Glossary of "Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0"

Term entries in the "Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0" glossary

W3C Glossaries

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structural markup

From Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (2000-02-03)

"Structural markup" is markup language that encodes information about the structural role of elements of the content. For example, headings, sections, members of a list, and components of a complex diagram can be identified using structural markup. Structural markup should not be used incorrectly to control presentation or layout. For example, authors should not use the BLOCKQUOTE element in HTML [HTML4] to achieve an indentation visual layout effect. Structural markup should be used correctly to communicate the roles of the elements of the content and presentation markup should be used separately to control the presentation and layout.

From Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (2000-02-03)

A "transcript" is a text representation of sounds in an audio clip or an auditory track of a multimedia presentation. A "collated text transcript" for a video combines (collates) caption text with text descriptions of video information (descriptions of the actions, body language, graphics, and scene changes of the visual track). Collated text transcripts are essential for individuals who are deaf-blind and rely on braille for access to movies and other content.

From Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (2000-02-03)

A "transformation" is a process that changes a document or object into another, equivalent, object according to a discrete set of rules. This includes conversion tools, software that allows the author to change the DTD defined for the original document to another DTD, and the ability to change the markup of lists and convert them into tables.
user agent

From Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (2000-02-03)

A "user agent" is software that retrieves and renders Web content. User agents include browsers, plug-ins for a particular media type, and some assistive technologies.

From Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (2000-02-03)

Authoring tools may render the same content in a variety of ways; each rendering is called a "view." Some authoring tools will have several different types of view, and some allow views of several documents at once. For instance, one view may show raw markup, a second may show a structured tree, a third may show markup with rendered objects while a final view shows an example of how the document may appear if it were to be rendered by a particular browser. A typical way to distinguish views in a graphic environment is to place each in a separate window.

The Glossary System has been built by Pierre Candela during an internship in W3C; it's now maintained by Dominique Hazael-Massieux

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