January 23, 2015

W3C Blog

This week: W3C WoT initiative, Accessibility Research, Cory Doctorow Rejoins EFF, etc.

This is the 16-23 January 2015 edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recent first]

Other news

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

4 articles since the 16-Jan digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippings page.

by Coralie Mercier at January 23, 2015 02:19 PM

January 18, 2015

ishida >> blog

Bengali picker & character & script notes updated

Screen Shot 2015-01-18 at 07.42.56

Version 16 of the Bengali character picker is now available.

Other than a small rearrangement of the selection table, and the significant standard features that version 16 brings, this version adds the following:

  • three new buttons for automatic transcription between latin and bengali. You can use these buttons to transcribe to and from latin transcriptions using ISO 15919 or Radice approaches.
  • hinting to help identify similar characters.
  • the ability to select the base character for the display of combining characters in the selection table.

For more information about the picker, see the notes at the bottom of the picker page.

In addition, I made a number of additions and changes to Bengali script notes (an overview of the Bengali script), and Bengali character notes (an annotated list of characters in the Bengali script).

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at January 18, 2015 08:10 AM

January 16, 2015

W3C Blog

This week: W3C TAG election, HTML5 Japanese CG, W3C in figures (2014), etc.

This is the 9-16 January 2015 edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recent first]

Net Neutrality & Open Web

  • n/a

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

4 articles since the 9-Jan digest; see one below. You may read all articles in our Press Clippings page.

by Coralie Mercier at January 16, 2015 03:00 PM

January 13, 2015

ishida >> blog

Initial letter styling in CSS

initial-letter-tibetan-01

The CSS WG needs advice on initial letter styling in non-Latin scripts, ie. enlarged letters or syllables at the start of a paragraph like those shown in the picture. Most of the current content of the recently published Working Draft, CSS Inline Layout Module Level 3 is about styling of initial letters, but the editors need to ensure that they have covered the needs of users of non-Latin scripts.

The spec currently describes drop, sunken and raised initial characters, and allows you to manipulate them using the initial-letter and the initial-letter-align properties. You can apply those properties to text selected by ::first-letter, or to the first child of a block (such as a span).

The editors are looking for

any examples of drop initials in non-western scripts, especially Arabic and Indic scripts.

I have scanned some examples from newspapers (so, not high quality print).

In the section about initial-letter-align the spec says:

Input from those knowledgeable about non-Western typographic traditions would be very helpful in describing the appropriate alignments. More values may be required for this property.

Do you have detailed information about initial letter styling in a non-Latin script that you can contribute? If so, please write to www-style@w3.org (how to subscribe).

by r12a at January 13, 2015 12:13 PM

January 12, 2015

W3C Blog

2014 in figures

Infographic showing numbers for W3C activity in 2014

Text only version

Notes & assumptions

  • Average orbital height of the International Space Station is estimated at 415 km (258 miles).
  • The world’s largest hypostyle hall is the temple of Amon-Re at Karnak, in Egypt.
  • Sumo wrestler weight is 149 kg (328 lb), calculated as the average of the current three yokozuna (grand champions) — Hakuho, Harumafuji and Kakuryu.
  • Emails are assumed to be individually printed on A4 paper (80 g/m2).
  • Airliner capacity is based on Boeing 737-800 planes with 189 seats in a single-class layout.
  • Thank you to Openclipart for being a great source of SVG images.

by Daniel Davis at January 12, 2015 06:00 AM

January 09, 2015

W3C Blog

Last week: W3C and OGC to work on Spatial Data on the Web, WAI Tutorials, W3Training, etc.

This is the 2-9 January 2015 edition -after a hiatus on 19 December 2014- of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recent first]

Net Neutrality

  • Ars Technica: Title II for Internet providers is all but confirmed by FCC chairmanFederal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler implied that Title II of the Communications Act will be the basis for new net neutrality rules governing the broadband industry. […] proposed rules […] will be circulated within the Commission on February 5 and voted on on February 26.

