • Done:
    • UNDESA - Vicki (January 23, 2012)
    • ITU - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • WMO - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • ILO - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • WHO - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • OHCR - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • OHCA - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • UN NY (2)Vicki, positive feedback (February 2, 2012)
    • ITC - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • UNCTAD - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • UPU - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • EFSA - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • UNICEF - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • IAEA (2) - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • WTO - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • ICJ - Vicki (February 2, 2012)
    • WIPO (several)- Vicki, positive feedback (February 2, 2012)
    • Laura Carlson - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Russ Weakly - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Dennis Lembree - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Léonie Watson - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • John Foliot - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Jared W. Smith - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Jason Kiss - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • David MacDonald - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Kathy Wahlbin - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Olivier Nourry - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Glenda Sims - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Karen Mardahl - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Roger Hudson - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Jennison Asuncion - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Elle Waters - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Karl Groves - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Steve Buell - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Matt May - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Wendy Chisholm - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Henny Swan - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Molly Holzschlag - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Andrew Kirkpatrick - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Steve Faulkner - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Mike Paciello - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Bruce Lawson - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Gez Lemon - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • Mike Gifford - Denis [Feb 8th]
    • WANAU list (Australian Universities) - Andrew [Feb 9th]
    • 'Distributed to a total of 31 personal contacts, and many of them are in the usability field. I sent the post Shawn sent to the WAI-IG list, and of course, I focused on choosing people who I don't believe are subscribed to WAI-IG or WebAIM. I sent to 15 people on January 31, and 16 more on February 12. As best I can tell, only one duplicates Denis's effort. (Jennifer)
    • Charity webforum list (Not for profit web managers and developers) - Jason [Feb 14th]
    • Ecampaigning forum list (Not for profit web managers and developers, specialist in campaigning) - Jason [Feb 14th]
    • Derek Featherstone -- Sharron communicated with him, along with other AccessU at CSUN presenters
    • "How People with Disabilities Use the Web" panel, as part of AccessU at CSUN, February 27, 2012 [Note added by Jennifer on March 15 -- the demo would work best, when using AT, if it was done via video. To illustrate with a s.r., it's necessary to do a lot of alt-tabbing between Before and After, and it's not easy to juggle all of the technology, while explaining (and making sure both presenter and audience remain oriented in terms of whether looking at Before or After). A video would permit a short, clear, and concise presentation to show two or three key highlights and permit attendees to then undertake further independent study.]
    • Access U presenters - Sharron
  • To Do:
    • UCal State list - Wayne
    • European design for all network (EDeAN)
    • RNIB - Vicki