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

5 articles since the last digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippings page.

by Coralie Mercier at January 09, 2015 04:41 PM

January 06, 2015

ishida >> blog

The Combining Character Conundrum

I’m struggling to show combining characters on a page in a consistent way across browsers.

For example, while laying out my pickers, I want users to be able to click on a representation of a character to add it to the output field. In the past I resorted to pictures of the characters, but now that webfonts are available, I want to replace those with font glyphs. (That makes for much smaller and more flexible pages.)

Take the Bengali picker that I’m currently working on. I’d like to end up with something like this:

comchacon0

I put a no-break space before each combining character, to give it some width, and because that’s what the Unicode Standard recommends (p60, Exhibiting Nonspacing Marks in Isolation). The result is close to what I was looking for in Chrome and Safari except that you can see a gap for the nbsp to the left.

comchacon1

But in IE and Firefox I get this:

comchacon2

This is especially problematic since it messes up the overall layout, but in some cases it also causes text to overlap.

I tried using a dotted circle Unicode character, instead of the no-break space. On Firefox this looked ok, but on Chrome it resulted in two dotted circles per combining character.

I considered using a consonant as the base character. It would work ok, but it would possibly widen the overall space needed (not ideal) and would make it harder to spot a combining character by shape. I tried putting a span around the base character to grey it out, but the various browsers reacted differently to the span. Vowel signs that appear on both sides of the base character no longer worked – the vowel sign appeared after. In other cases, the grey of the base character was inherited by the whole grapheme, regardless of the fact that the combining character was outside the span. (Here are some examples ে and ো.)

In the end, I settled for no preceding base character at all. The combining character was the first thing in the table cell or span that surrounded it. This gave the desired result for the font I had been using, albeit that I needed to tweak the occasional character with padding to move it slightly to the right.

On the other hand, this was not to be a complete solution either. Whereas most of the fonts I planned to use produce the dotted circle in these conditions, one of my favourites (SolaimanLipi) doesn’t produce it. This leads to significant problems, since many combining characters appear far to the left, and in some cases it is not possible to click on them, in others you have to locate a blank space somewhere to the right and click on that. Not at all satisfactory.

comchacon3

I couldn’t find a better way to solve the problem, however, and since there were several Bengali fonts to choose from that did produce dotted circles, I settled for that as the best of a bad lot.

However, then i turned my attention to other pickers and tried the same solution. I found that only one of the many Thai fonts I tried for the Thai picker produced the dotted circles. So the approach here would have to be different. For Khmer, the main Windows font (Daunpenh) produced dotted circles only for some of the combining characters in Internet Explorer. And on Chrome, a sequence of two combining characters, one after the other, produced two dotted circles…

I suspect that I’ll need to choose an approach for each picker based on what fonts are available, and perhaps provide an option to insert or remove base characters before combining characters when someone wants to use a different font.

It would be nice to standardise behaviour here, and to do so in a way that involves the no-break space, as described in the Unicode Standard, or some other base character such as – why not? – the dotted circle itself. I assume that the fix for this would have to be handled by the browser, since there are already many font cats out of the bag.

Does anyone have an alternate solution? I thought I heard someone at the last Unicode conference mention some way of controlling the behaviour of dotted circles via some script or font setting…?

Update: See Marc Durdin’s blog for more on this topic, and his experiences while trying to design on-screen keyboards for Lao and other scripts.

by r12a at January 06, 2015 05:28 PM

January 05, 2015

ishida >> blog

Khmer character picker v16

khmer-picker16

I have uploaded a new version of the Khmer character picker.

The new version uses characters instead of images for the selection table, making it faster to load and more flexible. If you prefer, you can still access the previous version.

Other than a small rearrangement of the default selection table to accomodate fonts rather than images, and the significant standard features that version 16 brings, there are no additional changes in this version.

For more information about the picker, see the notes at the bottom of the picker page.

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at January 05, 2015 10:12 AM

Devanagari, Gurmukhi & Uighur pickers available

uighur-picker16

devanagari-picker16

gurmukhi-picker16

I have updated the Devanagari picker, the Gurmukhi picker and the Uighur picker to version 16.

You may have spotted a previous, unannounced, version of the Devanagari and Uighur pickers on the site, but essentially these versions should be treated as new. The Gurmukhi picker has been updated from a very old version.

In addition to the standard features that version 16 of the character pickers brings, things to note include the addition of hints for all pickers, and automated transcription from Devanagari to ISO 15919, and vice versa for the Devanagari picker.

For more information about the pickers, see the notes at the bottom of the relevant picker page.

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at January 05, 2015 09:45 AM

January 04, 2015

ishida >> blog

More picker changes: Version 16

A couple of posts ago I mentioned that I had updated the Thai picker to version 16. I have now updated a few more. For ease of reference, I will list here the main changes between version 16 pickers and previous versions back to version 12.

  • Fonts rather than graphics. The main selection table in version 12 used images to represent characters. These have now gone, in favour of fonts. Most pickers include a web font download to ensure that you will see the characters. This reduces the size and download time significantly when you open a picker. Other source code changes have reduced the size of the files even further, so that the main file is typically only a small fraction of the size it was in version 14.

    It is also now possible, in version 16, to change the font of the main selection table and the font size.

  • UI. The whole look and feel of the user interface has changed from version 14 onwards, and includes useful links and explanations off the top of the normal work space.

    In particular, the vertical menu, introduced in version 14, has been adjusted so that input features can be turned on and off independently, and new panels appear alongside the others, rather than toggling the view from one mode to another. So, for example, you can have hints and shape-based selectors turned on at the same time. When something is switched on, its label in the menu turns orange, and the full text of the option is followed by a check mark.

  • Transcription panels. Some pickers had one or more transcription views in versions below 16. These enable you to construct some non-Latin text when working from a Latin transcription. In version 16 these alternate views are converted to panels that can be displayed at the same time as other information. They can be shown or hidden from the vertical menu. When there is ambiguity as to which characters to use, a pop up displays alternatives. Click on one to insert it into the output. There is also a panel containing non-ASCII Latin characters, which can be used when typing Latin transcriptions directly into the main output area. This panel is now hidden by default, but can be easily shown from the vertical menu.

  • Automated transcription. Version 16 pickers carry forward, and in some cases add, automated transcription converters. In some cases these are intended to generate only an approximation to the needed transcription, in order to speed up the transcription process. In other cases, they are complete. (See the notes for the picker to tell which is which.) Where there is ambiguity about how to transcribe a sequence of characters, the interface offers you a choice from alternatives. Just click on the character you want and it will replace all the options proposed. In some cases, particularly South-East Asian scripts, the text you want to transcribe has to be split into syllables first, using spaces and or hyphens. Where this is necessary, a condense button it provided, to quickly strip out the separators after the transcription is done.

  • Layout The default layout of the main selection table has usually been improved, to make it easier to locate characters. Rarely used, deprecated, etc, characters appear below the main table, rather than to the right.

  • Hints Very early versions of the pickers used to automatically highlight similar and easily confusable characters when you hovered over a character in the main selection table. This feature is being reintroduced as standard for version 16 pickers. It can be turned on or off from the vertical menu. This is very helpful for people who don’t know the script well.

  • Shape-based selection. In previous versions the shape-based view replaced the default view. In version 16 the shape selectors appear below the main selection table and highlight the characters in that table. This arrangement has several advantages.

  • Applying actions to ranges of text. When clicking on the Codepoints and Escapes buttons, it is possible to apply the action to a highighted range of characters, rather than all the characters in the output area. It is also possible to transcribe only highlighted text, when using one of the automated transcription features.

  • Phoneme bank. When composing text from a Latin transcription in previous versions you had to make choices about phonetics. Those choices were stored on the UI to speed up generation of phonetic transcriptions in addition to the native text, but this feature somewhat complicated the development and use of the transcription feature. It has been dropped in version 16. Hopefully, the transcription panels and automated transcription features will be useful enough in future.

  • Font grid. The font grid view was removed in version 16. It is of little value when the characters are already displayed using fonts.

  • About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at January 04, 2015 12:53 PM

December 26, 2014

ishida >> blog

Language Subtag Lookup tool updated

This update to the Language Subtag Lookup tool brings back the Check function that had been out of action since last January. The code had to be pretty much completely rewritten to migrate it from the original PHP. In the process, I added support for extension and private use tags, and added several more checks. I also made various changes to the way the results are displayed.

Give it a try with this rather complicated, but valid language tag: zh-cmn-latn-CN-pinyin-fonipa-u-co-phonebk-x-mytag-yourtag

Or try this rather badly conceived language tag, to see some error messages: mena-fr-latn-fonipa-biske-x-mylongtag-x-shorter

The IANA database information is up-to-date. The tool currently supports the IANA Subtag registry of 2014-12-17. It reports subtags for 8,081 languages, 228 extlangs, 174 scripts, 301 regions, 68 variants, and 26 grandfathered subtags.

by r12a at December 26, 2014 08:11 AM

December 24, 2014

W3C Blog

I would like to teach the web to sing

ORF 2014 ORF 2014 web and music discussion panelDiscussion PanelHere at the W3C Keio host in Japan we try to take part in local events to demonstrate progress of the Open Web Platform. Most recently was an event called Open Research Forum which showcases the work and research of Keio University SFC (Shonan Fujisawa Campus) and we chose to focus on web and music. As well as a booth with interactive demos, we added a special session at a separate venue (Nicofarre) which combined a discussion panel and music performance to show off what can be done with web technologies.

Imagine a nightclub emptied of dancers and filled with chairs, gadgets and geeks. Now add a 360° screen courtesy of large LCD panels on all four walls and even the ceiling. That’s Nicofarre, and being owned by NicoNico Douga, a popular Japanese video-sharing website, the event was live-streamed on the web with viewer comments overlaid in real time over the animations on the aforementioned LCD panels.

ORF 2014 web and MIDI performanceThe huge animations were generated in an HTML5 canvas element on a hard-working laptop backstage and were synchronised with audio using the Web MIDI API. The API itself was fed data from two MIDI-connected electric guitars:

MIDI-compatible instrument

Web MIDI API

Canvas API

One visual effect was each string appearing as a coloured band across the walls as they were played, with animated bubbles showing where the guitarist’s fingers were placed on the fretboard.

Panel discussion at ORF 2014The intervening discussion focused not just on the status of audio-related web standards but also on other web technologies that were enhancing the event, such as remote-controlled robots that captured video using getUserMedia. These streams were sent using WebRTC to be simultaneously shown at a separate event in Tokyo — Musical Instruments Fair Japan.

We’re fortunate to have a large and passionate community of web developers and designers here in Japan, the birthplace of karaoke, and within that a keen group dedicated to web and music. They’ve previously held three hackathons to share knowledge and push the boundaries of what’s possible in a browser. Hopefully this event has highlighted how the community is trying to bring diverse areas of the web together in perfect harmony.

by Daniel Davis at December 24, 2014 12:34 PM

December 21, 2014

ishida >> blog

Thai character picker v16

I have uploaded another new version of the Thai character picker.

Sorry this follows so quickly on the heels of version 15, but as soon as I uploaded v15 several ideas on how to improve it popped into my head. This is the result. I will hopefully bring all the pickers, one by one, up to the new version 16 format. If you prefer, you can still access version 12.

The main changes include:

  • UI. Adjustment of the vertical menu, so that input features can be turned on and off independently, and new panels appear with the others, rather than toggling from one to another. So, for example, you can have hints and shape-based selectors turned on at the same time. When something is switched on, its label in the menu turns orange, and the full text of the option is followed by a check mark.
  • Transcription panels. Panels have been added to enable you to construct some Thai text when working from a Latin transcription. This brings the transcription inputs of version 12 into version 16, but in a more compact and simpler way, and way that gives you continued access to the standard table for special characters.

    There are currently options to transcribe from ISO 11940-2 (although there are some gaps in that), or from the transcription used by Benjawan Poomsan Becker in her book, Thai for Beginners. These are both transcriptions based on phonetic renderings of the Thai, so there is often ambiguity about how to transcribe a particular Latin letter into Thai. When such an ambiguity occurs, the interface offers you a choice via a small pop-up. Just click on the character you want and it will be inserted into the main output area.

    The transcription panels are useful because you can add a whole vowel at a time, rather than picking the individual vowel signs that compose it. An issue arises, however, when the vowel signs that make up a given vowel contain one that appears to the left of the syllable initial consonant(s). This is easily solved by highlighting the syllable in question and clicking on the reorder button. The vowel sign in question will then appear as the first item in the highlighted text.

    There is also a panel containing non-ASCII Latin characters, which can be used when typing Latin transcriptions directly into the main output area. (This was available in v15 too, but has been made into a panel like the others, which can be hidden when not needed.)

  • Tones for automatic IPA transcriptions. The automatic transcription to IPA now adds tone marks. These are usually correct, but, as with other aspects of the transcription, it doesn’t take into account the odd idiosyncrasy in Thai spelling, so you should always check that the output is correct. (Note that there is still an issue for some of the ambiguous transcription cases, mostly involving RA.)

For more information about the picker, see the notes at the bottom of the picker page.

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at December 21, 2014 09:18 AM

December 19, 2014

W3C Blog

This week: CSP for Gmail, CSS1 is 18 years old, W3C CEO on after HTML5, etc.

This is the 12-19 December 2014 edition -the last of the year 2014- of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recent first]

Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

5 articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippings page.

by Coralie Mercier at December 19, 2014 04:20 PM

December 18, 2014

ishida >> blog

Thai character picker v15

I have uploaded a new version of the Thai character picker.

The new version uses characters instead of images for the selection table, making it faster to load and more flexible, and dispenses with the transcription view. If you prefer, you can still access the previous version.

Other changes include:

  • Significant rearrangement of the default selection table. The new arrangement makes it easy to choose the right characters if you have a Latin transcription to hand, which allows the removal of the previous transcription view, at the same time as speeding up that type of picking.
  • Addition of latin prompts to help locate letters (standard with v15).
  • Automatic transcription from Thai into ISO 11940-1, ISO 11940-2 and IPA. Note that for the last two there are some corner cases where the results are not quite correct, due to the ambiguity of the script, and note also that you need to show syllable boundaries with spaces before transcribing. (There’s a way to remove those spaces quickly afterwards.) See below for more information.
  • Hints! When switched on and you mouse over a character, other similar characters or characters incorporating the shape you moused over, are highlighted. Particularly useful for people who don’t know the script well, and may miss small differences, but also useful sometimes for finding a character if you first see something similar.
  • It also comes with the new v15 features that are standard, such as shape-based picking without losing context, range-selectable codepoint information, a rehabilitated escapes button, the ability to change the font of the table and the line-height of the output, and the ability to turn off autofocus on mobile devices to stop the keyboard jumping up all the time, etc.

For more information about the picker, see the notes at the bottom of the picker page.

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

More about the transcriptions: There are three buttons that allow you to convert from Thai text to Latin transcriptions. If you highlight part of the text, only that part will be transcribed.

The toISO-1 button produces an ISO 11940-1 transliteration, that latinises the Thai characters without changing their order. The result doesn’t normally tell you how to pronounce the Thai text, but it can be converted back to Thai as each Thai character is represented by a unique sequence in Latin. This transcription should produce fully conformant output. There is no need to identify syllables boundaries first.

The toISO-2 and toIPA buttons produce an output that is intended to approximately reflect actual pronunciation. It will work fine most of the time, but there are occasional ambiguities and idiosynchrasies in Thai which will cause the converter to render certain, less common syllables incorrectly. It also doesn’t automatically add accent marks to the phonetic version (though that may be added later). So the output of these buttons should be treated as something that gets you 90% of the way. NOTE: Before using these two buttons you need to add spaces or hyphens between each syllable of the Thai text. Syllable boundaries are important for correct interpretation of the text, and they are not detected automatically.

The condense button removes the spaces from the highlighted range (or the whole output area, if nothing is highlighted).

Note: For the toISO-2 transcription I use a macron over long vowels. This is non-standard.

by r12a at December 18, 2014 02:35 PM

December 16, 2014

W3C Blog

OpenSocial Foundation Moves Standards Work to W3C Social Web Activity

W3C and the OpenSocial Foundation announced today that as of 1 January 2015, OpenSocial standards work and specifications beyond OpenSocial 2.5.1 will take place in the W3C Social Web Working Group, of which the OpenSocial Foundation is a founding member. The W3C Social Web Working Group extends the reach of OpenSocial into the enterprise, HTML5 and Indie Web communities.

In this post we talk about next steps for standards work at W3C and open source projects at Apache.

Note: As part of the transfer of OpenSocial specifications and assets to the W3C, requests to opensocial.org will be redirected to this blog post. For more information, please see the FAQ below.

Standards and Requirements at W3C

W3C launched its Social Web Activity in July 2014 with two groups:

  • The Social Web Working Group, which defines the technical standards and APIs to facilitate access to social functionality as part of the Open Web Platform.
  • The Social Interest Group, which coordinates messaging around social at the W3C and is formulating a broad strategy to enable social business and federation.

In addition, some OpenSocial work has moved (or will move) to existing W3C groups. Here is a summary of where you can get involved with different W3C standardization efforts and discussions.

Open Source Projects at Apache Foundation

In addition to the several leading commercial enterprise platforms thant use OpenSocial, the Apache Software Foundation hosts two active and ongoing projects that serve as reference implementations for OpenSocial technology:

  • Apache Shindig is the reference implementation of OpenSocial API specifications, versions 1.0.x and 2.0.x, a standard set of Social Network APIs that includes Profiles, Relationships, Activities, Shared Applications, Authentication, and Authorization.
  • Apache Rave is a lightweight and open-standards based extensible platform for using, integrating and hosting OpenSocial and W3C Widget related features, technologies and services. It will also provide strong context-aware personalization, collaboration and content integration capabilities and a high quality out-of-the-box installation as well as be easy to integrate in other platforms and solutions.

FAQ

Note: We will add to this FAQ over time as questions arise. Please send questions to public-socialweb-comments@w3.org

Why is OpenSocial Foundation closing?

OpenSocial Foundation feels that the community will have a better chance of realizing an open social web through discussions at a single organization, and the OpenSocial Foundation board believes that working as an integrated part of W3C will help reach more communities that will benefit from open social standards.

What does it mean that OpenSocial Foundation is closing?

OpenSocial will no longer exist as a separate legal entity, but work will continue within the W3C Social Web Activity.

What will happen to development of the OpenSocial specification?

Development will continue within the Social Web Working Group.

What will happen to development of the reference implementations Apache Shindig and Rave?

Development will continue within the Apache Software Foundation.

Where do I go if I have questions about OpenSocial?

Members of the OpenSocial Community will be actively involved in the Social Web Working Group.

Will older versions of OpenSocial specifications remain available?

Yes, they will remain available on GitHub.

Will discussion archives be preserved?

Discussion archives are in Google groups. As long as those are allowed to remain, they will remain in place.

by Ian Jacobs at December 16, 2014 08:34 PM

December 12, 2014

W3C Blog

This week: Fire TV WebApp kit, Mike[tm] Smith on HTML validation, etc.

This is the 5-12 December 2014 edition of a “weekly digest of W3C news and trends” that I prepare for the W3C Membership and public-w3c-digest mailing list (publicly archived). This digest aggregates information about W3C and W3C technology from online media —a snapshot of how W3C and its work is perceived in online media.

W3C and HTML5 related Twitter trends

[What was tweeted frequently, or caught my attention. Most recent first]

Net Neutrality & Open Web

W3C in the Press (or blogs)

<strong88

articles since the last Digest; a selection follows. You may read all articles in our Press Clippings page.

by Coralie Mercier at December 12, 2014 04:44 PM

December 11, 2014

W3C Blog

RXSS Security Audit Results

W3C recently submitted to a Web Application Penetration Test. It was conducted by researchers and testers of SBA Research within the context of Mobsetip research project and specifically targeted Reflected-Cross-Site-Scripting vulnerabilities using combinatorial testing methodologies. SBA Research approached W3C since the size of our website and the nature of our organization made for an interesting test subject. W3C seeks to continually improve its security and has submitted to penetration tests in the past, conducted its own audits and welcomes community reports on its open collaborative infrastructure. A RXSS vulnerability was found in W3C’s online tidy service and corrected. Anyone running their own instance of this service is encouraged to upgrade.

W3C appreciates SBA Research’s effort and responsible vulnerability disclosure practices.

by Ted Guild at December 11, 2014 08:06 PM

December 06, 2014

ishida >> blog

Tibetan character picker v15

I have uploaded a new version of the Tibetan character picker.

The new version dispenses with the images for the selection table. If you don’t have a suitable font to display the new version of the picker, you can still access the previous version, which uses images.

Other changes include:

  • Significant rearrangement of the default table, with many less common symbols moved into a location that you need to click on to reveal. This declutters the selection table.
  • Addition of latin prompts to help locate letters (standard with v15).
  • Hints (When switched on and you mouse over a character, other similar characters or characters incorporating the shape you moused over, are highlighted. Particularly useful for people who don’t know the script well, and may miss small differences, but also useful sometimes for finding a character if you first see something similar.)
  • A new Wylie button that converts Tibetan text into an extended Wylie Latin transcription. There are still some uncommon characters that don’t work, but it should cover most normal needs. I used diacritics over lowercase letters rather than uppercase letters, except for the fixed form characters. I also didn’t provide conversions for many of the symbols – they will appear without change in the transcription. See the notes on the page for more information.
  • The Codepoints button, which produces a list of characters in the output box, now has a new feature. If you have highlighted some text in the output box, you will only see a list of the highlighted characters. If there are no highlights, the contents of the whole output box are listed.
  • Don’t forget, if you are using the picker on an iPad or mobile device, to set Autofocus to Off before tapping on characters. This stops the device keypad popping up every time you select a character. (This is also standard for v15.)

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

by r12a at December 06, 2014 10:39 PM

Mongolian variant forms

There is some confusion about which shapes should be produced by fonts for Mongolian characters. Most letters have at least one isolated, initial, medial and final shape, but other shapes are produced by contextual factors, such as vowel harmony.

Unicode has a list of standardised variant shapes, dating from 27 November 2013, but that list is not complete and contains what are currently viewed by some as errors. It also doesn’t specify the expected default shapes for initial, medial and final positions.

The original list of standardised variants was based on 蒙古文编码 by Professor Quejingzhabu in 2000.

A new proposal was published on 20 January 2014, which attempts to resolve the current issues, although I think that it introduces one or two issues of its own.

The other factor in this is what the actual fonts do. Sometimes they follow the Unicode standardised variants list, other times they diverge from it. Occasionally a majority of implementations appear to diverge in the same way, suggesting that the standardised list should be adapted to reality.

To help unravel this, I put together a page called Notes on Mongolian variant forms that visually shows the changes between the various proposals, and compares the results produced by various fonts.

This is still an early draft. The information only covers the basic Mongolian range – Todo, Sibe, etc still to come. Also, I would like to add information about other fonts, if I can obtain them.

by r12a at December 06, 2014 10:13 AM